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Old 05-19-2013, 04:42 PM   #1
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Electric Meter vs. New Deck


I am in the early stages of planning for a deck on the back of my house. The image below shows the area for the deck. The red line will be the top of the deck surface, and the two green lines represent two options for the end of the deck and location of the railing against the house. As you can see, the lines are on either side of my home's electric meter. My question is whether either one of those green line options are allowed.

The left option allows for an unobstructed view of the meter from ground level, but also has the edge of the deck a few inches from it. The right option puts the meter inside the footprint of the deck, but will obviously have the meter itself just a few inches above the deck surface.

My third option is to actually have the meter moved to a different location. This would significantly increase the cost of the project, which is why I want to get an idea of all available options. So any help in this matter would be appreciated.


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Old 05-19-2013, 05:15 PM   #2
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Electric Meter vs. New Deck


Quote:
Originally Posted by sbazzle View Post
My question is whether either one of those green line options are allowed.
Options? Allowed for what?

Quote:
My third option is to actually have the meter moved to a different location.
The meter isn't really a concern.
The unfused wire coming into it from above is the factor to focus on.

Call your power company and ask about UNDERGROUND feeds.

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Old 05-19-2013, 05:27 PM   #3
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Electric Meter vs. New Deck


Check with your power company. I know one that does not allow meters over a deck.
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Old 05-19-2013, 06:28 PM   #4
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Electric Meter vs. New Deck


Quote:
Originally Posted by sbazzle View Post
I am in the early stages of planning for a deck on the back of my house. The image below shows the area for the deck. The red line will be the top of the deck surface, and the two green lines represent two options for the end of the deck and location of the railing against the house. As you can see, the lines are on either side of my home's electric meter. My question is whether either one of those green line options are allowed.

The left option allows for an unobstructed view of the meter from ground level, but also has the edge of the deck a few inches from it. The right option puts the meter inside the footprint of the deck, but will obviously have the meter itself just a few inches above the deck surface.

My third option is to actually have the meter moved to a different location. This would significantly increase the cost of the project, which is why I want to get an idea of all available options. So any help in this matter would be appreciated.

is that wire in conduit ???

left green line should make it grandfathered ....MAYBE

2) make the deck all the same level no step up ....IMHO ..LOL
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Old 05-19-2013, 06:41 PM   #5
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Electric Meter vs. New Deck


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is that wire in conduit ???

left green line should make it grandfathered ....MAYBE

2) make the deck all the same level no step up ....IMHO ..LOL

I'm not a sparky and too comfortable right now to grab my code reference sheet, but don't you need about 10' clearance from a walking surface for your weatherhead???? Looks like it might be close.

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Old 05-19-2013, 07:50 PM   #6
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Electric Meter vs. New Deck


weather head is above the roof ..... about 3 feet .....FYI
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Old 05-19-2013, 08:29 PM   #7
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Electric Meter vs. New Deck


The required clearance is from the lowest part of the drip loop, not the weatherhead.
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Old 05-19-2013, 08:44 PM   #8
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NO ..... nothing to do with drip loops ....

230.9 Clearance From Building Openings

230.9 Clearance From Building Openings
(A) Clearance From Windows. Overhead service conductors must maintain a clearance of 3 ft from windows that are designed to be opened, doors, porches, balconies, ladders, stairs, fire escapes, or similar locations. Figure 230-7 230-09A.cdr
Exception: Overhead conductors run above a window are not required to maintain the 3 ft distance.

(B) Vertical Clearance. Overhead service conductors must maintain a vertical clearance of not less than 10 ft above platforms, projections or surfaces from which they might be reached [230.24(B)]. This vertical clearance must be maintained for 3 ft measured horizontally from the platform, projections or surfaces from which they might be reached.
(C) Below Opening. Service conductors cannot be installed under an opening through which materials might pass, and they must not be installed where they will obstruct entrance to building openings. For example, the upper opening in a barn loft is often used to move hay in or out of the loft storage area. Figure 230-8 230-09C.cdr


and

230.24 Clearances
Service-drop conductors must be located so that they are not readily accessible, and they must comply with the following clearance requirements:
(A) Above Roofs. Overhead service conductors must maintain a minimum clearance of 8 ft above the surface of a roof for a minimum distance of 3 ft in all directions from the edge of the roof.

