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-   -   Electrical re-wire to code (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/electrical-re-wire-code-61002/)

diy-safely 01-04-2010 11:48 AM

Electrical re-wire to code
 
Hello.

Installing in new houses is pretty straightforward as the walls are open.

Let me give a basic, simplistic code info (do not nit-pick it, it is a simplified example to illustrate the problem I am having issues thinking about for a future project).

By code, NM cable must be...

1) Stapled within 8" of boxes
2) Stapled a max. of 4 1/2' thereafter
3) Parallel and maintained at least 1 1/4" from the face of a framing member (essentially on a vertical 2" x 4" stud, run vertically up the middle of the stud).

But, despite looking around the internet and reading books etc. I have never been able to find how you would install to meet code, for the above. on a re-wire, without opening the walls.

How do you meet the above code requirements when the the sheetrock is already installed ???

:-)

Scuba_Dave 01-04-2010 11:49 AM

You are not required to staple when fishing wire in an existing wall

diy-safely 01-04-2010 11:53 AM

Really ?

Do you have a link in the code where it says that.

Pretty much defeats the code and safety then.

Scuba_Dave 01-04-2010 12:19 PM

Forcing people to rip open walls to update wiring would be cost prohibitive
In many cases getting rid of this old wire is much better then leaving it in place

Wires loose in a wall is not really much of safety issue

busman 01-04-2010 12:22 PM

Also, most of the rules for installing Romex (stapling, distances, etc.) are designed to protect the cable from damage from drywall screws. Since the drywall is already up, this issue is moot.

Mark

Big N8 01-04-2010 12:25 PM

Mark beat me to it. The code was set up so that the drywallers wouldn't damage wire.

diy-safely 01-04-2010 12:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave (Post 376483)
Forcing people to rip open walls to update wiring would be cost prohibitive
In many cases getting rid of this old wire is much better then leaving it in place

Wires loose in a wall is not really much of safety issue

"Forcing people to rip open walls to update wiring would be cost prohibitive"

Yes, I understand that.


"In many cases getting rid of this old wire is much better then leaving it in place"

Sure. Of course.


"Wires loose in a wall is not really much of safety issue"

I have read/been told it was to minimise homeowners putting nails, screws in for pictures, replacing wall cabinets, kitchen cabinets etc. and hitting cables.

I see other, later posts, talk about drywallers in new construction which would be a lot greater issue. Its great to get a reason for the code. It makes it a lot easier to understand things.

Thanks for all the replies.

I just have an abundance of caution and wanted more information from people with expertise/experience with re-wires.

Thanks again.

HouseHelper 01-04-2010 01:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by diy-safely (Post 376473)
really ?

Do you have a link in the code where it says that.

Pretty much defeats the code and safety then.

334.30(b)(1).

Speedy Petey 01-04-2010 04:19 PM

HH found it.

(B) Unsupported Cables. Nonmetallic-sheathed cable shall be permitted to be unsupported where the cable:

(1) Is fished between access points through concealed spaces in finished buildings or structures and supporting is impracticable.

(2) Is not more than 1.4 m (41/2 ft) from the last point of cable support to the point of connection to a luminaire or other piece of electrical equipment and the cable and point of connection are within an accessible ceiling.


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