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Old 04-02-2009, 12:28 AM   #16
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Electrical Code in Chicago!?!


Personally I have intent on wiring at least part of my house in conduit when I replace the main panel. I like the ability to be able to add to it down the road and the fact that I don't need to run multiple pieces of romex down the same path when a few correctly calculated runs of conduit will do just fine. I already have the pipe benders for 1/2" and 3/4" that I have used quite a bit in the past.

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Old 04-02-2009, 02:11 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by theatretch85 View Post
Personally I have intent on wiring at least part of my house in conduit when I replace the main panel. I like the ability to be able to add to it down the road and the fact that I don't need to run multiple pieces of romex down the same path when a few correctly calculated runs of conduit will do just fine. I already have the pipe benders for 1/2" and 3/4" that I have used quite a bit in the past.
Jamie did his that way. Seems like a lot of work to me.
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Old 04-02-2009, 01:23 PM   #18
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Electrical Code in Chicago!?!


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I like the ability to be able to add to it down the road and the fact that I don't need to run multiple pieces of romex down the same path when a few correctly calculated runs of conduit will do just fine.
Goose-Nice to see you again!

This is exactly what I did in my house in anticipation of future remodelling of the upstairs. When I installed an HVAC unit in the attic, I located a wall space in which I ran the refrigerant and hot water lines. Instead of running a single raceway from the basement to the attic, I installed a rack of 4x3/4" EMT (the first of which I needed for the HVAC equipment, the latter of which were spare). These have been very handy as I can add circuits as I remodel and rewire the second floor.

In the attic, I ran a 2x3/4" EMT "backbone" from front to rear with 4-11's every 10 ft. Again, very handy as I continue to rewire and recircuit the upstairs.
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Old 05-05-2009, 10:34 AM   #19
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Electrical Code in Chicago!?!


... new here, hello! We are considering a purchase of an 4 square in Oak Park and would like some advice/input given the topic here. We've done renovations before but never a full rewire. This house needs it, the wiring is probably 1920's era knob & tube and if I had to guess I'd say it was put through the original gas lighting lines based on where the fixtures are on the walls. We've lived with K&T before, and it was a pain with blown fuses and such, so I'd like to just get this done and over with first. We are just starting purchase negotiations - what do you think the price point would be to rewire it? It's a 2 floor four square + unf. basement, 4bd, 1.5 bath. It will need a new circuit breaker and a new connection to the main electric lines - obviously we can't do that ourselves. What we are thinking is trying to a hire a journeyman to do that work as well as "direct" us in the fishing of the conduit and wires - is this possible, and would it save us some dollars? I assume the new connection will run us about $2000, the new box $1500, and the other materials (wire, etc) about $500... the journeymans time and some work another $3000. That brings me to $7000 for the project - I would assume by the time we are done and have permits/instpections another $500 and about 6 weeks worth of effort on our behalf. Does this sound like an achievable plan?? Is that cost estimate too low? How messed up are our walls going to be from holes? We have to gut the kitchens & baths anyways, so I don't care, I am just curious...
Thanks for any input.

Any input, thoughts appreciated.
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Old 05-04-2010, 04:46 AM   #20
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Electrical Code in Chicago!?!


to goose134: I could be misinformed, but another thing I've heard around the campfire is about your conduit fill. I hear that no matter WHAT size conduit you use, there's a maximum of only 9 conductors permitted. Meaning you could use a 1" stick of EMT and still only be allowed 9 14 AWG conductors. If so, does that count the neutral's as well? 2 circuits, 2 hot's 1 shared neutral=3 wires? Or only 2?
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Old 05-04-2010, 06:35 AM   #21
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lpf138, Moose made this one and one post almost two YEARS ago. According to his profile his last activity was one minute after making that lone post.
I think it is safe to say he will not be back around to see your reply.

It is always best to check the dates of the posts you are replying to.


Also, you were misinformed or misunderstand the 9 conductor idea with regard to conduit fill.
The thing is with #14 thru #10 conductors you can have up to nine current carrying conductors before you have to consider derating.
There is absolutely NO "9-conductor" limit.

