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Old 12-04-2012, 12:37 PM   #16
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Electrical diagramming questions


A couple of items you may already be aware of:

Dryer circuit requires 10/3 cable (+ ground) (30 amp) and a 4 wire receptacle.

Since this is a mobile home the panel in your home is a sub panel. All grounds and neutrals must be kept separate.
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Old 12-04-2012, 12:46 PM   #17
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Electrical diagramming questions


yes i am aware of that, thank you for telling me. We have done a lot of research on how to hook everything into the panel box, so we know where all of the wire goes, its just the matter of actually doing it now. I went last night and bought a 250' roll of 12-2 wire and 100' of 14-2, and some 10-2 so we can go ahead and finish all of the wiring except the dryer, which isnt hard since it is like four feet from the power box and that particular wire will run under the trailer in a conduit, which is how the wire was to begin with, and also how the stove wire was to begin with
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Old 12-04-2012, 12:58 PM   #18
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yes i am aware of that, thank you for telling me. We have done a lot of research on how to hook everything into the panel box, so we know where all of the wire goes, its just the matter of actually doing it now. I went last night and bought a 250' roll of 12-2 wire and 100' of 14-2, and some 10-2 so we can go ahead and finish all of the wiring except the dryer, which isnt hard since it is like four feet from the power box and that particular wire will run under the trailer in a conduit, which is how the wire was to begin with, and also how the stove wire was to begin with
If you have contiguous conduit from the panel to the box behind the dryer, run THHN/THWN #10 wire. 4 runs -2 black, 1 white, 1 green. Any electrical supply or big box will cut the lengths you need.
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Old 12-04-2012, 01:15 PM   #19
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Electrical diagramming questions


Yeah the conduit is attached to the trailer under the power box and runs under the floor joists to directly under the dryer plug, where it elbows up into the trailer floor and then the wire is free to run up the wall into the workbox. The stove wire is the same way, since it runs about thirty feet, there is a 1/2" conduit coming out of the trailer under the plug and it runs below the floor joists, all the way down the trailer and then elbows up into the power box, so there are actually three conduits extending into the power box, one for the stove, one for the dryer, and one from the power pole. Its always been that way and im thankful because nothing can disturb those power lines. especially that expensive thirty-foot 240 wire
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Old 12-04-2012, 02:37 PM   #20
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Electrical diagramming questions


You cannot use my previous suggestion of THHN wire since you do not have conduit the full run. You need to complete the conduit the whole way or use cable.
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Old 12-04-2012, 08:50 PM   #21
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Electrical diagramming questions


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Joed: Receptacles are on their own circuit, with 15amp breakers for everything except the kitchen, dryer and hot water heater. Lights are on their own circuit as well with 15amp breakers. My husband will not allow a hardwired fire alarm so we use the battery-operated ones.

jbfan: thanks, i know about the GFCI but not the AFCI. What is that?
A rc - F ault - C ircuit - I nterupter !
In laymans terms its a circuit breaker.
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Old 12-05-2012, 12:26 AM   #22
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A rc - F ault - C ircuit - I nterupter !
In laymans terms its a circuit breaker.
But a special kind of circuit breaker. Normal breakers open when an over-current condition occurs. AFCI breakers open when an arc ("spark") occurs.

According to Wikipedia:

Conventional circuit breakers only respond to overloads and short circuits; so they do not protect against arcing conditions that produce erratic, and often reduced current. An AFCI is selective so that normal arcs do not cause it to trip. The AFCI circuitry continuously monitors the current and discriminates between normal and unwanted arcing conditions. Once an unwanted arcing condition is detected, the AFCI opens its internal contacts, thus de-energizing the circuit and reducing the potential for a fire to occur. An AFCI should not trip during normal arcing conditions, which can occur when a switch is opened or a plug is pulled from a receptacle.[3]

AFCIs resemble a GFCI/RCD (Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupt/Residual-Current Device) in that they both have a test button although it is important to distinguish between the two. GFCIs and RCDs are designed to protect against electrical shock of a person, while AFCIs are primarily designed to protect against arcing and fire.
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