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Old 12-01-2008, 03:51 PM   #1
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Electrical size conduit question


I am having a foundation poured for a workshop 20x24. Not too big. I wanted electric in it and had previously gotten electrical quotes.

Problem is that person was more than I could afford so I thought okay, I will just have my foundation poured and then call him back when I have the money.

I did not realize I needed to have him there to put the conduit in the form before the concrete was poured. I was worried about this and my foundation man said just go get a conduit at the hardware store and I will let you lay it in and I will pour the foundation. So I have gotten about a 20 inch long gently curved 2 inch heavy gray pvc conduit. I have been reading up on this and it looks like this is what I need. I do not need inspection because I am in the country. The only inspection I will need is in plumbing and that is taken care of.

Since there are many here that do have experience I wanted to ask if I need to be aware of any further details at this point that may be of consideration. I suppose I can figure out how to lay a simple conduit down.

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Old 12-01-2008, 04:59 PM   #2
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Electrical size conduit question


2 inch sould be fine depending on the sizes of wires your going to be running. if you want to be safe run a 4 inch and a 2 inch that way you could use the 4 inch for electrical and the 2 inch for phone cable or computer lines if you ever need it.

the 4 inch may be a little over kill but it would make an easy pull later...

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Old 12-01-2008, 05:45 PM   #3
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the 4 inch may be a little over kill but it would make an easy pull later...
MAY be overkill? You cant even terminate a 4" conduit into the panel he would be usung.

You don't HAVE to install it now unless you want it hidden. You can always come up exposed on the oputside and LB/JB into the panel.

2" is a good size, it's plenty big. Make sure it is at least 18" deep and installed plumb. Make sure to tape the ends to keep out dirt and concrete.

Point it in the right direction, toward your house panel to avoid any extra bends.

Run a #6 wire and attach it to the rebar in your footing and leave enough stubed up to go to ypour panel.

Last edited by 220/221; 12-01-2008 at 05:48 PM.
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Old 12-01-2008, 06:32 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by 220/221 View Post
MAY be overkill? You cant even terminate a 4" conduit into the panel he would be usung.

You don't HAVE to install it now unless you want it hidden. You can always come up exposed on the oputside and LB/JB into the panel.

2" is a good size, it's plenty big. Make sure it is at least 18" deep and installed plumb. Make sure to tape the ends to keep out dirt and concrete.

Point it in the right direction, toward your house panel to avoid any extra bends.

Run a #6 wire and attach it to the rebar in your footing and leave enough stubed up to go to ypour panel.
Exactly, on all points.

Please do not even consider 4"!
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Old 12-01-2008, 07:00 PM   #5
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good info all the way, just one thing to add, do not use tape to cover the conduit, spend the 89 cents and buy a plastic cap. I have seen concrete dropped on top of a pipe go right through 3 layers of tape and right down the pipe, major pain in the a** to clean out.
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Old 12-01-2008, 07:49 PM   #6
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I am not sure what you mean by running a Run a #6 wire and attach it to the rebar. I am so green at this I feel well like this little guy.

If I had a picture I would understand it better.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 220/221 View Post
MAY be overkill? You cant even terminate a 4" conduit into the panel he would be usung.

You don't HAVE to install it now unless you want it hidden. You can always come up exposed on the oputside and LB/JB into the panel.

2" is a good size, it's plenty big. Make sure it is at least 18" deep and installed plumb. Make sure to tape the ends to keep out dirt and concrete.

Point it in the right direction, toward your house panel to avoid any extra bends.

Run a #6 wire and attach it to the rebar in your footing and leave enough stubed up to go to ypour panel.
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Old 12-01-2008, 08:57 PM   #7
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Electrical size conduit question


Quote:
Originally Posted by 220/221 View Post
MAY be overkill? You cant even terminate a 4" conduit into the panel he would be usung.

You don't HAVE to install it now unless you want it hidden. You can always come up exposed on the oputside and LB/JB into the panel.

2" is a good size, it's plenty big. Make sure it is at least 18" deep and installed plumb. Make sure to tape the ends to keep out dirt and concrete.

Point it in the right direction, toward your house panel to avoid any extra bends.

Run a #6 wire and attach it to the rebar in your footing and leave enough stubed up to go to ypour panel.

I agree with everything as well, except the #6 to the footing, minimum size is #4 awg to a footing.
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Old 12-01-2008, 10:02 PM   #8
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Electrical size conduit question


The tie-in to the rebar in the foundation is a ground - called a ufer. Used instead of a ground rod.

When I built my similar workshop the city building permit department had me add an additional long piece of rebar running along in the footing, tied to the foundation rebar, with one end turned up and protruding through the top of the slab at the edge so it came up through the side wall about 6". The ground wire from the sub panel attaches to this rebar stub.

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Old 12-02-2008, 12:37 AM   #9
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Electrical size conduit question


4" is seriously overkill on this useage.

The 2" PVC is most common one and easy to use and they can handle pretty good size conductors in there.

As far for rebar it have to be 13mm ( inch ) or larger so you can use the grounding point.

{ also some area you can not hid the bonding clamp so what I do used the LV old work box ( two gang size work good on this one ) so that way if you close up the wall the blank cover will show where the rebar location so you can make attachment there.

Merci,Marc
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Old 12-02-2008, 03:37 AM   #10
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4" is seriously overkill on this useage.

The 2" PVC is most common one and easy to use and they can handle pretty good size conductors in there.

As far for rebar it have to be 13mm ( inch ) or larger so you can use the grounding point.

{ also some area you can not hid the bonding clamp so what I do used the LV old work box ( two gang size work good on this one ) so that way if you close up the wall the blank cover will show where the rebar location so you can make attachment there.

Merci,Marc
Another super-cheap solution is to use a 2 gang plaster ring for accessibility. The rebar turn up us almost always near enough to a stud that you can just screw the plaster ring to the stud before the sheetrock is up.
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Old 12-03-2008, 09:29 PM   #11
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Electrical size conduit question


I was able to lay this conduit in and secure it to the ground rebar. also, I did duct tape the opening and watched over when the concrete was being poured. I have to say the people who did the foundation was very attentive to details and was happy to answer any of my questioning.

I bought a book called the complete guide to wiring by black and Decker. If I could figure out how to prewire the shop with all receptacles and wire for the fixtures I would be happy. This way all the electrician needs to do is check to see if my wiring is correct then run it to the main house meter box. I am really green at this so if I say something that is not accurate well, its because I am learning.

Let me make it clear to all. There will never be any live wires I work on. I will leave this up to the electrician. I am just hoping to save myself a grand or two.
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Old 12-03-2008, 10:20 PM   #12
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I agree with everything as well, except the #6 to the footing, minimum size is #4 awg to a footing.
My bad....#4. I was thinking of ground rods. I have always used #4 for ground rods and only recently learned (on the boards) that only #6 was required.


Use the wire to the footing rebar in lieu of ground rods. It's called a Ufer wire. Some guy named Ufer figured it would be a good idea and he earned his place in history.
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Old 12-03-2008, 10:22 PM   #13
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Electrical size conduit question


I missed that as well.
We don't do Ufers here yet so I also usually think #6 to an electrode.

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