This is just a very basic explanation. There are many other factors involved with regard to derating and conduit fill in general.
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Old 05-04-2010, 10:58 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by lpf138 View Post
to goose134: I could be misinformed, but another thing I've heard around the campfire is about your conduit fill. I hear that no matter WHAT size conduit you use, there's a maximum of only 9 conductors permitted. Meaning you could use a 1" stick of EMT and still only be allowed 9 14 AWG conductors. If so, does that count the neutral's as well? 2 circuits, 2 hot's 1 shared neutral=3 wires? Or only 2?

I realize this is an ancient post, but Petey, you are incorrect. Chicago only allows 9 wires in a pipe. Current carrying or not. This is one of the big differences I spoke of so long ago.
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Old 05-04-2010, 11:20 PM   #23
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Electrical Code in Chicago!?!


Wow. OK, good to know.
LPF did not mention his location so I just assumed he meant in general.

Thanks for the heads up.
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Old 05-05-2010, 02:26 AM   #24
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Sorry.. I found this thread through googling "What are the differences between the NEC and the Chicago code", so I assumed everybody was discussing that! Your right, I should have paid more attention. I understand what the NEC mandates about conduit fill.. And understand derating, and also box fill for that matter, just was curious about something that is now a confirmed difference. Possibly an odd one at that.. Anything else less that hasn't been covered? So far I know of basically:Pipe everything you can, if you use greenfield be sure to include a ground, 9 wires maximum, anything else? Anything different from the NEC about smoke alarms?
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Old 05-05-2010, 05:20 PM   #25
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Electrical Code in Chicago!?!


I don't know about smoke alarms. I don't do much residential, but I don't think you need AFCI protection, if that's what you're wondering.

Big differences are service masts must be rigid or IMC

Grounding Electrode conductor sizes also vary. NEC stops at 250 kcmil, I believe. Chicago continues the size calculations all the up. I've pulled a 600kcmil ground for a 4000 amp service before.

In commercial plenum ceilings, fixture whips must be flexible metallic TUBING. Otherwise known as plen-flex. Boxes must be stamped one piece variety with gasketed covers. Conduit fittings must be compression. Low voltage must also be piped. No plenum rated cable run in trays or rings.

These are the ones that leap to mind. I haven't worked outside Chicago in a while so I'd be pressed to remember more.
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Old 05-06-2010, 03:55 PM   #26
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Electrical Code in Chicago!?!


BTW, you don't need to pull the wire into a box to transition from flex to conduit. There are fittings that will allow you to attach flex directly to conduit.

No pipe bending needed either, you can just use flex for your corners instead with those fittings!
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Old 06-03-2010, 09:02 AM   #27
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What it's worth, at least as regards residential construction in Chicago, conduit bending is becoming an increasingly rare skill, much of the residential new work I see is done with the branch circuits in pre-bent turns with lots and lots of connectors - it's not pretty, and IMO it's not a really good idea because each connection adds a bit of resistance when you pull the wires and has the potential for a sharp edge if the pipe isn't reamed properly after cutting, but it needs code and the Chicago inspectors pass it.
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Old 06-03-2010, 11:01 PM   #28
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I'd be surprised if that were the case in new construction. A 90 is the easiest thing to do. Fittings and pre made bends are more expensive to do. More than likely what you're seeing is DIY with no desire to purchase a bender. Residential bending has never been about pretty, it is all about speed and efficiency. Pre-made 90's offer neither of these things.
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Old 06-03-2010, 11:54 PM   #29
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Goose .,

Hate to step in your spot but I have a question to ask you real quick due you are famuair with Metro Le Chicago codés speaking of premade 90° bend on half inch EMT are they are at standard bending radius or short bend radius ??

due I have one bender that I can make very short bend { I don't use it often unless it kinda last resort to use it.}

Merci,Marc
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Old 06-05-2010, 03:25 AM   #30
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Marc, the premade bends are almost identical to those you would make with a standard bender. I know of the bender you are referring to, the short radius bender. I've got conflicting information on whether or not the radius provided by the short radius bender is within code. I've never looked at NEC bending radius rules (if there are any). Nor have I measured the radius the bender provided.

That said, I've used them in a pinch and they can be a lifesaver when the time is right.

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