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Old 09-03-2009, 10:06 PM   #16
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Electrical Challenge! Can YOU Solve It?


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Originally Posted by Codywookman View Post
Your LEDs @12v will each need a dropping resistor. (12-2)v/.02 = 510 Ω at 1/4 w or 1/2 w.
You have a link to your 120 vac LEDs?


Last edited by Yoyizit; 09-03-2009 at 10:10 PM.
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Old 09-04-2009, 10:37 AM   #17
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Electrical Challenge! Can YOU Solve It?


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Originally Posted by Yoyizit View Post
Your LEDs @12v will each need a dropping resistor. (12-2)v/.02 = 510 Ω at 1/4 w or 1/2 w.
You have a link to your 120 vac LEDs?

Is it worth getting new LEDs with built in resistors?
What do you think about the 24VAC thermostat running a 12VDC circuit?
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Old 09-04-2009, 12:27 PM   #18
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Electrical Challenge! Can YOU Solve It?


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Is it worth getting new LEDs with built in resistors?
What do you think about the 24VAC thermostat running a 12VDC circuit?
Dunno' current prices on LEDs with integral resistors.
I'd think a 24 vac t'stat might take 24 vdc depending on its gizzards. I doubt the manuf. will give you an internal schematic so you can check it.
Can you post a prelim. system schematic? This sounds kind of muddled to me.

You should have the whole design fleshed out before you buy a single part. If you have some parts already the other parts may to be have changed to accommodate what you have so far. This kind of gets into when you're standing in Radio Shack with a calculator designing the thing while you're buying available parts. If you do that you can paint yourself into a corner because the last part is "unavailable" or made from unobtainium. Then you get to do the whole thing over again.

To avoid this you want to do "top-down design", going from the abstract to the literal. The last thing you write is the parts list.

This is for a working design. For a minimum cost working design you need component prices.

Last edited by Yoyizit; 09-04-2009 at 12:36 PM.
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Old 09-05-2009, 03:51 PM   #19
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Electrical Challenge! Can YOU Solve It?


if the t-stat is an electronic stat, it is going to require 24 volt power or whatever it is specifically rated for.. If it is merely a mechanical t-stat that is rated to be used on a 24 volt control, then it will also work on a 12 volt control system.

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