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ndmick 06-04-2012 05:47 PM

Electric socket by shower
 
How far from a shower door should I go before putting in electric socket? I know I should use gcfi correct.How about my exhaust fan it says ok for shower should it be above the shower?It has a light also .

stickboy1375 06-04-2012 05:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ndmick (Post 936309)
How far from a shower door should I go before putting in electric socket?

Anywhere outside of the tub perimeter is fine. GFCI required.


Quote:

Originally Posted by ndmick (Post 936309)
How about my exhaust fan it says ok for shower should it be above the shower?It has a light also .

GFCI is only required IF the manufacture requires it... so read the manual for this answer.

rjniles 06-04-2012 05:55 PM

You can place a fan and/or light directly above the shower if it is GFCI protected.

stickboy1375 06-04-2012 05:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjniles (Post 936315)
You can place a fan and/or light directly above the shower if it is GFCI protected.

It only needs to be GFCI protected if the manufacture requires it.

gregzoll 06-04-2012 06:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stickboy1375 (Post 936320)
It only needs to be GFCI protected if the manufacture requires it.

Actually local codes can trump what you stated.

ndmick 06-04-2012 06:34 PM

Then should I wire the bath vent and light after a GCFI socket or run a separate line to it?Or use a GCFI breaker?

stickboy1375 06-04-2012 06:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 936334)
Actually local codes can trump what you stated.

Of course, but I don't have that amendment. And its a ridiculous amendment to begin with.

stickboy1375 06-04-2012 06:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ndmick (Post 936348)
Then should I wire the bath vent and light after a GCFI socket or run a separate line to it?Or use a GCFI breaker?

Using a GFCI will be cheaper, plus you can test/reset the GFCI if you install it in the bathroom with ease.

Red Squirrel 06-04-2012 09:10 PM

Regardless of what code or manufacturer says I think it's a smart idea to use a GFCI regardless. Then again I have a light above my shower that's not (it's sealed). For some reason the GFCI outlet in the same switch box does not like the timer switch I used so it trips. In a new construction situation I would definitely do it.

stickboy1375 06-04-2012 09:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Red Squirrel (Post 936521)
Regardless of what code or manufacturer says I think it's a smart idea to use a GFCI regardless. Then again I have a light above my shower that's not (it's sealed). For some reason the GFCI outlet in the same switch box does not like the timer switch I used so it trips. In a new construction situation I would definitely do it.

I guess I just look at it as being pointless, so I don't see the need for it.... With that said, it certainly won't hurt anything either.

Missouri Bound 06-04-2012 10:05 PM

Why is it pointless? GFCI's are required in damp or wet locations, right?

k_buz 06-04-2012 10:22 PM

Most bathfans I install (Broan/Nutone) have exposed receptacles under the trim, since this is a damp location, those would need the protection along with the motor.

stickboy1375 06-05-2012 06:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k_buz (Post 936562)
Most bathfans I install (Broan/Nutone) have exposed receptacles under the trim, since this is a damp location, those would need the protection along with the motor.

Ugh... really? Where in the NEC did you find that requirement? With that line of thinking, you wouldn't be able to install a fan in a shower area at all because of 406.8(C).

k_buz 06-05-2012 06:43 AM

Yeah, I pulled that one from my butt, but think about it...

The difference between a recessed light over a tub and a fan over the tub is the fact that shower trims are sealed so no moisture can get inside the can. Obviously fans are designed so air is allowed to get inside the trim.

You are correct that the NEC doesn't require GFI protection for exhaust fans over a shower/tub, but I just looked thru 5 Broan fans and all of them require GFI proyection over a tub or shower.

stickboy1375 06-05-2012 07:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k_buz (Post 936683)
Yeah, I pulled that one from my butt, but think about it...

The difference between a recessed light over a tub and a fan over the tub is the fact that shower trims are sealed so no moisture can get inside the can. Obviously fans are designed so air is allowed to get inside the trim.

You are correct that the NEC doesn't require GFI protection for exhaust fans over a shower/tub, but I just looked thru 5 Broan fans and all of them require GFI proyection over a tub or shower.

I think you're missin the point why gfci protection is required in general, it has nothing to do with moisture, in an application where the egc can be compromised, such as a corded tool and the ground pin being broken off, then gfci is required as a second means of protection, but when you have an exhaust fan or a recessed light where the EGC is not going to be compromised then why require it? Look at it this way, the fixture can't possibly be energized with the EGC in place, so no shock hazard is ever going to exist.. Hence the gfci protection is just not needed... Also, how many post lights or outdoor fixtures have you installed with gfci protection?


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