Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-18-2005, 07:20 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 18
Share |
Default

electrical myster


Was capping a bathroom outlet in my 90 yr old house w.60A breaker yesterday. Outlet worked when I began but after shutting it's circuit to work on it, and switching back on after capping the lines an outlet in another room, on the same circuit, doesn't work. I tried resetting the master, nothing.

Eh?

TIA.

Ducowti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2005, 10:59 AM   #2
Electrical Contractor
 
jbfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Newnan GA
Posts: 5,782
Default

electrical myster


What do you mean capping? Did you remove the outlet and just cap off the wires. I would check the conections that you just made to ensure they are tight.

__________________
Yes I am a Pirate, 200 years too late. "Jimmy Buffett"
jbfan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2005, 11:19 AM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 18
Default

electrical myster


Quote:
Originally Posted by jbfan
Did you remove the outlet and just cap off the wires. I would check the conections that you just made to ensure they are tight.
I used the plastic screw caps on each of 4 wires, two each black and white. And stupidly I threw up beadboard over the hole before realizing there was an issue, so it'd be a severe pain to rip it off to get to the hole. There were no connections made, more like disconnections.
Ducowti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2005, 02:05 PM   #4
Contractor
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Jensen Beach, FL
Posts: 835
Default

electrical myster


Sounds like you disconnected the wrong wire or wires. I think that you're going to have to go back in and figure it out. Another option would be to string a new wire.
Teetorbilt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2005, 02:32 PM   #5
Electrical Contractor
 
jbfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Newnan GA
Posts: 5,782
Default

electrical myster


Also, You can not cover a splice box. It must always remain accessible, as you can see the problems that you have now!
__________________
Yes I am a Pirate, 200 years too late. "Jimmy Buffett"
jbfan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2005, 08:00 PM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 18
Default

electrical myster


Figured it out: each of the two colors needed to be connected, i.e. the two blacks and the two whites were soldered together.
Ducowti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2005, 04:02 PM   #7
Long-Time DIYer
 
Mike Swearingen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: On Albemarle Sound In Northeastern NC
Posts: 1,460
Default

electrical myster


What kind of outlet did you have in a bathroom on a 60 amp breaker? An electric heater or baseboard?
Regular bathroom circuits should be on a 15 amp breaker with 14/2-with-ground max or 12/2 wg on a 20 amp, GFCI-protected with a GFCI receptacle in the first outlet on the circuit, which will make all receptacles past it GFCI protected.
Good Luck!
Mike
Mike Swearingen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2005, 05:40 PM   #8
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 18
Default

electrical myster


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Swearingen
What kind of outlet did you have in a bathroom on a 60 amp breaker? An electric heater or baseboard?
Far as my unlearned eye could tell it was just an outlet right in the middle of the baseboard, i.e. it was cut out for the outlet.

Thanks for the replies all!
Ducowti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2005, 11:45 PM   #9
Member
 
jproffer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Chester, IL
Posts: 1,296
Default

electrical myster


I think I can safely speak for many of us when I say:

If you have a regular, standard, nothing special about it receptacle fed by a 60amp breaker, you need to call an electrician immediately if not sooner. Unless it's a special outlet, for a special purpose (like Mike S said, a baseboard heater for instance) it should NOT be fed with a 60 amp breaker...at all.....ever.
jproffer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2005, 07:51 PM   #10
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 18
Default

electrical myster


Quote:
Originally Posted by jproffer
I think I can safely speak for many of us when I say:

If you have a regular, standard, nothing special about it receptacle fed by a 60amp breaker, you need to call an electrician immediately if not sooner. Unless it's a special outlet, for a special purpose (like Mike S said, a baseboard heater for instance) it should NOT be fed with a 60 amp breaker...at all.....ever.
It's an old (~80+ yr) house that was upgraded at one time to what my uncle (an electric guy but not an electrician by trade) identified as having 60 amp service (to the whole house I believe, which seems consistent with the fact if I'm running two electric heaters at once the breaker trips periodically). I think a contractor I brought in also ID'd it as same when he took stock of the place a few months back.

Sounds pretty concerning by your reply; what's the danger with this? And why is this outlet a concern and others in the house not? (or are they too?!)
Ducowti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2005, 08:46 PM   #11
Member
 
jproffer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Chester, IL
Posts: 1,296
Default

electrical myster


I see...my apologies.

I read: "a 60 amp breaker feeding just regular receptacles"....my mistake
jproffer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2005, 09:07 PM   #12
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 18
Default

electrical myster


Quote:
Originally Posted by jproffer
I see...my apologies.

I read: "a 60 amp breaker feeding just regular receptacles"....my mistake
...which would be way high, right?
Ducowti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2005, 05:47 AM   #13
Member
 
jproffer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Chester, IL
Posts: 1,296
Default

electrical myster


VERY

Standard receptacles are usually rated for 15 amps, which means as long as more than one is being fed by a 20 amp breaker, you're fine. You can find, fairly easiily, a 20 amp receptacle, which is OK to be the only one on a 20 amp circuit. But the ones you normally find in a big bin at Wally-World, or a big box store for 40 or 50 cents are 15 amp receptacles. I can't think of many times (or maybe ANY times) I've seen more than a 20 feeding nothing but receptacles. There's no reason.

Don't forget also, the wire size is a factor. A 20 amp breaker MUST have 12 gauge conductors (or larger) coming from it, and leading to anything fed by it, directly or indirectly. For a 15 amp circuit, the minimum is 14 gauge. Personally I use 20 all over, then I know I'm safe, even if someone, someday changes a breaker from 15 to 20 (which they shouldn't without checking what they have first....but....it happens)

EDIT: I use 12 all over, not 20....12 gauge conductors...so it is upgradable to 20 amps :o


Last edited by jproffer; 05-26-2005 at 05:49 AM.
jproffer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What's the ICC Electrical Code? Chuck Electrical 7 02-20-2013 10:19 AM
Subpanel Questions/Running electrical to garage. FlyGuy Electrical 28 05-24-2008 10:50 PM
dishwasher electrical wire feb Electrical 31 04-12-2008 10:04 AM
Electrical continuity Tool Rze Electrical 11 10-01-2006 04:10 PM
Electrical receptacle replacement question sherlock Electrical 7 05-20-2005 03:33 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.