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organick 02-21-2011 05:14 PM

Electric motor help needed
 
I just bought a used delta 12 inch planer. I planed a few boards, seemed to be working fine. I turned it off, cut a few other boards and went to turn it back on but nothing. The switch (not original) was really loose so I changed it. still nothing. I bypassed the switch and got about a 5 second turn on at very low power. Unplugged, plugged back in, nothing again.

If i i let it sit long enough, maybe a half hour or so and plug it in I get the short turn on, one time even got about 20 seconds with what seemed like some sparking inside the housing......

Any ideas whats up? is the motor dying??

bob22 02-21-2011 06:03 PM

Might need a new start capacitor.

organick 02-21-2011 06:20 PM

how would I test that bob?? does the motor def. have one? i admit i know very little about motors. its also been suggested i change brushes? would you try that first?

bob22 02-21-2011 06:48 PM

get the model # of the saw from it; look it up in your owners' manual (or google it). You can get one (if it has one) from a local motor supply or via internet.
If (a BIG IF!), you can safety push the planer shaft somehow (not with fingers or things that can get caught or get thrown at you or others) to get it rolling a bit and then turn it on, it might help diagnose it. Usually, these are <$15 items so installing a new one is not the end of the world. Could be bad brushes (have to check your manual if they are replaceable, they likely are) and again, usually cheap and easy to replace. Post the model #.

nap 02-21-2011 06:57 PM

the first thing I would check is to be sure you are using the correct voltage.

post the information on the motor data plate so we know what kind of motor we are dealing with.

you might also try removing the drive belt and then trying to give he pulley a spin while turning it on. Be very cautious with this though.

bob22 02-21-2011 07:00 PM

Nap, he said he planed a few boards initially, so I'd assume it was correct voltage otherwise it wouldn't have run at all, correct?

nap 02-21-2011 07:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bob22 (Post 595312)
Nap, he said he planed a few boards initially, so I'd assume it was correct voltage otherwise it wouldn't have run at all, correct?

Not necessarily. Not that I have ever done it:whistling2: but I have seen a motor connected to an incorrect voltage appear to initially work fine until it was turned off and tried to restart. Smoked the centrifigul switch on a 240 motor when I juiced it with 480. It ran the first time though, really really well.:laughing:

there are other reasons a motor might appear to work on the voltage but cause problems as well.

Besides that, when trouble shooting, you just verify everything and starting with the voltage, it's about the simplest thing you can check.

organick 02-22-2011 07:27 AM

it def the right voltage its 110 15 amp, some of the plate on motor i cant read. it runs at 8,000 rpm.

everything spins pretty by hand.


so spin it a tiny bit and then give it juice? what should i look for then?

the brushes are replacable


its model 22-540 delta......pretty old

BigJim 02-22-2011 07:48 AM

Did you check the brushes?

organick 02-22-2011 08:50 AM

ok just pulled the brushes......one is worn down to 1/4 inch on one side 3/16ths on the other........the other brush still had about 1/2 inch but when i removed it was in 2 pieces split in half. Gonna assume thats not so good. Will order the brushes today.

nap 02-22-2011 11:54 AM

I guess I have to get out of the industrial mindset. When I was thinking of a planer, I was thinking more of something like this:

http://www.fries-beall-sharp-inc.com...H%20Planer.jpg

and when you say "old", your planer is not "old" compared to much of the equipment I work on. 1900 model year is old. 1964 is modern.:yes: Not sure the age of your planer but just from the design, I would say it isn't much more than toddler age:laughing:

yes, replace the brushes. Take a look at the commutator to be sure it isn't grooved badly or has segments smeared across the insulators.

BigJim 02-22-2011 06:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nap (Post 595721)
I guess I have to get out of the industrial mindset. When I was thinking of a planer, I was thinking more of something like this:

http://www.fries-beall-sharp-inc.com...H%20Planer.jpg

and when you say "old", your planer is not "old" compared to much of the equipment I work on. 1900 model year is old. 1964 is modern.:yes: Not sure the age of your planer but just from the design, I would say it isn't much more than toddler age:laughing:

yes, replace the brushes. Take a look at the commutator to be sure it isn't grooved badly or has segments smeared across the insulators.

I just broke out in a bad drool looking at the PM planer. Nap I agree the old tools just seem to last forever and run so smooth.


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