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Old 12-23-2015, 11:10 PM   #1
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Downlight in eaves


I've been trying to find out what products are often used to create a recessed downlight in eaves, and what the prices are. My inexperienced search only turned out a product which was about $70/light, which seems awfully expensive.

So, what do people use to create recessed downlights in eaves? Could anyone point me to some reasonably priced products, LED-based? Do these involve a can, or are they simply drill, pop-through, clip, and caulk?

My house is single floor, and I'm not sure how many lumens the light should be (would 120 degrees / 250 lumens be sufficient?). I noticed that the current (non-bleeding-edge) performance in LED bulb replacements for halogen is about 60 lumens per watt, which would give me close to 300 lumens at 5 watts per light.

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Old 12-23-2015, 11:38 PM   #2
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Sorry, above I meant (would 30 degrees / 250 lumens be sufficient?) not 120 degrees. For some reason I've lost the ability to edit my post (I thought that was possible before). It may just be a temporary issue.

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Old 12-24-2015, 04:30 AM   #3
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The same housing is used as for inside the house..you may have trouble finding a housing shallow enough to fit under the roofline .

The 30 degrees is the beam spread of the light. How bright do you want your house?
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Old 12-24-2015, 07:53 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by injvstice View Post
I've been trying to find out what products are often used to create a recessed downlight in eaves, and what the prices are. My inexperienced search only turned out a product which was about $70/light, which seems awfully expensive.

So, what do people use to create recessed downlights in eaves? Could anyone point me to some reasonably priced products, LED-based? Do these involve a can, or are they simply drill, pop-through, clip, and caulk?

My house is single floor, and I'm not sure how many lumens the light should be (would 120 degrees / 250 lumens be sufficient?). I noticed that the current (non-bleeding-edge) performance in LED bulb replacements for halogen is about 60 lumens per watt, which would give me close to 300 lumens at 5 watts per light.
Halo H7 housings are rated for damp locations which is what under the eaves would be considered. They cost around 10 dollars at an electrical supply house. You can use LED bulbs in them. The H7RT are for remodel and the H7T are for new construction. You will need at least 8" of clearance behind.
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Old 12-24-2015, 09:17 AM   #5
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I'd use Halo H99 cans, the 4" ones, with LED trims.
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Old 12-24-2015, 09:48 AM   #6
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If you are in a cold climate, undereave lighting could melt roof snow and cause ice dams.
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Old 12-24-2015, 10:20 AM   #7
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If you are in a cold climate, undereave lighting could melt roof snow and cause ice dams.
I guess you haven't heard about global warming? It is Christmas Eve and 70 degrees. Not much chance for snow or ice.
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Old 12-24-2015, 11:36 AM   #8
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What type of under eave lighting effect are you trying to achieve. Some people are trying to brightly light the entire facade. At the other end of the range, some want a few dimmer wall washes or streaks of light. You also have everthing in between those extremes.
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Old 12-25-2015, 07:28 AM   #9
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To further Oso's question, what look are you trying to achieve? Uplighting looks much better as a wall wash because it also illuminates that soffit and provides a focal point that outlines the house.

Plus it is much easier for a DIY'er.
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Old 12-26-2015, 08:51 PM   #10
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Thanks for the replies!


What I'm trying to achieve is the cone effect on the wall, with the light washing the driveway. I don't need the entire wall brightly lit.

It' actually very difficult for me to install an housing, I don't have much space and it's nearly impossible to access the area from the inside due to the pitch of the roof.

What I've been thinking is replicating the approach taken by this company I've ran into (delphitech.com). What they do is use low voltage lighting that seems to just clip directly into the soffits. I'm not endorsing them, I have no knowledge of their products whatsoever.


So here's my plan, and please be gentle:

1. get an inexpensive but reliable low voltage transformer (I've used http://www.amazon.com/Paradise-GL227.../dp/B0033AGTRW) and install it in the attic. This would give me 250W. I need to check it can handle summer attic heat.

2. Run a 12/2 (or can I go with thinner wire?) low voltage wire to the side where I want the lights, and pull it to the outside. Then run it along the eave, and hide it away with a PVC wire channel painted the color of the surrounding.

3. Wherever I want to run the light, I use a hole saw to make a hole where I can clip on the light, and tap from the hole to the wire channel, which would require me to fish the wire for only a few inches. For lights, I would use something like these:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/272083740419...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

P.S. I'm in Houston. We get a few icicles once a decade, and no snow to speak of. I'll have to figure out later how to add a remote photosensor, it would be on timer initially.

P.P.S I cannot use uplights because the initial area is a concrete driveway. I am considering uplights for areas where I have a flower bed, but I wouldn't just plop them into the lawn, they will not survive a season with the crew that cuts our lawn. Also for me to use uplights, I'd have to do work on installing new outdoor outlets. People charge quite a bit to install outdoor outlets through brick veneer, and I'd need more than one.

Last edited by injvstice; 12-26-2015 at 08:57 PM.
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Old 12-26-2015, 08:58 PM   #11
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Voltage drop is an issue with LV lighting. Also most transformers are for use outside only.
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Old 12-26-2015, 09:10 PM   #12
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These lights come with a driver to maintain the voltage.
What would be the issue with using an outside transformer in an attic? I Suppose I can find an indoor transformer if I need to. But I'd like to understand what issue to avoid?

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