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Old 03-05-2010, 10:27 AM   #1
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Does this require a GFCI


I'm going to install a single outlet receptacle for a small beer fridge in my garage. I plan on tapping into a 15a light circuit. Since this circuit is not ground fault protected, does the outlet I install need to be??

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Old 03-05-2010, 10:41 AM   #2
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Does this require a GFCI


Yes, it does. How much is on this circuit? And what are electrical specs on the fridge? I'd be concrened with tripping.

Does your garage get cold in the winter? Fridges don't operate that well in extremely low temps.

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Old 03-05-2010, 10:44 AM   #3
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Does this require a GFCI


DO NOT LISTEN TO ANYONE who tells you that you don't need a GFCI on this. I would put the GFCI 'upstream' of the outlet for the fridge so that it is easy to glance at it and tell if the breaker has been tripped.
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Old 03-05-2010, 10:46 AM   #4
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Does this require a GFCI


What about plugging some sort of low-voltage light or night light into this outlet as well (or any outlet downstream) and leaving it on all the time? At least you'd know the GFCI tripped if the light went out.

In my earlier post, when I said I was concerned with tripping, I meant the breaker tripping, not the GFCI.
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Old 03-05-2010, 11:26 AM   #5
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Does this require a GFCI


Quote:
Originally Posted by mopowers View Post
I'm going to install a single outlet receptacle for a small beer fridge in my garage. I plan on tapping into a 15a light circuit. Since this circuit is not ground fault protected, does the outlet I install need to be??

THANKS!
210.8 Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel.

(A) Dwelling Units. All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and
20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in
(1) through (8) shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter
protection for personnel.
(1) Bathroom
(2) Garages, and also accessory buildings that have a floor
located at or below grade level not intended as habitable
rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas,
and areas of similar use.

Exception No. 1 to (2): Receptacles that are not readily
accessible.

Exception No. 2 to (2): A single receptacle or a duplex receptacle
for two appliances located within dedicated space for
each appliance that, in normal use, is not easily moved from
one place to another and that is cord-and-plug connected in
accordance with 400.7(A)(6), (A)(7), or (A)(8).


If he can meet or exceed the exceptions in this article he requires no GFCI protection.
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Old 03-05-2010, 11:38 AM   #6
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Does this require a GFCI


Quote:
Originally Posted by J. V. View Post
Exception No. 1 to (2): Receptacles that are not readily
accessible.
Exception No. 2 to (2): A single receptacle or a duplex receptacle
for two appliances located within dedicated space for
each appliance that, in normal use, is not easily moved from
one place to another and that is cord-and-plug connected in
accordance with 400.7(A)(6), (A)(7), or (A)(8).

If he can meet or exceed the exceptions in this article he requires no GFCI protection.
NEC 2009 did away with these exceptions.

The only receptical in a basement the NEC doesn't require be GFCI protected is an outlet dedicated to powering a security/fire alarm.
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Old 03-05-2010, 11:40 AM   #7
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Does this require a GFCI


Quote:
Originally Posted by J. V. View Post
210.8 Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel.

(A) Dwelling Units. All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and
20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in
(1) through (8) shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter
protection for personnel.
(1) Bathroom
(2) Garages, and also accessory buildings that have a floor
located at or below grade level not intended as habitable
rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas,
and areas of similar use.

Exception No. 1 to (2): Receptacles that are not readily
accessible.
Exception No. 2 to (2): A single receptacle or a duplex receptacle
for two appliances located within dedicated space for
each appliance that, in normal use, is not easily moved from
one place to another and that is cord-and-plug connected in
accordance with 400.7(A)(6), (A)(7), or (A)(8).

If he can meet or exceed the exceptions in this article he requires no GFCI protection.
They actually did away with that exception under NEC 2008
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Old 03-05-2010, 11:59 AM   #8
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Does this require a GFCI


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
They actually did away with that exception under NEC 2008
Opps... getting my dates wrong...

my local municipality adopted NEC 2008 in 2009. Thanks for setting me strait.
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Old 03-05-2010, 01:52 PM   #9
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Does this require a GFCI


Thanks for the input guys. The fridge I have is tiny. I'll look on the back to see if I can find how many amps it draws. I used it for years on a 15amp circuit before, but I'll check just to make sure.

Also, when my house was built last July, they installed a single outlet 20 amp 'non-gfci' recepticle in my other garage. They did this because I told them I wanted a dedicated 20amp circuit for the garage that I could tap into and put more outlets in. Apperently it wasn't a problem last year. They must've followed the old NEC. Now that I think of it, the outlets for the garage doors aren't gfci protected either. And again the house was built in 2009... interesting...

