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Old 06-07-2011, 05:24 PM   #1
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DIY Electrical work in New Jersey


I am going to try and shed some much needed light on doing your own electrical work in The Great Police State of New Jersey. I will continue to add to this thread as time permits. Please do not PM me as I would rather respond to your questions and comments in this thread so that others may benefit as well.

Currently New Jersey is using the 2008 NEC for all new construction.
For any work falling under the Rehab Subcode - 2005 NEC.
The 2011 NEC has not been adopted yet.

The NEC as written is not the the electrical code for NJ. The Electrical Subcode can be found in the Uniform Construction Code of New Jersey (UCC). Currently the UCC has adopted the 2008 NEC with modifications which can be found here on page 67. While none of the modifications are severe changes from what is in the book, it still needs to be stated.

One of the modifications reads as follows;

3. Chapter 2 of the electrical subcode, entitled "Wiring and Protection," is amended as follows:
i. Section 210.8 (A)(2) and (5) of Article 210, entitled Branch Circuits, is deleted; it is replaced by Section 210.8(A)(2) and (5) and the exceptions in the National Electrical Code 2005 as follows:
"210.8(A)(2) - Garages, and also accessory buildings that have a floor located at or below grade level not intended as habitable rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas, and areas of similar use.
Exception No. 1 to (2) - Receptacles that are not readily accessible.
Exception No. 2 to (2) - A single receptacle or a duplex receptacle for two appliances located within dedicated space for each appliance that, in normal use, is not easily moved from one place to another and that is cord-and-plug connected in accordance with 400.7(A)(6), (A)7, or (A)(8).
Receptacles installed under the exceptions to 210.8(A)(2) shall not be considered as meeting the requirements of 210.52(G).
210.8(A)(5) - Unfinished basements: For purposes of this section, unfinished basements are defined as portions or areas of the basement not intended as habitable rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas, and the like.
Exception No. 1 to (5) - Receptacles that are not readily accessible.
Exception No. 2 to (5) - A single receptacle or a duplex receptacle for two appliances located within dedicated space for each appliance that, in normal use, is not easily moved from one place to another and that is cord-and-plug connected in accordance with 400.7(A)(6), (A)7, or (A)(8).
Exception No. 3 to (5) - A receptacle supplying only a permanently installed fire alarm or burglar alarm system shall not be required to have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection."

What this means is that we are reverting back to the 2005 NEC for these sections when wiring a new building.

When wiring an existing building the Rehab Subcode needs to be reviewed. Currently all work being performed under the Rehab Subcode must comply with the 2005 NEC. This includes the installation of AFCI devices, which in most cases are not required.

Permits and inspections are regulated under the UCC. Everything anyone needs to know about the Construction Department can be found in the UCC. The Rehab Subcode can also be found in the UCC.

THe Rehab Subcode comes into play if you are performing work on an existing structure.

To check if someone has an EC license go here.

For electrical contractor licensing requirements go here. New Jersey does not reciprocate with any other state.

Electrical contractors laws and regulations here.

List of inspectors by municipality here.

Online permit forms and application here. Note: All municipalties are required to accept these forms. If a town refuses them, call the DCA @ Phone: (609) 292-7898, (609) 292-7899, Fax: (609)-633-6729 and complain.

Assorted DCA forms here.

Home Improvement Contractors information here. List of licensed HI contractors here.

Fire Alarm, Burglar Alarm and Locksmith info here.

Home Inspectors here.

After reading this perhaps you will have a new found respect for what contractors go through everyday in order to work in this great state.


To be continued...,

I would like to know if this information has helped anyone. Please post a thanks if it does. Thanks

Last edited by electures; 06-08-2011 at 08:08 PM.
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Old 06-07-2011, 06:14 PM   #2
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(a) Ordinary maintenance to structures may be made without filing a permit application with or giving notice to the construction official.


(b) Ordinary maintenance shall not include any of the following: (see page 3)


This section covers what you can do without a permit.

Last edited by electures; 06-07-2011 at 07:45 PM.
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Old 06-07-2011, 06:32 PM   #3
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The Construction Department in your municipality is organized as follows;

Construction Official - In charge of the department. All subcodes answer to the CO.

Subcode Officials; Building, Plumbing, Electrical, Fire, Elevator.

Inspectors; For each subcode

In small towns many officials wear many hats. Example; Building Subcode Official also performs building inspections and is the Construction Official. This is how the towns keep their costs down. There are officials who hold every license and are one man inspection departments and perform all of the responsibilities.

Larger towns such as Atlantic City, Camden may have individual Subcode Officials and Inspectors. It depends on the volume of permits.

Other towns may share services with adjoining towns. This is known as an Inter-Local Agency. Again this is intended to save money.

Yet other towns may use third party agencies or turn it all over to the state.

There is also a Permit Clerk who handles the paper work.

