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Old 09-08-2006, 08:45 AM   #1
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Dryer wiring


I don't know anything about loads or amps and would just like to know if having a dryer wired to a 40 amp breaker with 10/2 wire is okay or should it be changed to a 30 amp breaker?

We just bought a house and I found the dryer is on a 40 amp breaker.

Thanks in advance for your answers.

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Old 09-08-2006, 10:32 AM   #2
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Dryer wiring


You need to use 10/3 wires for dryer for 30 amp breaker. that's the standard in Toronto, I also don't know anything before I wired my basement dryer, I just open up a HD wiring book, look at how they connecting to a outlet... and that is it... no big deal...

if you use 40 am breaker...

you probably need to use thicker wires, instead of 10/3, you probably need to go for 8/3 that I am not sure ...

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Old 09-08-2006, 03:17 PM   #3
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Dryer wiring


10/3NM on a 2-pole 30 amp breaker is the industry standard for American electric dryers.

#10 on a 40 amp breaker is illegal 99% of the time. #10 is limited to 30 amps.
10/2 was NEVER legal or safe to use for such a circuit. You MUST have a neutral which 10/2 does not, and did not, provide.
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Old 09-10-2006, 11:13 PM   #4
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Dryer wiring


1st of all, check the dataplate on the back of the dryer to see what it's Full-Load Amp (FLA) rating is. This is what the maximum designed amp rating is should everything electrical be maxed out. If there's a LRA (Locked-Rotor Amp) rating included, it's the total of the FLA, + the additional load of the any motors that are "locked-up", thereby creating an additional load. This info is what you use to determine the size of both the wire, & the breaker/fuses to use.

If it's rated for 30Amps, you must use 10-3/ground AWG. If it's 40 amps, then you must use 8-3/ground. In either case, be sure that the wire contains 1 black, 1 red, 1 white, & 1 bare copper wire. In addition, these wires will be aluminum, so be certain to use anti-oxidation paste on the ends of the wires where they contact the "keepers" in the recepticle, as well as under the contacts on the breaker(s).

When selecting the breaker for your panel, be sure to choose one with a "common trip" feature. This is a small bar that conects both of the breakers handles to one another. This is to ensure that should one leg of power be at fault in the circuit, that both legs will "trip" simultaneously. This is true for any 240v. 1 phase appliance, be it a dryer, stove, air conditioner, etc.
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Old 09-11-2006, 06:31 AM   #5
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Dryer wiring


Whoa!
Pilot, some of this is a bit off base. A circuit rated for 30 amps uses #10cu. You make it seem if the rating plate says 30 to use #10. This is a bit confusing, especially to a DIYer.

Also, you say to use 10/3 or 8/3, then say they WILL be aluminum. They will likely NOT be AL, but will be copper. And the sizes of wire mentioned MUST be copper compared to the circuit sizes.

The OP should re-wire this with 10/3nm on a two-pole 30 amp breaker, and a new 4-wire receptacle and cord.
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Old 09-11-2006, 09:01 AM   #6
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Dryer wiring


I guess I should elaborate a little more on the wiring. I am just assuming it is 10/2 with a ground which makes it 10/3. The casing on the wire has no numbers. The casing is black and all other wiring is in yellow casing. The black wire seems a little larger than the yellow wire so I was thinking it was probably 10/3, that is if the yellow wire is 12/3, I guess it could be 14/3. None of them have any markings on them. The yellow wiring is used on all other circuits: (15amp)

Thanks for the replies.
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Old 09-11-2006, 09:23 AM   #7
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Dryer wiring


Speedy,

Perhaps that's what you'll find in NY, but I can assure you, that here, if you tell the people at Lowe's/Home Depot (which is where the avg. DIY'r is going to be limited to purchasing such wire), that you want the cable for a dryer, what you'll get is going to be aluminum. Beyond that point of clarification, I agree with you.

For the record, I'm a licensed electrical, & HVAC contractor, & have been so in excess of 20 years. I'm also a residential general contractor, & operate my own home repair/renovation business. I have extensive experience in all phases of home construction, & repair.

The single best piece of advice that I can think of to give anybody attempting do do anything as potentially dangerous as electrical work, is this:

If you're not 100% comfortable, & knowledgable about what you're doing,...call a professional!

The death of you, or a loved one, due to electrocution, or a house fire, isn't worth the money you thought you were saving.

On that, I'm sure we can both agree.
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Old 09-11-2006, 09:46 AM   #8
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Dryer wiring


Quote:
Originally Posted by jasjks View Post
I guess I should elaborate a little more on the wiring. I am just assuming it is 10/2 with a ground which makes it 10/3. The casing on the wire has no numbers. The casing is black and all other wiring is in yellow casing. The black wire seems a little larger than the yellow wire so I was thinking it was probably 10/3, that is if the yellow wire is 12/3, I guess it could be 14/3. None of them have any markings on them. The yellow wiring is used on all other circuits: (15amp)

Thanks for the replies.
The yellow jacketed wire is 12/2 NM with ground (3 conductors in total). 14/2NM w/ground is still in a white jacket. All of those wires DO have there size imprinted in the jacket,...but quite often it does require an eagle's vision to see it,...but trust me, it's there. Personally, I think they should print it in a contrasting color to make it easier to see, but too often, it's just stamped into the existing color of the jacket, which is what makes it so hard to see.

If it's 10/2 that you have, then you should have 1 black, 1 white, & 1 bare ground wire. That's NOT what you want for a dryer.

You need, as earlier stated depending on the amp rating, 10/3 with ground (substitute 8 for the 10 in the case of a 40 amp rating), which will have 1 red, 1 black (or in some cases, it may be 2 black conductors, but in that case, 1 of them should have a white stripe, or other similar marking on it), 1 white, & 1 bare ground wire(s). In total, there will be 4 conductors inside the outer jacket. The red, & black are your current carrying conductors (240v), the white is the neutral conductor, & the bare wire, is the ground.

The 1st number denotes the AWG wire size, the 2nd number denotes the number of current carrying conductors, not including the ground wire, that are contained within the jacket.

I hope this has helped.
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Old 09-11-2006, 05:33 PM   #9
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Dryer wiring


Quote:
Originally Posted by PilotusAmazingus View Post
Perhaps that's what you'll find in NY, but I can assure you, that here, if you tell the people at Lowe's/Home Depot (which is where the avg. DIY'r is going to be limited to purchasing such wire), that you want the cable for a dryer, what you'll get is going to be aluminum.
I find this VERY surprising. It is very rare to use aluminum for less than a 40 amp circuit. From the years I have spent on these boards I have almost never heard of using AL for a NEW dryer circuit. 10/3nm-g copper is the gold standard across the country. I guess not in NC though.
Old circuits are a different story.

In any case your amperage numbers are still off. You cannot use #10AL for a 30 amp circuit. You MUST use #8 or larger.
For 40 amps it is less clear. #8al NM cable (if it even still exists) is only good for 30 amps, while #8al SER cable is good for 40 amps. Maybe this is what you are using?
I don't see much #8al SER around here. #6 and larger is very common.

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