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Old 10-30-2008, 08:15 AM   #1
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I have a outlet with breaker on doublewide that will not stay reset ! Can I just replace outlet or is there a problem somewhere else ??

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Old 10-30-2008, 09:13 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by Little B View Post
I have a outlet with breaker on doublewide that will not stay reset ! Can I just replace outlet or is there a problem somewhere else ??

Sorry I dont totally understand what you have going on? But if you have a breaker that is not reseting I would suggest getting an electrican over to check it out.

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Old 10-30-2008, 11:17 AM   #3
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Have you been nailing or screwing in things? cutting? What do you mean by "doublewide" you mean its double the size of the other ones? we call these "double pole"

Id get an electrician to check this out.

YOU SHOULDN'T DO IT!

Last edited by rgsgww; 10-30-2008 at 01:37 PM.
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Old 10-30-2008, 12:55 PM   #4
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I have a outlet with breaker on doublewide that will not stay reset ! Can I just replace outlet or is there a problem somewhere else ??
With the breaker off, put a 100w incandescent lamp across the contacts using a lamp socket with pigtail leads. Now you have replaced the breaker with a current source of sorts that doesn't mind a short circuit.

If the bulb glows full brightness you're looking for a dead short.

If not, you're looking for an overload (check the voltage across the bulb).

If you find neither, the breaker has loose contacts, bad contacts or is otherwise defective.
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Old 10-30-2008, 01:11 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Yoyizit View Post
With the breaker off, put a 100w incandescent lamp across the contacts using a lamp socket with pigtail leads. Now you have replaced the breaker with a current source of sorts that doesn't mind a short circuit.

If the bulb glows full brightness you're looking for a dead short.

If not, you're looking for an overload (check the voltage across the bulb).

If you find neither, the breaker has loose contacts, bad contacts or is otherwise defective.
Are you seriously telling him to remove the breaker and do this?????
First off, do you really think he has a pigtail socket laying around?
Second, after the way he asked this question do you really think he should be messing around in a live panel???????


Little B, PLEASE, for your safety and your family's, call an electrician.
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Old 10-30-2008, 01:15 PM   #6
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I agree with speedy I wouldn't have him do that
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Old 10-30-2008, 01:38 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoyizit View Post
With the breaker off, put a 100w incandescent lamp across the contacts using a lamp socket with pigtail leads. Now you have replaced the breaker with a current source of sorts that doesn't mind a short circuit.

If the bulb glows full brightness you're looking for a dead short.

If not, you're looking for an overload (check the voltage across the bulb).

If you find neither, the breaker has loose contacts, bad contacts or is otherwise defective.
Do you actually do this? What does molten copper feel like in your eyes?
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Old 10-30-2008, 01:43 PM   #8
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I'm guessing that Little B's "outlet with breaker" is a GFI outlet.

Also agree that LB should stay out of the panel box.

Now, "doublewide"; is that a trailer??
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Old 10-30-2008, 02:25 PM   #9
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Do you actually do this? What does molten copper feel like in your eyes?
Do not remove the breaker.

Pick up the 120v at some convenient and safe place upstream of the breaker. The other lead goes to the breaker screw terminal.

Do not short out anything; you may already have.

Buy the lamp socket with pigtail leads at any hardware store.

In my defense, I have heard of places that routinely check the wiring before closing any breakers by putting a lamp in series. They had a name for the test, but I forget.
If the person who made that post is present, please make yourself known.

I have heard of electricians covering their faces before they close the breakers on a new job. Don't you think this method is a little more "kinder and gentler (and maybe even safer; no exploding breakers with this. . .)"?

It is worth anyone's while to rig up a test fixture like this; do whatever you need to to make it safe by your standards. You can also use it to test GFIs.

Now that I have everyone's attention, how does a licensed professional electrician pursue this troubleshooting job?
What step first?
What second?