Last edited by electures; 06-07-2011 at 06:36 PM.
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Old 06-07-2011, 06:55 PM   #4
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(a) The application for a permit shall be submitted on the standard Construction Permit Application form prescribed by the Commissioner at N.J.A.C. 5:23-4.5(b)2 and shall be accompanied by the required fee, as provided for in this subchapter and N.J.A.C. 5:23-4. The application shall contain a general description of the proposed work, its location, the use and occupancy of all parts of the building or structure and all portions of the site or lot not covered by the building or structure, and such additional information as may be required by the construction official, which shall include, but not be limited to, the following: (see pg 15)


Plumbing and electrical work shall not be undertaken except by persons licensed to perform such work pursuant to law, except in the case of a single family homeowner on his own dwelling.


Only the homeowner is allowed to work on his own dwelling without a license. Not your brother, father, sister, aunt, uncle and so on.

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Old 06-07-2011, 06:59 PM   #5
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Electrical plans and specifications shall contain: Floor and ceiling plans; lighting, receptacles, motors and equipment; service entry location, line diagram and wire, conduit and breaker sizes.

The Electrical Subcode Official can require a set of electrical plans for what you are doing. It is a good idea because a lot of problems can be caught in the beginning. So don't complain.
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Old 06-07-2011, 07:00 PM   #6
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Quote:
Plumbing and electrical work shall not be undertaken except by persons licensed to perform such work pursuant to law, except in the case of a single family homeowner on his own dwelling.


Does this mean a female cannot work on a house they own?
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Old 06-07-2011, 07:01 PM   #7
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5:23-2.16 Construction permits--procedure
(a) Action on application: The construction official or the appropriate subcode official in the case of construction involving only one trade or subcode, shall examine or cause to be examined all applications for permits and amendments thereto, and approve or deny in whole or in part the application, within 20 business days. If the application is denied in whole or in part, the enforcing agency shall set forth the reasons therefore in writing. If an enforcing agency fails to grant, in whole or in part, or deny an application within 20 business days, such failure shall be deemed a denial of the application for purposes of an appeal to the Construction Board of Appeals, unless such period of time has been extended with the consent of the applicant. Whenever plans have been rejected and are thereafter revised and resubmitted, the revised plans shall be released if the deficiencies that were stated as grounds for rejection have been corrected and code compliance has been demonstrated. In that case, a written notice of release shall be given to the applicant not later than seven business days after the resubmission of the revised plans. When the grounds for rejection have not been corrected or when code compliance has not been demonstrated, a written notice of rejection stating the grounds for rejection shall be given to the applicant not later than seven business days after the resubmission of the revised plans.

What this means is that the Construction Department has twenty business days to review and reject or approve your permit application. If rejected they shall provide in writing the reasons for rejection. Once resubmitted the department now has 7 business days to approve or reject the application.

The Construction Official and all Subcode Officials shall keep regular business hours. This is so the public can come in and meet with them. Some towns may also keep regular evening hours to make it easier for HO's to come in.

Last edited by electures; 06-08-2011 at 10:22 PM.
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Old 06-07-2011, 07:03 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
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Does this mean a female cannot work on a house they own?

Wise guy!!

I just copied and pasted.
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Old 06-07-2011, 07:32 PM   #9
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(c) Notice for inspection:
1. The owner or other responsible person in charge of work shall notify the enforcing agency when the work is ready for any required inspection specified herein or required by the construction official or appropriate subcode official. This notice shall be given at least 24 hours prior to the time the inspection is desired. This notice shall represent an attestation on the part of the owner, other than single-family owner-occupants performing their own work, or other responsible person in charge of work, that the work has been completed in conformance with the code and is ready for inspection.
2. Inspections shall be performed within three business days of the time for which it was requested. The work shall not proceed in a manner which will preclude the inspection until it has been made.
(d) Final inspection: Upon completion of the building or structure, and before the issuance of a certificate of use and occupancy required herein, a final inspection shall be made, and any violations of the code shall be noted and the holder of the permit shall be notified of any discrepancies by the construction official. The final inspection shall include:


Do not call unless you are ready for inspection. The code enforcement office has twentyfour hours to schedule the inspection. The inspector has three business days from the requested date to complete the inspection. If the inspector doesn't make it within the three days, the work shall not continue in any way that would preclude the inspector from performing the inspection. Your only recourse for the inspector not showing up on time is to complain to the DCA. The work shall be inspected.

Inspections shall be completed during regular daytime business hours. Some inspectors may also work during the evening to make it easier for HO's.

Last edited by electures; 06-08-2011 at 08:02 PM.
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Old 06-08-2011, 05:31 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by electures View Post

Plumbing and electrical work shall not be undertaken except by persons licensed to perform such work pursuant to law, except in the case of a single family homeowner on his own dwelling.



