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kelumpj 04-20-2013 07:15 AM

Electrical shock in the earthing..Heavy Electricity Bills
 
Hi, I'm from Sri Lanka and am new to the forum.

The house we are live in is an old one. Walls are kinda infested with ants..they come out of switch placements on the wall, even from some plug points.

When I touch my computer casing and CRT monitor screen I get a heavy vibration or shock, its unbearable to the skin..it shocks me as long as I touch the ground..when am touching the monitor with legs off the ground, if someone else touches me with his feet on the ground, he too gets a huge shock...This seems to be more than normal...

I'm afraid that this possible leak to earthing would kill electronics of my PC.

The earthing of the house is apparently ok..

The monthly electricity bill too seem to be higher...

Could there be some current sent to earth? thanks

stickboy1375 04-20-2013 12:30 PM

You might want to call someone to check out your situation...

mpoulton 04-20-2013 02:17 PM

Sounds like you have no bond between neutral and ground at your service, and you have a ground fault somewhere on the system. As a result, your "grounded" metal is electrified and you have lots of current flowing into your ground rod all the time. This is a very dangerous condition, and must be fixed immediately. Forget damaging the electronics - it's going to kill someone. You need to bond the utility neutral to your grounding system, and fix the ground fault, wherever it is. Bonding the neutral will probably result in an immediately blown fuse or tripped breaker, since you have a ground fault. That will help identify which circuit has the ground fault.

ddawg16 04-20-2013 02:29 PM

Go outside and find your main breaker box.

Once you find that main box, find the main ckt breaker. It's usually the biggest one in there.

Flip it off.

You and your house is now safe.

kelumpj 04-20-2013 02:35 PM

Thank you all....so should I check with the circuit breaker/fuse box first? I must ask someone to fix this fast...Cant I check this by myself?

kelumpj 04-20-2013 02:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ddawg16 (Post 1163565)
Go outside and find your main breaker box.

Once you find that main box, find the main ckt breaker. It's usually the biggest one in there.

Flip it off.

You and your house is now safe.

You told that for real? are you talking about the main switch or the main supply fuse? :(

stickboy1375 04-20-2013 02:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kelumpj (Post 1163578)
You told that for real? are you talking about the main switch or the main supply fuse? :(

If you turn off all the breakers and problem still exist, then you know you have an external issue, but if the problem goes away, you need to call someone to fine the internal problem.

Red Squirrel 04-20-2013 03:52 PM

For fun, get a clamp on meter and locate where you main ground line is. It's probably a green or bare wire going to the panel. It may be going to a water pipe. Put the clamp meter around it set to amps and see if there's any value. ANY value there is bad. Start turning off breakers till it goes to 0 to see if you can isolate it to a single breaker. It might be something as simple as a malfunctioning appliance. So it's worth doing a bit of investigating before you call someone.

This is a very serious issue though, so don't leave it this way longer than you have to. I'd be very scared to take a shower in that house. :eek:

gregzoll 04-20-2013 06:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ddawg16 (Post 1163565)
Go outside and find your main breaker box.

Once you find that main box, find the main ckt breaker. It's usually the biggest one in there.

Flip it off.

You and your house is now safe.

Doubt that there would be one. Most third world countries, this includes Sri Lanka, you would be lucky to have proper wiring techniques in place. Most of these places, the wiring is in such a mess, that people are lucky that they do not kill a person, when they touch something metal.

kelumpj 04-20-2013 10:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Red Squirrel (Post 1163617)
For fun, get a clamp on meter and locate where you main ground line is. It's probably a green or bare wire going to the panel. It may be going to a water pipe. Put the clamp meter around it set to amps and see if there's any value. ANY value there is bad. Start turning off breakers till it goes to 0 to see if you can isolate it to a single breaker. It might be something as simple as a malfunctioning appliance. So it's worth doing a bit of investigating before you call someone.

This is a very serious issue though, so don't leave it this way longer than you have to. I'd be very scared to take a shower in that house. :eek:

People have been living this way for very long...There hasnt been any incident..Should I be scared then?? I guess I should be..:yes:

Red Squirrel 04-20-2013 10:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kelumpj (Post 1163885)
People have been living this way for very long...There hasnt been any incident..Should I be scared then?? I guess I should be..:yes:

Without knowing the cause, you don't know if it's something that can get worse. For example somewhere there may be a wire that is very slightly loose and contacting the ground, but because it's only slightly touching it, it's not allowing enough current through due to high resistance. One day it might finally melt a bit with the heat and move further, doing full contact, and dumping much more current to ground. Chances are it would just short out and fry, but really weird things can happen sometimes depending on circumstances. Without knowing the cause you have to leave the problem open to any possibility. I would put all effort towards finding the cause and fixing it.

It could be as simple as a malfunctioning fixture or appliance so at least do the breaker test of turning them off one by one and seeing if it goes away.

Though I don't think a malfunctioning or leaking device could cause shocks so I'm thinking the issue may be both that, and a bad ground. The whole point of the ground is to make sure you don't get shocked when a device fails like that.

kelumpj 04-20-2013 11:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 1163720)
Doubt that there would be one. Most third world countries, this includes Sri Lanka, you would be lucky to have proper wiring techniques in place. Most of these places, the wiring is in such a mess, that people are lucky that they do not kill a person, when they touch something metal.

That's not the case here, the supplier looks for standards in the system before connecting the circuit to the main supply...All the basic components are there..I saw in certain circuits the earth is connected to water / gas pipes which is not practiced here..The cambridge syllabus teaches that, I dont think it is safe...Instead here the earth line is separately connected to a metal pipe that goes into soil outside..

RWolff 04-20-2013 11:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kelumpj (Post 1163921)
.Instead here the earth line is separately connected to a metal pipe that goes into soil outside..


Hmm, just had a thought- if there has been very little rain and the soil around that pipe/rod is real dry, that can cause some issues, soil is moist, damp or wet and conducts electric, but soil turned to dust and sand from long term drought isn't going to conduct very well at all, is the soil around there real bone dry from a lack of rain?

gregzoll 04-20-2013 11:58 PM

If you are here in the United States, or Canada, yes we bond to the water pipe from the main breaker panel in most places, connected to the Neutral/Ground bus inside the main breaker panel. There is also a bond to ground at the meter pan, which you would bond your incoming telephone, catv, satellite, Outdoor antenna to, so that you do not have a floating ground from the incoming communication or tv services at the house entrance.

If you are getting electrical shocks touching equipment in your place of residence, and it is here in North America, you need an electrician. If it is a rental, then you have a issue, of the building owner not keeping up on proper maintenance of the electrical infrastructure.

gregzoll 04-21-2013 12:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RWolff (Post 1163948)
Hmm, just had a thought- if there has been very little rain and the soil around that pipe/rod is real dry, that can cause some issues, soil is moist, damp or wet and conducts electric, but soil turned to dust and sand from long term drought isn't going to conduct very well at all, is the soil around there real bone dry from a lack of rain?

Last Summer because of the drought, we had to go out and not only water our foundations, but also at least pour a 1 to 5 gallon bucket of water where the ground rods are located.

We keep a bucket of water outside for our Golden, during warmer months, and when we bring her in for the evening, I just pour it where our ground rod is. I only know where it is, due to had to pull a #8 for bonding our telephone & catv service, when we relocated those to the back of the house, from the side where they were originally located.

Suggest that everyone know where their ground rod is on their homes, because if we do have a no rain or moisture situation like last year, you need to water that point, so that the rod does its job.


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