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Old 05-01-2007, 11:31 PM   #1
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Electrical Wires and Shower Stall


The electrician is wiring our new construction house - a 2-story center hall colonial. Most of the wiring from the 2nd floor is being fed thru the wall down to the panel in the basement, right where the back wall of the master bath shower stall is located.
Intellectually, I know that this should be OK, as the shower wall (tile) will be waterproof. But, it still seems kind of nerve-wracking knowing that if there were a problem w/ water there, that there is all these wires running behing all this water. Is this something to worry about?

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Old 05-01-2007, 11:34 PM   #2
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Electrical Wires and Shower Stall


not at all. plumbing walls are sometimes used for panels in apartment buildings

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Old 05-02-2007, 05:48 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burat View Post
Is this something to worry about?
As HB said, absolutely not.
It is a common misconception that wiring in walls cannot get wet, or if it does you will die or the house will burn down.
Saying this, do you think the wiring inside the walls will EVER get wet??? I would hope not. If so the wiring is the least of your worries.
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Old 05-02-2007, 07:57 AM   #4
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Electrical Wires and Shower Stall


Gentlemen: thank you for your replies. One thing you must understand, is that you are dealing w/ a paranoiac in me, and this is why I even brought this up. I suppose all of this is within "code" as well?
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Old 05-02-2007, 03:01 PM   #5
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From your description yes, it is well within code.

Your paranoia is not uncommon, but is quite unfounded.
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Old 05-02-2007, 06:53 PM   #6
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Better to ask than to worry. Don't worry...be happy!
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Old 05-02-2007, 07:02 PM   #7
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What's the cost to have the wiring not run through this wall?

I see nothing wrong with your considerations. Bathrooms and kitchens are the most remodeled areas of a house, not using a wall as an electrical chase that will most likely be opened up 3,4,5,10? times over the lifetime of a home is not a silly idea.

Millions of dollars and millions of man hours are spent year after year on home designs, agonizing on details that seem much more mundane than what you are considering.
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Old 05-02-2007, 08:21 PM   #8
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Mike,
That's an interesting thought, one I hadn't entertained. I haven't asked what the cost would be to re-direct it.
I am not concerned about the possibility of trouble w/ future remodeling, as the house is brand new.
My concerns are more immediate, such as whether this arrangement as is presents any kind of potential danger.
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Old 05-02-2007, 08:27 PM   #9
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Old 05-02-2007, 09:03 PM   #10
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Mike, I respect your opinion but I don't see the basis of this one. Are you saying that the wires may be in the way during a future reno?

So what if the wall "might" get opened up again in the future? IMO that is all the better so you have access to a wire chase for future renovation.

If anything it seems like a 50/50 shot. Either they will be in the way, or you'll be happy to have a chase available to run more wires.
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Old 05-03-2007, 08:49 AM   #11
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All I'm saying is that if you are building a brand new house there are decisions to be made about everything. Running wiring or plumbing in one spot or another is no different then a consideration of using steel studs in a kitchen wall to ensure a flat wall for better cabinet installation, or leaving a conduit in a wall with a chase wire for the thoughts that someone in the next 30 years might want to run another wire through there, or the 1000s of other considerations that are agonized over when it comes to planning the house for now and the future.

Keeping 10-20 wires out of a wall that has the highest odds of being opened up, drilled through to install grab bars or a dozen other reasons is not a bad idea at all.

Like I said no matter that you might never remodel your kitchen or bathroom. Those rooms are the highest likely to be remodeled. In new construction moving those wires 3 feet to the left might cost $50.00. To me that would be considered a smart decision.


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