Only the homeowner is allowed to work on his own dwelling without a license. Not your brother, father, sister, aunt, uncle and so on.

Many towns has this requirement posted, which also states that it is a criminal act to falsify any information on the permit application.
This does not stop unliciensed individuals, from doing jobs. They just do not get permits.
The EC's have a hard time competing with the cutrate prices and in the end it is the consumer that suffers.
A few years ago I had to redo an above ground pool, because when it was installed no permits were pulled and now it had to be done by the current code. Who paid the price, the consumer, who had to pay twice.
Bottom line
Get a permit, do the work yourself or hire a licensed EC
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Old 06-08-2011, 08:35 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by NJMarine View Post
Many towns has this requirement posted, which also states that it is a criminal act to falsify any information on the permit application.
This does not stop unliciensed individuals, from doing jobs. They just do not get permits.
The EC's have a hard time competing with the cutrate prices and in the end it is the consumer that suffers.
A few years ago I had to redo an above ground pool, because when it was installed no permits were pulled and now it had to be done by the current code. Who paid the price, the consumer, who had to pay twice.
Bottom line
Get a permit, do the work yourself or hire a licensed EC
The construction permit application found here (pg 2) contains the "Certification in Lieu of Oath". By signing this (and you will) the HO certifies that all information is correct. If any of the information you stated or provided is not true, you have "provided false and misleading information" on a permit application. You will be fined.

Now, please understand that there are only two people in the Great Police State of New Jersey who can impose a fine and collect it. The first being a judge, and the second being a Construction Official. Do not make the mistake of messing with these people.
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Old 06-08-2011, 04:19 PM   #12
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The National Electrical Code

Also known as NFPA 70. Published every three years. Not always adopted by NJ in a timely manner. Also not the only code used for electrical work in New Jersey. Other codes used are the UL White book, IRC, NFPA 70E, NFPA 72, NFPA 20. The UCC also mandates that where ever the NEC references another publication, that publication shall also be considered code.

Any contractor working in the state deals with all these codes and more everyday. When you hire an EC not only are you getting his work, you are getting his knowledge.

Last edited by electures; 06-08-2011 at 10:16 PM.
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Old 06-13-2011, 08:26 AM   #13
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Have all the boxes installed and all the splices made up. This includes equipment grounds, neutrals, and switching splices. Do not install any devices. The inspector needs to see inside the boxes. Have all the cabling properly secured. If you are having the service inspected, have the panel cut in, ground rod(s) driven, main bonding jumper installed, grounding electrode conductor installed and terminated, meter enclosure installed and cut in, service cable head installed (verticle, not on an angle), point of attachment at or below the service head and use de-ox on all aluminum terminations. The POCO will probabely also want a GFI receptacle at the service if it is a new house house. Also be aware that none of the electrical wiring or equipment can be installed unless the roof and all windows are installed (new house or addtition). This will prevent the wiring from getting wet.
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Old 04-12-2012, 06:10 PM   #14
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Effective October of last year, New Jersey has updated its ReHab Subcode. One significant fact is that GFI requirements are as follows;

3. Chapter 2 of the electrical subcode, entitled "Wiring and Protection," is amended as follows:
i. Section 210.8 (A)(2) and (5) of Article 210, entitled Branch Circuits, is deleted; it is replaced by Section 210.8(A)(2) and (5) and the exceptions in the National Electrical Code 2005 as follows:
"210.8(A)(2) - Garages, and also accessory buildings that have a floor located at or below grade level not intended as habitable rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas, and areas of similar use.
Exception No. 1 to (2) - Receptacles that are not readily accessible.
Exception No. 2 to (2) - A single receptacle or a duplex receptacle for two appliances located within dedicated space for each appliance that, in normal use, is not easily moved from one place to another and that is cord-and-plug connected in accordance with 400.7(A)(6), (A)7, or (A)(8).
Receptacles installed under the exceptions to 210.8(A)(2) shall not be considered as meeting the requirements of 210.52(G).
210.8(A)(5) - Unfinished basements: For purposes of this section, unfinished basements are defined as portions or areas of the basement not intended as habitable rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas, and the like.
Exception No. 1 to (5) - Receptacles that are not readily accessible.
Exception No. 2 to (5) - A single receptacle or a duplex receptacle for two appliances located within dedicated space for each appliance that, in normal use, is not easily moved from one place to another and that is cord-and-plug connected in accordance with 400.7(A)(6), (A)7, or (A)(8).
Exception No. 3 to (5) - A receptacle supplying only a permanently installed fire alarm or burglar alarm system shall not be required to have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection."

What this means is that we are reverting back to the 2005 NEC for these sections when wiring a new building.

I'll post other facts when time allows..
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Old 04-12-2012, 09:02 PM   #15
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Notices of code changes and updates help everyone.
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