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markdcoco 06-15-2009 08:07 PM

electric motor cross reference
 
Gents,
Can any one tell me if there is a web site where I can cross reference an older electric motor part number... or where I can actually purchase an older electric motor (P/N: 5KCP39FG R251S)
Thank You,
Mark

300zx 06-15-2009 09:11 PM

Are you sure the part number is correct.Can't find any thing with that number.

micromind 06-15-2009 09:56 PM

That's most likely a GE motor. Part numbers are very hard to cross-reference. A lot of them belong to the manufacturer of the equipment that the motor is installed in. Also known as 'OEM numbers'.

If the motor has a frame number, (like 48 or 56), it will interchange with any other motor of the same frame. If there are letters along with the frame number, they could be important.

Any letter in front of a frame number means nothing. A 56 frame is identical to a B56. Letters following the frame number are important.

C = face mount. A race is machined on the shaft end, and it's designed to be bolted to a similar race on the driven machine.

H = Used on 56 frames, it means that there are a set of mounting holes at 3", and at 5".

J = Close-coupled pump. The shaft is threaded, and there's a race to mount the motor directly to the pump frame. The impeller threads onto the shaft. Usually found from 1/3 HP up to 50 HP.

T or U = These are standard mounting and shaft dimensions established by NEMA. U frames are older, T frames are more modern. Usually found from 1 HP to about 350 HP.

Y = Non-standard mounting. Usually found on pedestal fans and the like.

Z = Non-standard shaft. Usually a 56Z frame has a 1/2" shaft, 5/8" is standard. 56HZ usually has a 7/8" shaft, the 3" & 5" mounting holes.

If the motor is not a standard frame, it'll be hard to find a replacement that fits.

The standard frame sizes are 42, 48, 56, 143, 145, 182, 184, 213, 215, etc. Since a 215 frame is usually 10 HP, and this is a DIY site........I really didn't see any need to include something like 300 HP 447T frame!

Rob

J. V. 06-16-2009 10:12 AM

Try any of these manufacturer web sites below. They all have cross reference tools. As Rob stated above, many motors are proprietary to a certain company. Look hard at the name plate for any other numbers that might give us a hint as to the frame. If you get the wrong frame it will not fit where the old motor did. That for sure is a GE part number. Try calling GE first to find out if it's proprietary. If it is, ask them for the phone number of the owner. Then get a price from them.
Write down EVERYTHING on the nameplate. Rob or myself can see if the frame number is hidden in a bigger number, or a combination of numbers and letters. It could be in the serial number for example. So post all the nameplate information.

www.baldor.com
www.wegelectric.com

Both of these web sites have cross reference tools on board.

markdcoco 06-16-2009 02:30 PM

thank you
 
Gentlemen,
Thank you for a very timely and thorough response. The motor is a GE motor and it comes out of a Trane AC unit driving the fan on the outside cooling unit. I will first try the cross reference web sites. I attempted the same last night with others, with no success. If I don't have any further success today I will get some more information from the motor and impose on you for more assistance.
Thank you again...
Mark

Yoyizit 06-16-2009 02:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by markdcoco (Post 288410)
a Trane AC unit driving the fan on the outside cooling unit.

Get a motor that's designed for the high amb. temp. air that this motor will be seeing.
Motor life halves for each 10C rise above ambient.

markdcoco 06-16-2009 04:43 PM

GE Motor Info
 
Gents,
Thank you for all of your inputs. I have had no success trying to cross reference my motor, but have gotten the following information from the motor (from a Trane XE1000 AC Unit (circa '95)):

P/N: 5KCP39FG R251S
CPN: C140267P01
CL B INS CONT AIR OVER
THERMALLY PROTECTED
HZ = 60
PH = 1
RPM = 1075
HP = 1/5
V = 200-230
A = 1.5

Here is another number on it which I don't know is of any significance:
952690006323

There is a four (4) bolt mount on the back side. Not sure what the shaft diameter or length is.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Mark

Yoyizit 06-16-2009 04:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by markdcoco (Post 288477)
CL B INS CONT AIR OVER
THERMALLY PROTECTED
HZ = 60
PH = 1
RPM = 1075
HP = 1/5
V = 200-230
A = 1.5

If you know the shaft diameter and rotation direction Grainger can probably set you up with an electrically, and maybe even mechanically, equivalent drop-in replacement. You can go 1/5 hp or slightly larger.
Tell them the shaft has to be vertical. It supposedly makes a difference in the bearing construction.

Table 430.248 (table 9.2 in this link) is more pessimistic about the current draw for a motor this size
http://books.google.com/books?id=DDs...um=4#PPA123,M1
which makes me think, again, that the NEC uses 95th percentile values.

This motor is already only 50% efficient.

micromind 06-16-2009 09:06 PM

Post this on the HVAC forum. There's a few guys over there that work on these units regularly, they know more about HVAC motors than the rest of us.

Rob

J. V. 06-17-2009 11:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yoyizit (Post 288491)
If you know the shaft diameter and rotation direction Grainger can probably set you up with an electrically, and maybe even mechanically, equivalent drop-in replacement. You can go 1/5 hp or slightly larger.
Tell them the shaft has to be vertical. It supposedly makes a difference in the bearing construction.

Table 430.248 (table 9.2 in this link) is more pessimistic about the current draw for a motor this size
http://books.google.com/books?id=DDs...um=4#PPA123,M1
which makes me think, again, that the NEC uses 95th percentile values.

This motor is already only 50% efficient.

Grainger help select a proprietary motor replacement? You must not deal with Grainger very much. They cannot help anyone. You could call Burger King. Grainger sells parts and equipment. They help know one.

OP. You only have two options. 1, Call the manufacturer and order from them. 2, get a set of calipers and measure all the frame dimensions to see what you actually have. You also have a 6 pole motor. This even further complicates.

gillespj 06-27-2009 06:37 PM

Hey I need one of those motors to,mine is starting to make noise every so offten. Did you have any luck finding a replacment ,if so please let me know. I live near the I-17 and Happy Valley

markdcoco 06-28-2009 10:14 AM

AC Motor Replacement
 
The guys at Grainger crossed it to a Dayton 4M205G ($70) and the matching 5uF capacitor ($5). This is a four wire motor vs. the three wire GE I replaced. I wasted an hour attempting to wire it in using the three wire option with no success, but then chose the four wire installation and was done in five minutes. Works great. Beats the $400 I was quoted by a local AC company.
Mark

J. V. 06-28-2009 10:50 AM

Good job. This just serves as a lesson on specialty motors. They try to make it where you have to go to them for the replacement. I am surprised Grainger was able to help. In my dealings with them, no part number no part.

Yoyizit 06-28-2009 11:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by J. V. (Post 294113)
I am surprised Grainger was able to help. In my dealings with them, no part number no part.

Better reply. It avoids
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defamation

markdcoco 06-28-2009 11:34 AM

Grainger
 
I personally have never had a problem. Used them extensively to engineer repairs for some very old aerospace training equipment and always found them helpful. Saved my bacon this time. Part number was worthless. Gave them the specs from the motor label and they gave me a solution.


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