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-   -   DIY electrical work questions for finishing a basement. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/diy-electrical-work-questions-finishing-basement-13458/)

mac41099 11-15-2007 03:17 PM

DIY electrical work questions for finishing a basement.
 
This is my first post and I'm brand new to the forum. I'm in the process of finishing a basement and need some help on electrical questions. Please bear with me on some of these as I am new to electrical work, too.

1. Do you figure up the watts for each light bulb in a light to figure out how many lights/watts to run on a 15 AMP breaker using the 1440 watts rule?

2. I can't find it on the light, but does anyone have any idea how many watts a flourescent light with the two long 3ft bulbs uses?

3. I have a 15 AMP breaker and want to put the following on it: 10 outlets, 1 GFCI, 1 outlet with a freezer on it, and 1 outlet with a wine fridge on it. Too much, right?

4. I have a 20 AMP feeding 5 outlets. One of those is a GFCI, 1 will have a small fridge (for under a bar), 1 will have a microwave on it, and the other 2 will probably never have anything plugged into them. Is this ok? And do I run the 12/2 from breaker to GFCI first and then to the fridge & microwave ones next with the 2 other outlets at the end of the run?

5. Any idea how many watts a power room light/fan has in watts/AMPs to figure out what all I can run on that line?

Thank you very much for your help.

KUIPORNG 11-15-2007 03:24 PM

see my answers, been there before
 
1. Do you figure up the watts for each light bulb in a light to figure out how many lights/watts to run on a 15 AMP breaker using the 1440 watts rule? Not the light bulb, but the maximum allowablle watts for the lighting device.

2. I can't find it on the light, but does anyone have any idea how many watts a flourescent light with the two long 3ft bulbs uses? don't know but probably wont' be too much, may be 60 watt (guessing only)

3. I have a 15 AMP breaker and want to put the following on it: 10 outlets, 1 GFCI, 1 outlet with a freezer on it, and 1 outlet with a wine fridge on it. Too much, right? Probably not, you can put as many as outlets as you want, but suggestions is kind of 12 or less, but there isn't really a limit in most codes... again, you need to find the spec for your freezer to find its watts then add the wine fridge's watt to find how much watts you have left and is it make sense to have outlets at all...

4. I have a 20 AMP feeding 5 outlets. One of those is a GFCI, 1 will have a small fridge (for under a bar), 1 will have a microwave on it, and the other 2 will probably never have anything plugged into them. Is this ok? And do I run the 12/2 from breaker to GFCI first and then to the fridge & microwave ones next with the 2 other outlets at the end of the run?
Microwave may requires a dedicated breaker, but I am not sure, but not a good idea to run GFCI then device like microwave..... I don't think so.... if Microwave no need to have its own breaker then you are fine...

5. Any idea how many watts a power room light/fan has in watts/AMPs to figure out what all I can run on that line? light /fan all depends on what device you are buying, but they are not that high normally.

Thank you very much for your help.

mac41099 11-15-2007 03:32 PM

Thanks for the answers.

Also, is it best to run lights on a 15 AMP breaker with 14/2 or could I put them on a 20 AMP with 12/2 wire to get more on a line?

KUIPORNG 11-15-2007 03:54 PM

either way would work. Use 20 AMP give you more capacity but you need to buy more expensive wires.... people normally want to spend only what they need to... consider you need a substancial amount of wires to wire the whole basement.... I myself use 14/2 in my basement....

Piedmont 11-16-2007 10:50 AM

Well, the technicalities are that a 15 amp circuit can wire up to 600 sq ft, a 20 amp up to 800 sq ft. It's usually 10 average light fixtures & 10 receptacles on a single 15A circuit (unless it adds up to excessive wattage). Keep in mind, some inspectors follow the 10 light fixtures per circuit strictly and may not care if the ones on there are flourescent and have a problem with you going over the 10. I don't know how many a 20A circuit and how many they can supply, but that would hint a 20A circuit can supply 12.5 lights & 12.5 receptacles check with your inspector. Let the jokes begin about the 12.5 :)

Microwaves in kitchens require their own 20A dedicated circuit, don't think that applies here doesn't sound like you've got a kitchen. Microwaves do draw a lot of power (most home medium sized ones are 900-1200 watts) and if sharing the power with other stuff probably best the circuit the microwave is on be 20A circuit with 12 awg wire. All receptacles in an unfinished basement must be GFCI protected, every basement needs at least a GFCI protected receptacle. Any outlet within 6' of a sink/water also needs GFCI protection. I think it best to protect all your basement outlets with GFCI, need so many anyway might as well just make sure they're all piggy-backed to a GFCI outlet. Any normal outlets chained into the load side of a GFCI need to have a sticker on them that says GFCI protected.

