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-   -   Electrical tape over terminals? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/electrical-tape-over-terminals-173167/)

lmorsino 02-27-2013 08:04 PM

Electrical tape over terminals?
 
Is there a code-compliant way to use electrical tape over some receptical terminals to insulate them in a metal box? If so, does the tape have a special name or can it just be any UL-listed electrical tape?

Jim Port 02-27-2013 08:12 PM

There should be no need to put tape over the screw terminals. All it does it make a mess later.

gregzoll 02-27-2013 08:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lmorsino (Post 1126421)
Is there a code-compliant way to use electrical tape over some receptical terminals to insulate them in a metal box? If so, does the tape have a special name or can it just be any UL-listed electrical tape?

As in what code are you talking about?

lmorsino 02-27-2013 08:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 1126440)
As in what code are you talking about?

NEC. Basically, without opening another Pandora's box, I am forced to use a skinny metal box in a certain location. The terminals barely clear the edges of the box, hence the question about the tape.

gregzoll 02-27-2013 08:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lmorsino (Post 1126442)
NEC. Basically, without opening another Pandora's box, I am forced to use a skinny metal box in a certain location. The terminals barely clear the edges of the box, hence the question about the tape.

What makes you think that the NEC has this info in there? If you ever find it in there, let all of us know what section. As for a skinny box, post a picture of box & this device that you are stating that is not able to clear the edges.

Stubbie 02-27-2013 08:55 PM

Actually there is a requirement in many local jurisdictions for such a device. The local electrical amendments may require arc shields when receptacles are in close proximity or embedded in wood framing or columns. We usually used plastic box extenders which are also listed as arc shields. I think you need one of these though it isn't necessarily intended for what you are asking. However IMO it is a good idea in your situation. Place it into the box first then install your receptacle.

http://thejoyofmoldings.com/wp-conte...ld-250x250.jpg

lmorsino 02-27-2013 08:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 1126448)
What makes you think that the NEC has this info in there?

It seems to have info on everything else, I am surprised by the things that are regulated. Just want to pass inspection is all...

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 1126448)
As for a skinny box, post a picture of box & this device that you are stating that is not able to clear the edges.

I posted about it before, and the solution provided was to "use a bigger box". http://imgur.com/mKgLR08

The problem is, if I do that, this particular outlet is going to be staggered from all the others (some of which have to be in single-wide boxes due to their location, see this image: http://imgur.com/2d4rhGy). I'm just trying to avoid it looking weird when its finished. I could use a plastic box I suppose. But since the wire is coming up from a basement, it has to be MC. Which can't connect to plastic. So I would have to have some sort of transition J-box (also in previous image marked with X, bad idea :huh: WTF) from MC to NM and I was trying to avoid that.

If anyone has any suggestions, I'm all ears.

Keyrick 02-27-2013 09:08 PM

Does that receptacle have to be a GFCI? Can it be fed from another GFCI receptacle?

k_buz 02-27-2013 09:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stubbie (Post 1126460)
Actually there is a requirement in many local jurisdictions for such a device. The local electrical amendments may require arc shields when receptacles are in close proximity or embedded in wood framing or columns. We usually used plastic box extenders which are also listed as arc shields. I think you need one of these though it isn't necessarily intended for what you are asking. However IMO it is a good idea in your situation. Place it into the box first then install your receptacle.

http://thejoyofmoldings.com/wp-conte...ld-250x250.jpg

We call those add-a-depths for use to extend the box to the face of the drywall to comply with 314.20.

gregzoll 02-27-2013 09:15 PM

For that box to the left, just drop the vent about 4 inches, and you should be fine on that one, in the second link. In the first link, just use the plastic boxes and you will be fine. Going with the older boxes that may already be in the home, you find that they tend to be a little smaller in width, than the boxes that are manufactured today. Reason is, due to Decora outlets like the GFCI & AFCI receptacles & Decora switches are a little larger in width & length, than the older 2 prong outlets.

You will have to scab in a block to repair the 2x4 that you moved the vent line down or even up on, along with two blocks on either side to further secure & strengthen the patch, but it will work.

Old homes are always fun, so you tend to be creative in working around old framing, plumbing & heating/cooling systems. Of course it is always easier to just gut to the bones, then go from there.

I have my switches at least 52" from the floor, due to that is where the old ones are placed, the outlets though are at around 48" when I put the two in on the wall where my stove is. One next to the switches when you first walk in, I kept it at the height of the switches for the Kitchen & dining in that box, so that I could use a three gang, soon to possibly be a four gang box if my wife gets her way with under cabinet lights on that wall, when we get to that point.

k_buz 02-27-2013 09:31 PM

Why would you HAVE to use MC when coming up from the basement?

Stubbie 02-27-2013 10:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k_buz (Post 1126473)
We call those add-a-depths for use to extend the box to the face of the drywall to comply with 314.20.

That's correct that is what it's primarily known as, it is also allowed as an arc shield in my jurisdiction and others. Arlington fittings has one that has mulitple use listings.

gregzoll 02-27-2013 10:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k_buz (Post 1126497)
Why would you HAVE to use MC when coming up from the basement?

Probably has critter issues down there, would be my guess. Then again, rats have chewed through MC.

k_buz 02-27-2013 10:14 PM

If you have critters in the joists of your basement, I can think of a better way to spend money than updating the kitchen.

Stubbie 02-27-2013 10:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k_buz (Post 1126535)
If you have critters in the joists of your basement, I can think of a better way to spend money than updating the kitchen.

This is coincidental but day before yesterday I had transmission issues with my truck. Took it to the dealer and recieved a phone call to check my garage for some kind of critter as my wiring harness was chewed in half where it entered the speed/shift sensor control box on the tranny. It was a $450 dollar repair.

Got home and looked my garage over and low and behold when I peeked behind a folded table on a wall next to where I park my truck and there sits a rabbit.

Anyone interested in a rabbit with a head injury ......:)


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