So now, I think I first need to find out what lights and outlets are supplied by the 15amp circuit I intend to tap into for the mini fridge. Then, total the amperage draw on the circuit to make sure the fridge won't cause the breaker to trip. Is this a logical approach???

If the circuit will handle the extra load, I will install a gfci outlet for it.


secutanudu- the garage is insulated and small, so it doesn't get that cold at all. Plus, I'm in central CA, so it doesn't get too cold outside very often. I've had the fridge plugged into another outlet all winter and it's been keeping the beer perfectly frosty

Here is a pic of the firdge in question. The cricuit I want to tap into is the switch hidden behind the water on the workbench.

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Old 03-05-2010, 02:27 PM   #10
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Does this require a GFCI


Quote:
Originally Posted by mopowers View Post
The fridge I have is tiny. I'll look on the back to see if I can find how many amps it draws.
Try looking inside first. My full size fridge has a manufacturer's plate listing the voltage and amperage of the fridge.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mopowers View Post
Also, when my house was built last July, they installed a single outlet 20 amp 'non-gfci' recepticle in my other garage. They did this because I told them I wanted a dedicated 20amp circuit for the garage that I could tap into and put more outlets in. Apperently it wasn't a problem last year. They must've followed the old NEC. Now that I think of it, the outlets for the garage doors aren't gfci protected either.
The NEC requirement for unfinished basements (and garages I think) has required GFCI for a long time. My 12+yo house has them in the basement. So unless the rules are different for a "garage" compared to an unfinished basement (which is my garage), then the 20 amp circuit might not have been installed legally.

If your garage door recepticals are mounted to the ceiling, that would qualify for Exemption #1 that J.V. listed. So prior to NEC 2008, they didn't need the GFCI protection.


One other thing to keep in mind, the NEC 2008 now requires ALL new recepticals to be labelled tamper resistant. For standard outlets, the price difference is neglagible (I guess because they are so mass produced). But when you start talking about GFCI recepticals, the TR listing can cost a few dollars more.
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Old 03-05-2010, 02:55 PM   #11
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Does this require a GFCI


Not sure CA has adopted NEC 2008 yet :

http://www.childoutletsafety.org/fil...doptionMap.pdf


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Old 03-05-2010, 03:26 PM   #12
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Does this require a GFCI


Thanks for the visual Scuba Dave! So it looks like CA hasn't yet adopted the 2008 NEC. That why my house was built last year w/ a non-gfci outlet in the garage.
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Old 03-05-2010, 05:54 PM   #13
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Does this require a GFCI


Quote:
Originally Posted by mopowers View Post
Thanks for the visual Scuba Dave! So it looks like CA hasn't yet adopted the 2008 NEC. That why my house was built last year w/ a non-gfci outlet in the garage.
But what I was trying to say is that I believe that the 2005 NEC and earlier required GFCI in the garage. My house was built over 10 years ago and the basement/garage outlet is GFCI. I doubt my builder would have installed it if it wasn't required.

So it sounds like to me that because you are under 2005 NEC, you do not need a GFCI outlet for your fridge.

But I also think your outlet in the garage was installed illegally (i.e. not according to code enforce at the time). You mentioned that you asked the builder to add this, so I could see the possibility that that circuit was never included in the building plans and therefore never reviewed by an inspector to red flag (but now I'm just speculating).
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Old 03-05-2010, 06:01 PM   #14
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Does this require a GFCI


The outlet may have been allowed as a dedicated circuit for a 2nd fridge and freezer

From what JV posted (2005)

Quote:
Exception No. 2 to (2): A single receptacle or a duplex receptacle
for two appliances located within dedicated space for
each appliance that, in normal use, is not easily moved from
one place to another and that is cord-and-plug connected in
accordance with 400.7(A)(6), (A)(7), or (A)(8).
The fact that it was not used for its intended purpose does not change the fact it met code when installed
Is it a "single outlet" - only can plug 1 device into it ?

Or a duplex outlet - can plug 2 devices
--which would still meet code if a fridge & freezer were plugged in
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Old 03-05-2010, 06:08 PM   #15
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Does this require a GFCI


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
The outlet may have been allowed as a dedicated circuit for a 2nd fridge and freezer
So you're saying if the plans for the garage simply stated "we're going to put a referigerator here", but then you never follow through, an non-GFCI outlet would be legal?

If so, I can now understand why 2008 dropped the exceptions.

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