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Old 06-13-2012, 06:29 PM   #16
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DIY stove tie-in for movie lights


One light unit requires 110 to 130 Volts AC 50/60 Hertz; the other unit requires 220 to 240 Volts AC. Both on an earth grounded circuit.

It's funny because in the models I've seen on some movie sets, there's no breaker -- the wiring seems pretty direct, all in a single receptacle.

I've tried to find an example, attached is a picture that looks the closest (although this one seems old).

How do they do this? What are the trade-offs they have to deal with?

Thanks.
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Old 06-13-2012, 06:31 PM   #17
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DIY stove tie-in for movie lights


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Originally Posted by FCharles View Post
One light unit requires 110 to 130 Volts AC 50/60 Hertz; the other unit requires 220 to 240 Volts AC. Both on an earth grounded circuit.

It's funny because in the models I've seen on some movie sets, there's no breaker -- the wiring seems pretty direct, all in a single receptacle.

I've tried to find an example, attached is a picture that looks the closest (although this one seems old).

How do they do this? What are the trade-offs they have to deal with?

Thanks.
That has got to be the most hacked picture I have ever seen!

Besides the HACK picture, what amperage are the loads you are trying to supply power to?
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Old 06-13-2012, 06:57 PM   #18
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DIY stove tie-in for movie lights


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That has got to be the most hacked picture I have ever seen!

Besides the HACK picture, what amperage are the loads you are trying to supply power to?
It is pretty FUBAR, Darwin would love it.
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Old 06-13-2012, 07:02 PM   #19
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DIY stove tie-in for movie lights


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Originally Posted by FCharles View Post
One light unit requires 110 to 130 Volts AC 50/60 Hertz; the other unit requires 220 to 240 Volts AC. Both on an earth grounded circuit.

It's funny because in the models I've seen on some movie sets, there's no breaker -- the wiring seems pretty direct, all in a single receptacle.

I've tried to find an example, attached is a picture that looks the closest (although this one seems old).

How do they do this? What are the trade-offs they have to deal with?

Thanks.
Sorry dude, there are a variety of solutions to your question, but you have yet to demonstrate that you are qualified, please seek out a licensed electrician. Harsh, I know, but that is my opinion.
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Old 06-13-2012, 07:04 PM   #20
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DIY stove tie-in for movie lights


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Sounds like someone is trying to wire up some grow lights to me.
At this point, I may be inclined to agree.
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Old 06-13-2012, 07:34 PM   #21
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DIY stove tie-in for movie lights


Who was saying that a cord and (male) plug may not be hard wired into a portable subpanel but rather the subpanel requires a male receptacle that accepts an extension cord (perhaps with single female receptacle at one end)?

About the square portable outlet box pictured above with two duplex receptacles fed by a hard wired cord with plug, either it was homemade and not code compliant, or it has a 15 or 20 amp 120 volt plug at the other end. This box is no different from a common "power strip".
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Old 06-13-2012, 07:56 PM   #22
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DIY stove tie-in for movie lights


Have to love the bootlegged ground.
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Old 06-13-2012, 08:09 PM   #23
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DIY stove tie-in for movie lights


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Have to love the bootlegged ground.
I think in this picture it's a bootlegged neutral.
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Old 06-14-2012, 12:19 AM   #24
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DIY stove tie-in for movie lights


One reason that this sort of contraption is used on movie sets is because production companies have licensed electricians on hand to manufacture and maintain them. Another is that everyone who is allowed near them has signed the necessary legal paperwork to protect the studio if one of them blows up on a shoot and kills someone.
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Old 06-14-2012, 06:41 AM   #25
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DIY stove tie-in for movie lights


I will give whoever made up those GFI's in the pic a little credit. This is the first time I've seen the devices match the phase colors.
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Old 06-14-2012, 06:33 PM   #26
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DIY stove tie-in for movie lights


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Hi -

I'm building a "stove tie-in" like the ones used on some movie sets.

It's a stove plug that wires into a double 110 receptacle/outlet (4 sockets).

The idea is to get more watts for lights easily when shooting in a house, by unplugging the stove and plugging this temporarily instead.

Models I've seen don't have a breaker as I presume overload risks are carefully monitored by film crew and the odd blown out light bulb isn't a big issue.

- 4 wires jut out of the stove plug: black, red, white and copper-color.
- These go into a double outlet receptacle
- The 2 outlets nested in it each have screws/plates on each side (silver and golden) and a green screw/plate .
- The receptacle has 1 green screw/plate

My questions:
1) Where to tie/screw in place the black, red, white and copper-color wires?
2) Do I have to wire nut/connect these to smaller caliber wires inside the receptacle before tying/screwing them in place on the outlets?

Thanks

Charles
I understand what you want to do !

But to be safe the stove outlets do need to be 4 wire only.

You need two hots (usually the black and red)
You need a neutral (usually the white)
You need a ground (green or bare wire)

You will need 4 x 20a outlets,
You will also need 4 x 20a breakers (important)
As you cannot run 20a outlets off a 30 or 40a line
without some protection.

The black wire goes to two breakers and then to 2 x outlets.
The red wire goes to the other two breakers then to 2 x outlets.
Neutral and earth goes to all four outlets.

For extra safety consider using GFCI's.

This will work and safely.
But is it up to code ?
Depends on your locality.
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Old 06-14-2012, 06:38 PM   #27
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DIY stove tie-in for movie lights


Quote:
Originally Posted by FCharles View Post
One light unit requires 110 to 130 Volts AC 50/60 Hertz; the other unit requires 220 to 240 Volts AC. Both on an earth grounded circuit.

It's funny because in the models I've seen on some movie sets, there's no breaker -- the wiring seems pretty direct, all in a single receptacle.

I've tried to find an example, attached is a picture that looks the closest (although this one seems old).

How do they do this? What are the trade-offs they have to deal with?

Thanks.
DO NOT USE THINGS LIKE THIS !!!!
Uses the earth for neatral !
No overload protection !

see picture in post 16.
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Old 06-14-2012, 07:02 PM   #28
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DIY stove tie-in for movie lights


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Originally Posted by k_buz View Post
I will give whoever made up those GFI's in the pic a little credit. This is the first time I've seen the devices match the phase colors.
I managed the rewiring of a physics research lab when I was an undergrad, and we specified red/green/blue receptacles for the three phases. It was really handy.
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Old 06-14-2012, 08:02 PM   #29
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DIY stove tie-in for movie lights


There are no electrical code issues with what the OP proposed. The electric code and building official authority ends with the outlet.

UL, who cares, he is not selling anything.

Liability, OK, you better make it safe. He should be able to run 240V lights from this, no problem. As others have stated, the 120 loads is a bit dicy since there is no neutral.
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Old 06-15-2012, 12:06 AM   #30
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DIY stove tie-in for movie lights


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There are no electrical code issues with what the OP proposed. The electric code and building official authority ends with the outlet.

UL, who cares, he is not selling anything.

Liability, OK, you better make it safe. He should be able to run 240V lights from this, no problem. As others have stated, the 120 loads is a bit dicy since there is no neutral.
I tend to agree with this. Anything connected with a plug and not permanently installed is not bound by the NEC. However, the proposed device is definitely not safe.

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