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Old 01-09-2011, 06:49 AM   #1
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i am replacing 3 outlets i removed old one and replaced with new one after doing this none work i m pritty sure i plced the wires back to the rite sides of the outlets but still have proble one outlet is controlled by a switch in the box it has it has 3 romex wires with 1 black 1 white and a ground in this outlet box they have 2 black and 1 white grouped together and remaining wires attached to the outlet this is where the problem is i think why are the wires grouped together when they are different colors

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Old 01-09-2011, 07:37 AM   #2
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The white would be what they call part of a "Switch Leg". I would suggest getting a good book for Electrical, such as Black & Decker's.

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Old 01-09-2011, 07:45 AM   #3
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This is the accepted way of wiring a switch leg.The white wire grouped with the black wires will go hot to the switch and the black from the switch will come back switched.Be sure to put the black wire to the brass coloured screw on the receptacle and the white wire to the silver screw. If you would like half of that receptacle to be hot all the time (not switched) let us know and we can tell you how to do that.
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Old 01-09-2011, 08:13 AM   #4
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Did you put it back the way you found it, including combining that white wire with those two blacks?

If you are unable to put it back exactly because you forgot how, you will need to do a lot of extra troubleshooting using a multimeter. A long single wire (that can reach between the various outlets you were working on) will help.

Caution: Do not turn the power on until you get it right.

Which (if any) of the outlets are supposed to be controlled by a wall switch? You must find out which cable (with black/white pair) goes to a switch before turning the power back on.
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Last edited by AllanJ; 01-09-2011 at 08:20 AM.
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Old 01-09-2011, 02:58 PM   #5
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Did you put it back the way you found it, including combining that white wire with those two blacks?

If you are unable to put it back exactly because you forgot how, you will need to do a lot of extra troubleshooting using a multimeter. A long single wire (that can reach between the various outlets you were working on) will help.

Caution: Do not turn the power on until you get it right.

Which (if any) of the outlets are supposed to be controlled by a wall switch? You must find out which cable (with black/white pair) goes to a switch before turning the power back on.
i i segragated the 3 romex cables white from switch black from powere and out are grouped together how do i connect remaining wires to out let
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:08 PM   #6
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i segragated the three romex lines in my outlet box white from switch black out and black power grouped together now where do i connect remaining wires i have two white and one black this outlet is controlled by switch
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:28 PM   #7
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You will need to find the romex for the switch. Make sure that you color the white from it with a black sharpie to distinguish that it is a Black. The true black of the romex from the switch would go to the brass screw on the outlet, the white which is now colored with the sharpie connects to the black hot feed, with a pigtail going to the outlet. This means that both halves of the outlet are controlled by the switch.

If you are only wanting one half of the outlet controlled by the switch, you would have the white from the hot feed on the top half of the outlet (make sure you break the tab on hot side of the outlet), Black from the hot feed would be in a "pigtail" with the white (colored with the black sharpie), pigtail connects to top brass screw. The black from the switch would connect to the bottom brass screw (this means that the ground would be on the bottom when looking at the outlet).

So in review, white from the hot feed to the silver screw, black feeds the pigtail of the wire that goes to the top brass screw, and the white lead colored with the sharpie that goes to the switch, and black from the switch to the bottom brass screw. Again, go get Black & Decker's "The Complete Guide to Home Wiring". It has good diagrams of pretty much most light & outlet setups. The newest version after April will highlight the 2011 NEC.
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:55 PM   #8
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i segragated the three romex lines in my outlet box white from switch black out and black power grouped together now where do i connect remaining wires i have two white and one black this outlet is controlled by switch
From this point, connect the two whites to the two silver screws on one side of the outlet (receptacle) set. This provides neutral to this outlet set and also out to the next box.

Connect the remaining black (from the switch) to one gold screw on the outlet.
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Old 01-09-2011, 04:30 PM   #9
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By code, you cannot use both screws for the white or black as a passthrough/junction point. You need to use Pigtails.
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Old 01-09-2011, 05:26 PM   #10
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By code, you cannot use both screws for the white or black as a passthrough/junction point. You need to use Pigtails.
I was under the impression that was for MWBC only ?
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Old 01-09-2011, 05:29 PM   #11
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I was under the understanding, that it is not code approved, since outlets are not rated as pass through devices, since Pigtails are a better way of securing the wires. I have always used Pigtails on all of my outlets, which is the way I was taught by my father to do so, and how we were told to do so in the Navy.
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Old 01-09-2011, 05:44 PM   #12
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Even 15a outlets are rated as 20a pass thru
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Old 01-09-2011, 06:44 PM   #13
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Even 15a outlets are rated as 20a pass thru
I totally understand that. I was always taught to not use them as passthroughs, because it just makes things harder, unless you are working with switched outlets. Always taught "KISS".
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Old 01-09-2011, 06:55 PM   #14
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Pigtailed neutrals are only required for a MWBC.
A single circuit can use the screws to carry to the next receptacle.
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Old 01-09-2011, 06:56 PM   #15
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I totally understand that. I was always taught to not use them as passthroughs, because it just makes things harder, unless you are working with switched outlets. Always taught "KISS".
What does it make harder?

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