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Old 08-24-2009, 08:05 PM   #1
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Is there a way I can tell if I have 110 or 220 service?

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Old 08-24-2009, 08:07 PM   #2
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Where are you located? House, Apt or ?
Very few 120v only installations
It would have to be a very old installation

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Old 08-24-2009, 08:10 PM   #3
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Do you have a water heater, ac, stove, or electric furnance?
If so, then the odds are great you have a 240 volt service.
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Old 08-24-2009, 08:14 PM   #4
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I have a house and just had the wiring up dated, all new. No I am having a second floor washer dryer hook up The contractor said he would have to run 220 for the electric dryer. I thought I may have upgraded to 220. How do I know as to not get taken by the contractor. If I do have 220 would there be any additional wiring required?
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Old 08-24-2009, 08:16 PM   #5
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can't I just plug the dryer into the wall if I do have 220?
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Old 08-24-2009, 08:20 PM   #6
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The contractor if you are in the USA is giving you the straight and true. He will have to run a 220 volt dedicated line to the dryer on the second story all you probably have on that level now is 120 volt branch circuits
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Old 08-24-2009, 08:20 PM   #7
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120v plugs are different from 240v
If a 220/240v outlet was not run to this location then Yes new wire will need to be run
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Old 08-24-2009, 08:21 PM   #8
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If you are moving the dryer to another location in the house, then you will need a 240 receptacle for the dryer to operate.
You might be able to move the receptacle you have now to the new location.
If you do not trust this contractor, then you need to find another one.
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Old 08-24-2009, 08:25 PM   #9
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so Even if I do have 220 service I still need to be direct wired to the new dryer?
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Old 08-24-2009, 08:26 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzbutz4 View Post
can't I just plug the dryer into the wall if I do have 220?
If you talking about a typical wall receptacle please tell me what your drinkin so I can buy a case of it.


In the USA your home is served with both 120 volts and 240 volts there is a big difference though on the wiring to a receptacle that serves an electric dryer. These are dual voltage appliances requiring both 120 volts and 240 volts at the receptacle. This is done via a double pole breaker in the panel and running a #10 awg 3 conductor cable with ground to the dryer receptacle.
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Old 08-24-2009, 08:37 PM   #11
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Sorry if I sound stupid, I am when it comes to this stuff, thats why I'm here asking questions. Thats why I had everything updated. I couldn't iron clothes and have the airconditioning on at the same time without tripping the breaker.Im not sure exactly what your talking about most of the time but I guess thats why I'm not an electrition.
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Old 08-24-2009, 08:42 PM   #12
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No your not stupid but it is going to be pretty hard for you to decide if the contractor is on the level at your 'level' of knoweldge. IMO he is telling you what needs to be done.
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Old 08-24-2009, 08:45 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzbutz4 View Post
Sorry if I sound stupid, I am when it comes to this stuff, thats why I'm here asking questions. Thats why I had everything updated. I couldn't iron clothes and have the airconditioning on at the same time without tripping the breaker.Im not sure exactly what your talking about most of the time but I guess thats why I'm not an electrition.
It has nothing to do with being an electrician. It has to do with understanding the bare basics of building electrics.

Your service is 120/240v. This ALLOWS you to have 120, 240, or 120/240v circuits. Just because your house was "updated" (a word I can't stand I might add, because it is meaningless) does NOT mean you have the proper circuit run for an electric dryer.
Not all circuits in the house are the same, and unless you specifically paid to have a dryer circuit run it is highly unlikely that it will exist in the new dryer location.

If you can't trust that your contractor is being honest I strongly suggest you get a new contractor.
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Old 08-24-2009, 08:46 PM   #14
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120v = normal outlet - hot/neutral/ground

240v = special outlet - (2) hots (120v each) hot/hot/neutral/ground

120v + 120v = 240v & that's how you get 240v (220/230 also called)

This is a 240v plug - they are BIG


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