Exception No. 2: Where the voltage does not exceed 300V between conductors, overhead conductor clearances from the roof can be reduced from 8 ft to 3 ft, if the slope of the roof exceeds 4 in. in 12 in.
Exception No. 3: If the voltage between conductors does not exceed 300V, the conductor clearance over the roof overhang can be reduced from 8 ft to 1.5 ft, if no more than 6 ft of overhead conductors pass over no more than 4 ft of roof overhang, and the conductors terminate at a through-the-roof raceway or approved support. Figure 230-10 230-24Ax3.cdr

Exception No. 4: The 3 ft vertical clearance that extends from the roof does not apply when the point of attachment is on the side of the building below the roof.
(B) Clearances. Overhead conductor spans for system not over 600V must maintain the following clearances: Figure 230-11 230-24B.cdr
(1) 10 ft at the electric service entrance to buildings, at the lowest point of the drip loop of the building electric entrance, above finished grade, sidewalks, or platform or projection from which they might be accessible to pedestrians, where the voltage is not in excess of 150V to ground.
(2) 12 ft above residential property and driveways, and those commercial areas not subject to truck traffic, where the voltage does not exceed 300V to ground.
(3) 15 ft above those areas listed in the 12 ft classification, where the voltage exceeds 300V to ground.
(4) 18 ft over public streets, alleys, roads, parking areas subject to truck traffic, driveways on other than residential property, and other areas traversed by vehicles such as cultivated, grazing, forest, and orchard. Department of Transportation (DOT) type right of ways in rural areas are many times used by slow-moving and tall farming machinery to avoid impeding traffic flow.

(D) Swimming Pools. Service conductors above pools, diving structures, observation stands, towers, or platforms must comply with 680.8.
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Old 05-19-2013, 08:47 PM   #9
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Electric Meter vs. New Deck


read [b](1) in 230.24
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Old 05-19-2013, 08:51 PM   #10
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Electric Meter vs. New Deck


Quote:
Originally Posted by Techy View Post
read [b](1) in 230.24

"The 3 ft vertical clearance that extends from the roof does not apply when the point of attachment is on the side of the building below the roof"

not valid here since the service is roof top through a pole as stated ...
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Old 05-19-2013, 08:55 PM   #11
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This is the part I was addressing.

Quote:
I'm not a sparky and too comfortable right now to grab my code reference sheet, but don't you need about 10' clearance from a walking surface for your weatherhead???? Looks like it might be close.
From your post

Quote:
(B) Clearances. Overhead conductor spans for system not over 600V must maintain the following clearances: Figure 230-11 230-24B.cdr
(1) 10 ft at the electric service entrance to buildings, at the lowest point of the drip loop of the building electric entrance, above finished grade, sidewalks, or platform or projection from which they might be accessible to pedestrians, where the voltage is not in excess of 150V to ground.
(2) 12 ft above residential property and driveways, and those commercial areas not subject to truck traffic, where the voltage does not exceed 300V to ground.
It seemed like they were worried someone could touch the triplex or SE from the proposed deck, not the portion over the roof.
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Old 05-19-2013, 08:59 PM   #12
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Electric Meter vs. New Deck


LOL i answered him in post #6 ....


all those thing are based on .......

First and formost .....

Exception No. 4: The 3 ft vertical clearance that extends from the roof does not apply when the point of attachment is on the side of the building below the roof

everything else is moot for this ...
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Old 05-19-2013, 09:18 PM   #13
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Exception 4 does not apply to (B) or any other portions below (B). The exceptions apply to the portions above the exception.
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Old 05-19-2013, 09:20 PM   #14
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no, that is 230.24 (A) Exception # 4, We're talking about 230.24(B)(1)
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Old 05-19-2013, 09:36 PM   #15
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Electric Meter vs. New Deck


check with your POCO meter issues are their domain. Our POCO requires a minimum of three feet to center of meter base.

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