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Old 02-24-2009, 11:31 AM   #1
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Electrical Codes and Tips


I'm by no means an electrician but thought I would start this thread so everyone has a place to look for commonly asked electrical questions. So if I supply any incorrect information please pm me and I will edit it so others aren't mislead. Also please add to things I miss. It would be nice to list the common codes room by room to keep them organized for a quick reference.

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Old 02-24-2009, 11:41 AM   #2
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Here is a picture from another post supplied by Michael Thomas on the spacing of outlets in the kitchen.

There must be 2 circuits that are 20 amp and GFCI protected. The garbage disposal and dishwasher each need there own circuit.
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Last edited by ponch37300; 07-19-2009 at 05:04 PM.
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Old 02-24-2009, 12:01 PM   #3
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Any wall more than 2' has to have an outlet in it. Also any spot along the wall can not be more than 6' away from an outlet. So this means you need an outlet 6' from your door and then every 12' along the wall. They can be 15 amp circuits. I'm not positive but I believe they need to be on an arc fault circuit breaker. Here is a picture I drew, sorry it isn't as good as the kitchen pic!
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Old 03-16-2009, 10:31 AM   #4
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Quote:
Here is a picture from another post supplied by Michael Thomas on the spacing of outlets in the kitchen.

There must be 2 circuits that are 20 amp and GFCI protected and nothing else can be wired off these circuits. The garbage disposal and dishwasher each need there own circuit.
nuh uh....
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Old 03-16-2009, 10:58 AM   #5
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nuh uh....
What part? Like I mentioned I'm not an electrician and don't want to lead people wrong. Just trying to provide info I have read and was hoping others would chime in so we all can have a nice resource for what is needed for electrical in each room. If you find something wrong feel free to correct it instead of saying "nuh uh" or send me a message and I will edit it cause the last thing I intended was to give wrong info.
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Old 03-16-2009, 02:27 PM   #6
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well, you could put recepts in the kitchen, pantry, breakfast and dining room on those outlets...you can put a clock outlet on it...you can't put the hood, outside outlets or lighting on with these...as far as the dishwasher and disposal...i use one 20 amp circuit for both, as long as the load doesn't exceed 20 amps(which i haven't encountered one)...but check with your local code, they may require separate circuits... sorry about the nuh uh post
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Old 03-19-2009, 12:01 AM   #7
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In Canada, arc fault breakers req'd for bedroom plugs/lights only.
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Old 03-22-2009, 04:01 PM   #8
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In Canada, arc fault breakers req'd for bedroom plugs/lights only.
Don't quote me on this - but I've heard rumors that this was going to become a requirement for ALL residential breakers. Was on Global news late last year, haven't heard much since.
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Old 04-08-2009, 10:07 PM   #9
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Don't quote me on this - but I've heard rumors that this was going to become a requirement for ALL residential breakers. Was on Global news late last year, haven't heard much since.

I think in the US the NEC (National Elec. Code) and NFPA (National Fire Protection Assoc.) require all breakers be Arc Fault. They then have specific requirements for the minimum location of Ground Fault protected circuits.
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Old 04-08-2009, 11:50 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
I think in the US the NEC (National Elec. Code) and NFPA (National Fire Protection Assoc.) require all breakers be Arc Fault. They then have specific requirements for the minimum location of Ground Fault protected circuits.
The 2008 NEC requires all breakers 20amps and under in a residence to be arc fault protected.
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Old 07-16-2009, 06:19 PM   #11
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So, is this for new construction only, or am I expected to replace all the breakers in my 1950 ranch?
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Old 07-16-2009, 07:29 PM   #12
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This reminds me, my kitchen currently has no GFI outlet near the sink, just a regular. I should replace it with one. I don't think it's on it's own circuit though. I do have several circuits in the kitchen but they're all mixed around with other circuits in the house, it's kinda weird.


Also some more tips (gotten most from this forum actually, just thought I'd put all in one spot)

- Max devices (any point where power is accessible, ex: light, junction box, switch that also has feed going through, etc) per circuit: 12

- Wire sizes/amps:
14awg: 15A
12awg: 20A
10awg: 30A
8awg: 45A

- Color codes:

white: neutral
black: hot (120v)
red: hot (240v)
bare copper: ground

silver screws (ex plug) : neutral wire
gold screws: hot wire
green screws: ground


(someone correct me if I'm wrong on anything)

Last edited by Red Squirrel; 07-16-2009 at 07:33 PM.
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Old 07-17-2009, 09:52 PM   #13
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Maybe this thread could turn into some real wiring guidelines. I have been looking for this type of info so I know how to properly rewire my old house.

Starting with the panel, are there some general guidelines for new construction that say you are building a X sq ft house with Y bedrooms and Z baths, so this is how many breakers/circuits you would typically want and how they would be assigned?
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Old 07-17-2009, 10:05 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by tns1 View Post
Maybe this thread could turn into some real wiring guidelines. I have been looking for this type of info so I know how to properly rewire my old house.

That is what I was going for. A quick reference sticky for people that are doing electrical work. After 5 months I guess someone decided it was in the wrong section and moved it so now it's now a sticky and after a week it will be long gone and of no use to others.
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Old 07-17-2009, 11:12 PM   #15
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Another code I just found out recently.

- All outside walls including the ceiling where the attic is above must have plastic boxes and not metal. This is due to potential moisture that could rust out the box, I believe.

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