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Old 02-24-2012, 02:04 PM   #1
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how many outlets & lights are allowed in one breaker

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Old 02-24-2012, 03:52 PM   #2
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how many outlets & lights are allowed in one breaker
As many as you wish, use common sense.

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Old 02-24-2012, 04:04 PM   #3
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Are you in the US or Canada? It makes a difference. Is this residential?
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Old 02-24-2012, 07:04 PM   #4
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In Canada the limit is 12 outlets per circuit. If the circuit is lighting 15 amps is your limit.
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Old 02-24-2012, 07:29 PM   #5
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I believe according to the NEC (US electric code), the calculation is 1.5amps per load (basic light or receptacle) up to 80% of the rating of the circuit breaker.

So if you have a 20 amp circuit breaker, 80% is 16 amps, which allows you up to 11 receptacles or lights.
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Old 02-24-2012, 08:26 PM   #6
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There is no limit under the NEC for residential applications. The 80% loading would only come into play if the load was continuous for 3 hours or more.
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Old 02-24-2012, 09:56 PM   #7
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Quote:
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I believe according to the NEC (US electric code), the calculation is 1.5amps per load (basic light or receptacle) up to 80% of the rating of the circuit breaker.

So if you have a 20 amp circuit breaker, 80% is 16 amps, which allows you up to 11 receptacles or lights.
There is no 80% for lighting load, or receptacles. The 80% only comes into factor for certain loads. Now, the catch to that one is, when you figure total allowance on a circuit, you can safely load it in design up to 80% of the ocpd, before you start taking away from headroom, due to some people tend to leave lighting on in a room for long terms, or run a window a/c, computer, tv, etc. for more than a couple of min's or hours. If it is a well pump, or vent fan, yes you automatically have to figure in 80% of the load on the circuit, otherwise, that rule flies out the window for the majority of the circuits.
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Old 02-24-2012, 10:29 PM   #8
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Ah you're right. I looked back in my 2011 NEC. My bad.

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