Every door/entryway needs a receptacle within 6'. From there at no point along the wall can a receptacle be more than 12' away from another receptacle. Has to do with lamp cords being 6' long the above will let you plug that lamp in anywhere without using an extension cord. Any wall that's 2' or wider needs a receptacle (even if that forces you to put one within the 12' above). Hallways over 10' long need a receptacle, otherwise they're exempt. Any dividers such as railings, or freestanding counters are considered a wall and follow the above rules (hence may need receptacles). You can install floor receptacles designed for such within 18" of the wall instead of putting them in the wall to meet above requirements. No receptacle can be installed over an electrical baseboard heater.

Hallways need to be switched at both ends (3 way). Every entrance to a house needs an outside light attached to a switch inside so if this basement has it's own entrance it needs a entry light & switch. Every storage room in an attic/basement needs a switched light receptacle, the switch must be at the entrance to these areas.

Anyway, that's the ones I can come up with that may apply.

mac41099 11-16-2007 11:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Piedmont (Post 74266)
Well, the technicalities are that a 15 amp circuit can wire up to 600 sq ft, a 20 amp up to 800 sq ft. It's usually 10 average light fixtures & 10 receptacles on a single 15A circuit (unless it adds up to excessive wattage). Keep in mind, some inspectors follow the 10 light fixtures per circuit strictly and may not care if the ones on there are flourescent and have a problem with you going over the 10. I don't know how many a 20A circuit and how many they can supply, but that would hint a 20A circuit can supply 12.5 lights & 12.5 receptacles check with your inspector. Let the jokes begin about the 12.5 :)

Microwaves in kitchens require their own 20A dedicated circuit, don't think that applies here doesn't sound like you've got a kitchen. Microwaves do draw a lot of power (most home medium sized ones are 900-1200 watts) and if sharing the power with other stuff probably best the circuit the microwave is on be 20A circuit with 12 awg wire. All receptacles in an unfinished basement must be GFCI protected, every basement needs at least a GFCI protected receptacle. Any outlet within 6' of a sink/water also needs GFCI protection. I think it best to protect all your basement outlets with GFCI, need so many anyway might as well just make sure they're all piggy-backed to a GFCI outlet. Any normal outlets chained into the load side of a GFCI need to have a sticker on them that says GFCI protected.

Every door/entryway needs a receptacle within 6'. From there at no point along a wall can a receptacle be more than 12' away on a wall from another. Has to do with lamp cords being 6' long the above will let you plug that lamp in anywhere without using an extension cord. Any wall that's 2' or wider needs a receptacle (even if that forces you to put one within the 12' above). Hallways over 10' long need a receptacle, otherwise they're exempt from the 6' rule. Any dividers such as railings, or freestanding counters are considered a wall and follow the above rules. You can install floor receptacles designed for such within 18" of the wall instead of putting them in the wall to meet above requirements. No receptacle can be installed over an electrical baseboard heater.

Hallways need to be switched at both ends (3 way). Every entrance to a house needs an outside light attached to a switch inside so if this basement has it's own entrance it needs a entry light & switch. Every storage room in an attic/basement needs a switched light receptacle, the switch must be at the entrance to these areas.

Anyway, that's the ones I can come up with that may apply.

Thanks for the reply. I have reconfigured my layout as follows:

EXISTING BREAKERS:


20 AMP
13 outlets (and majority will probably never get any use)

20 AMP
1 GFCI
1 outlet for small fridge under bar
1 outlet for 800 watt microwave under bar
2 outlets

15 AMP
10 outlets (majority probably won't get used)
1 GFCI
1 outlet for a freezer

15 AMP
2 lights (150 watts total)
2 lights (200 watts total)
1 flourescent light (60-75 watts total?)
9 6" canned lights at 75 watts each (675 watts total)
3 4" canned lights at 60 watts each (180 watts total)
TOTAL watts 1,265-1,280 range

NEW BREAKERS:


15 AMP
9 6" canned lights at 75 watts each (675 watts total)
1 pool table light (125-150 watts?)
2 sconce lights (125-150 total watts?)
TOTAL watts 1,075-1,125 range

15 AMP
6 6" canned lights at 75 watts each (450 watts total)
4 sconce lights at 75-100 watts each (300-400 watts total)
1 light at 75 watts
2 flourescent lights at 60-75 watts each (120-150 total watts)
1 outlet for a wine fridge
TOTAL watts 1,100-1,300 range

Piedmont 11-16-2007 04:27 PM

As a tip, I noticed some of your receptacles will be on 20A circuits. As an FYI you can use 15A receptacles in 20A circuits. That will let you buy a bulk 15A receptacle box (or two) and use it for all the receptacles. The 15A are the same thing internally, they just have a 15A face instead of a 20A face and, allowed by code you can put 15A recepts & light switches in a 20A circuit but, you CAN NOT go the other way and mix 20A receptacles in a 15A circuit. The wiring though, must be 12 awg for the 20A circuits even if you have 15A light switches & recepts.

Andy in ATL 11-16-2007 08:59 PM

Well said, Piedmont.:yes:


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