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-   -   Electrical outlet in a vanity drawer (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/electrical-outlet-vanity-drawer-21834/)

hdbdave 06-04-2008 01:17 PM

Electrical outlet in a vanity drawer
 
I am wanting to install an outlet in the back of a bathroom cabinet drawer. It would obviously need to be able to pull out when open and then recoil when the drawer closes again. I recall seeing this arrangement in some magazine in the past, but can't recall the exact details. Does anyone have any experience w/ this.
Thanks

chris75 06-04-2008 03:08 PM

To really make this legal, I would just install a receptacle in the drawer base, and then just install a small power strip inside of the drawer unit.

Termite 06-04-2008 04:09 PM

I've never seen such a thing! Provided it is GFCI protected and installed in accordance with its listing, I see no reason you couldn't do it. It would have to be something commercially made however, not a jobsite creation.

chris75 06-04-2008 04:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 127856)
I've never seen such a thing! Provided it is GFCI protected and installed in accordance with its listing, I see no reason you couldn't do it. It would have to be something commercially made however, not a jobsite creation.

Thats the problem, there is no such beast you can buy on the market.


This picture pops up quite often when the question comes up...
http://i4.tinypic.com/2yl0207.jpg

wire_twister 06-04-2008 04:57 PM

Dave, I have installed several of these things, the trick is to get the drawer short enough, or the vanity deep enough so you can cut the receptacle box in to the back of the drawer. Once that is done it is a simple matter of using flex to connect to a box installed in the wall inside the vanity. As you can guess all of mine were in new construction, with coopreation from the cabinet maker taking care of the drawer length. I always use sealtite flex for this, tried "smurf" once but it was too stiff and was trying to push the drawer open, sealtite is limber enough, tough enough, and approved for wet locations.

chris75 06-04-2008 06:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wire_twister (Post 127864)
I always use sealtite flex for this, tried "smurf" once but it was too stiff and was trying to push the drawer open, sealtite is limber enough, tough enough, and approved for wet locations.

What about protection from physical damage?

CowboyAndy 06-04-2008 06:22 PM

It would also need to be stranded, correct? Solid wire is not meant to be constantly moved.

chris75 06-04-2008 06:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CowboyAndy (Post 127882)
It would also need to be stranded, correct?

I've only seen that requirement for luminaries...

Termite 06-04-2008 09:28 PM

Wow. That is one I haven't ever seen attempted. And I thought I had seen just about everything attempted. :no:

I'd have a very hard time allowing an installation like that. The electrical contractor would have to convince me that there was adequate strain relief, protection from physical damage, and provide listings showing that the wire and conduit are for installations that involve repetitive motion. Just because a wire or conduit is flexible does not mean that it will withstand years of repeated motion.

chris75 06-05-2008 05:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thekctermite (Post 127947)
Wow. That is one I haven't ever seen attempted. And I thought I had seen just about everything attempted. :no:

I'd have a very hard time allowing an installation like that. The electrical contractor would have to convince me that there was adequate strain relief, protection from physical damage, and provide listings showing that the wire and conduit are for installations that involve repetitive motion. Just because a wire or conduit is flexible does not mean that it will withstand years of repeated motion.

I agree, thats why I go with just installing a receptacle in the base cabinet and let the H.O. take it from there... :)

Stowaway 08-19-2012 10:57 AM

The hard part about putting the power in a drawer is making the power movable. If you have a coiled spring type cord it loses its spring after time and gets in the way of the drawer or drawer slides.
It looks like the reason that you want the outlets in the drawer is to plug in Hair care items like Curling Irons, Flat Irons, and Blow Driers is that Right?
Think outside the box for a minute, and why not move these Hair Care items to behind the false front, in front of the sink? That way you can install an outlet that is fixed in place and you are using wasted space. You can purchase a kit to do this on Amazon or from Stowaway Products Inc.
http://www.stowawayproducts.net/imag...Appliances.jpg

Jim Port 08-19-2012 11:17 AM

Thanks for the suggestion, but I doubt if the OP is still trying to do this after 4 years have gone by.

Hammer450R 08-19-2012 11:27 AM

But your dealing with a women and her curling iron!!! Be very weary lol


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