BTW:
People electrocuted in the U.S. each year: 1300.
Likelihood of an adult being electrocuted in one year: =~1300/200,000,000 = 1 chance in 150,000.
Chance of a 40-year-old male dying within a year from any cause: 1 in 100, about the same as your house burning to the ground within a year, from any cause.

Do any of you ride motorcycles? Do you know your odds of surviving even a minor cycle accident?
Do you smoke? Ski?
Use a table saw without a guard?

I don't think the OPs question shows anything about his level of skill or experience or how well he will inform himself before pursuing this further. That is all yet to be determined. This forum advises and informs: it's his/her judgement call.
Regardless, the odds are certainly in his/her favor.

Last edited by Yoyizit; 10-30-2008 at 02:36 PM.
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Old 10-30-2008, 03:11 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoyizit View Post

BTW:
People electrocuted in the U.S. each year: 1300.
Likelihood of an adult being electrocuted in one year: =~1300/200,000,000 = 1 chance in 150,000.
Chance of a 40-year-old male dying within a year from any cause: 1 in 100, about the same as your house burning to the ground within a year, from any cause.

Do any of you ride motorcycles? Do you know your odds of surviving even a minor cycle accident?
Do you smoke? Ski?
Use a table saw without a guard?
W - T - F does this have to do with ANYTHING?????
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Old 10-30-2008, 03:14 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoyizit View Post
With the breaker off, put a 100w incandescent lamp across the contacts using a lamp socket with pigtail leads. Now you have replaced the breaker with a current source of sorts that doesn't mind a short circuit.

If the bulb glows full brightness you're looking for a dead short.

If not, you're looking for an overload (check the voltage across the bulb).

If you find neither, the breaker has loose contacts, bad contacts or is otherwise defective.
Good god man.... this is a diy site.
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Old 10-30-2008, 05:59 PM   #12
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Yoyizit, wouldn't testing the resistance be easier and a whole lot safer?
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Old 10-30-2008, 07:19 PM   #13
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I have a outlet with breaker on doublewide that will not stay reset ! Can I just replace outlet or is there a problem somewhere else ??
The wiring system in tour mobile home is basically the same as a house. The difference is in the receptacles they use. I find them very difficult to troubleshoot.

Your circuit starts at the breaker and goes from recep to recep, switch, light etc. The problem could be anywhere along that circuit.

Step 1) Identify every recep and switch that is not working. Use a lamp if you don't have a tester. You should get an idea of how the circuit is wired by using some logic.

Step 2) Turn off every switch and unplug everything on that circuit.

Step 3) Check the wiring at the panel for any obvious signs of burning. Turn the breaker all the way off and back on. If it comes on, turn the lights on one by one. If it's still on, plug things in carefully one by one. If it still trips ......

Step 4) Start pulling out all receps and switches looking for obvious signs of burned components. If you find nothing obvious you need to go deeper.

Step 6) Call someone.

They will disconnect the wiring midway in the circuit to determine which half the fault is on. If it clears, it's in the second half. Wash, rinse and repeat.

All the mobile homes I have seen use a recep that clips onto the cable and attaches to a special box so good luck with that. The last one I did, I had to replace the receps and boxes with standard residential boxes/receps.


Quote:
I'm guessing that Little B's "outlet with breaker" is a GFI outlet.
Gah!!. I wish I would have read that before I oposted all my blah blah blah

Could be a faulty GFCI, could be a fault. Either way, your job just got easier.

Last edited by 220/221; 10-30-2008 at 07:24 PM.
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Old 10-30-2008, 08:34 PM   #14
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Yes, it would be helpful if the OP would clarify. Little B???
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Old 10-30-2008, 09:22 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by rgsgww View Post
Yoyizit, wouldn't testing the resistance be easier and a whole lot safer?
Yes, if your ohmmeter can read fractions of an ohm.
If you have #12AWG and you read 1.5 ohms, your dead short is 25' from the breaker, assuming the short doesn't change when 120v is not applied. With #14 the short is 30' from the breaker.

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