DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Electrical (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/)
-   -   Electrical Panel Positioning (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/electrical-panel-positioning-92828/)

Lseguin 01-19-2011 01:04 PM

Electrical Panel Positioning
 
I am in the process of designing a new home. The home will have a crawl space rather than a full basement and therefore the electrical panel must be positioned on the main floor of the home. The ideal location would be in a utility room where I have also located a clothes washer and dryer as well as a wash tub. How far does the electrical panel need to be from the wash tub and washing machine?

AndyGump 01-19-2011 01:14 PM

Shouldn't the meter panel be outside? Or maybe this is a sub-panel?

Andy.

Lseguin 01-19-2011 01:29 PM

The main panel can be inside but it has to be a certain distance from any plumbing fixture.

iminaquagmire 01-19-2011 05:49 PM

Outside panels are a regional thing. An inside panel must be located in a specific sized space clear of any obstructions. It also should be located close to the meter as there are rules regarding lengths of unfused conductors. There are ways around this, but they vary from location to location.

Working space requirements are 30 inches side to side. The panel can be located anywhere within those 30 inches. There must be 6.5' in height clear. This is minimum headroom per code. The panel space must also be clear 3' in front. of the panel.

brric 01-19-2011 05:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lseguin (Post 573794)
The main panel can be inside but it has to be a certain distance from any plumbing fixture.

Please cite a reference for this statement.

gregzoll 01-19-2011 08:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brric (Post 573922)
Please cite a reference for this statement.

My meter is outside, and the main panel is down in my basement. Again, it is a regional thing. Nothing to cite. As for the plumbing fixture citation, you can not have the panel over a sink, above a water heater or in a clothes closet, or in a Bathroom. As long as you can have a 3' bubble in front and to the sides, that if you have to jump, you are able to do so without tripping, or grabbing onto a metal object (ie sink, faucet, water heater), or in a sink full of water.

md2lgyk 01-19-2011 09:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 574021)
My meter is outside, and the main panel is down in my basement. Again, it is a regional thing. Nothing to cite. As for the plumbing fixture citation, you can not have the panel over a sink, above a water heater or in a clothes closet, or in a Bathroom. As long as you can have a 3' bubble in front and to the sides, that if you have to jump, you are able to do so without tripping, or grabbing onto a metal object (ie sink, faucet, water heater), or in a sink full of water.

I hardly think it's a "regional" thing. The NEC is very clear about how long an unfused conductor can be. I've lived in over 20 states and have never seen a breaker panel outside or a meter box inside. If your breaker panel is a long way from your meter (like my current one is), you simply use a CSID (combination service entrance device) which is nothing more than a meter box with the main breaker in it.

brric 01-19-2011 09:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 574021)
My meter is outside, and the main panel is down in my basement. Again, it is a regional thing. Nothing to cite. As for the plumbing fixture citation, you can not have the panel over a sink, above a water heater or in a clothes closet, or in a Bathroom. As long as you can have a 3' bubble in front and to the sides, that if you have to jump, you are able to do so without tripping, or grabbing onto a metal object (ie sink, faucet, water heater), or in a sink full of water.

Nothing to cite because the statement is false.

busman 01-19-2011 09:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by md2lgyk (Post 574035)
I hardly think it's a "regional" thing. The NEC is very clear about how long an unfused conductor can be. I've lived in over 20 states and have never seen a breaker panel outside or a meter box inside. If your breaker panel is a long way from your meter (like my current one is), you simply use a CSID (combination service entrance device) which is nothing more than a meter box with the main breaker in it.

The NEC is not clear about the distance. It just says "nearest the point of entrance". Also, just cause you've never seen it, it doesn't exist? Go to California to see outdoor 3R service panels. I have photos of meters that are inside the home.

Mark

Speedy Petey 01-19-2011 09:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lseguin (Post 573794)
The main panel can be inside but it has to be a certain distance from any plumbing fixture.

I agree with brric.
This is just another myth perpetuated by those who don't know any better and simply follow the "I've always done it this way" mentality.

Speedy Petey 01-19-2011 09:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by md2lgyk (Post 574035)
The NEC is very clear about how long an unfused conductor can be.

No it's not. :no:


Quote:

Originally Posted by md2lgyk (Post 574035)
I've lived in over 20 states and have never seen a breaker panel outside or a meter box inside.

Seriously? You need to get out more.
I'm not saying meters inside are at all common any more, but outside panels certainly are in certain areas.

Saturday Cowboy 01-20-2011 12:50 AM

hallways IMHO are excellent places to put panels. nobody even piles stuff in front of them.

gregzoll 01-20-2011 08:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Saturday Cowboy (Post 574158)
hallways IMHO are excellent places to put panels. nobody even piles stuff in front of them.

Brings to mind the Hoarders series, and the episode on Holmes on Homes, where the couple had everything they could stuff in the house, but were wondering why the HVAC system would not work properly.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:17 PM.