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-   -   Dishwasher install (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/dishwasher-install-159082/)

abjkkc 10-05-2012 05:27 PM

Dishwasher install
 
We're replacing our cabinets, and getting a new dishwasher. Cabinets aren't here yet, but I'm starting to plan for appliance installation. The Bosch dishwasher we bought (http://www.bosch-home.com/us/SHX55RL5UC.html?a=b) has instructions for hard-wiring, although it says it can also be modified for plug-in connection.
The instructions just show the romex left bare (no conduit) running from the back of the wall under the dishwasher to the front connections. Is this really okay?!? Would it be better to purchase the power cord for it, and set it up that way?
My concern about this is knowing where to place the outlet so that it won't interfere with the dishwasher when I push it back into place.

Any thoughts?

Thanks!

Trane 10-05-2012 06:05 PM

You are fine just running a piece of romex out of the wall near the bottom. Leave a good 4' coiled up for now and cut it to length after the dishwasher is set and you are ready to tie it in.

rjniles 10-05-2012 07:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Trane (Post 1024585)
You are fine just running a piece of romex out of the wall near the bottom. Leave a good 4' coiled up for now and cut it to length after the dishwasher is set and you are ready to tie it in.

Not true in many locations. Often you need to provide a disconnect. This can be a wall mounted switch or a plug and receptacle. Personally I like to put the receptacle in the adjacent sink base cabinet and install a cord/plug on the DW.

Trane 10-05-2012 07:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjniles (Post 1024657)
Not true in many locations. Often you need to provide a disconnect. This can be a wall mounted switch or a plug and receptacle. Personally I like to put the receptacle in the adjacent sink base cabinet and install a cord/plug on the DW.

It's true as far as the NEC. If a certain location has a different amendment, then that is a different story. Kinda like the way you can't use romex in Chicago.

allthumbsdiy 10-05-2012 08:05 PM

Although plenty of people do it with direction connection as stated in the manual, Bosch makes it very easy to hookup to a power cord.

So when I installed my Bosch (SHX45P06UC) dishwasher, I used an universal power cord kit to make my dishwasher a plugin unit which made it easier to remove for maintenance/troubleshooting/upgrades.

The 3 prong power cord has thicker sheathing and more flexible. In addition, 6' cord length gave me plenty of space maneuver the unit for maintenance/troubleshooting/upgrades.

One thing to keep in mind is that I haven't seen these cords with flat plug heads so I installed a recessed receptacle box. I could have installed a receptacle box under my sink but with water filters, multiple shutoffs, etc., I just did not want to chance it being exposed to water leaks.

You may want contact your inspector to see what method is acceptable for your town.

Good luck

sublime2 10-05-2012 08:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjniles

Not true in many locations. Often you need to provide a disconnect. This can be a wall mounted switch or a plug and receptacle. Personally I like to put the receptacle in the adjacent sink base cabinet and install a cord/plug on the DW.

If it's a dedicated line from the Panel wouldn't the breaker serve as the disconnect?

allthumbsdiy 10-05-2012 09:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Trane (Post 1024678)
It's true as far as the NEC. If a certain location has a different amendment, then that is a different story. Kinda like the way you can't use romex in Chicago.

so what do they use in Chicago, BX? Do you know if there is a particular logic behind that decision (i.e. pests, etc.)

rjniles 10-05-2012 09:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sublime2 (Post 1024710)
If it's a dedicated line from the Panel wouldn't the breaker serve as the disconnect?

A disconnect has to be in sight of the appliance. Seldom is the panel close enough to the kitchen to meet that requiement.

Dierte 10-05-2012 09:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjniles

A disconnect has to be in sight of the appliance. Seldom is the panel close enough to the kitchen to meet that requiement.

But a breaker lock takes care of this

rjniles 10-06-2012 07:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dierte (Post 1024735)
But a breaker lock takes care of this

Only if you can see it from the dish washer.

k_buz 10-06-2012 07:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rjniles (Post 1024912)
Only if you can see it from the dish washer.

Not true, a breaker lock is acceptable if out of sight. That is the point. You can't see the breaker, so you lock it to keep it turned off instead of visually monitoring it.

rjniles 10-06-2012 07:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dierte (Post 1024735)
But a breaker lock takes care of this

I misread your post, I thought it said breaker box (instead of lock). Certainly a breaker lock accomplishes the requirement.

md2lgyk 10-06-2012 08:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by allthumbsdiy (Post 1024718)
so what do they use in Chicago, BX? Do you know if there is a particular logic behind that decision (i.e. pests, etc.)

I believe it is because of vermin chewing on the wires. Not in Chicago, but I once owned a house where all the wiring was in metal conduit.

k_buz 10-06-2012 08:35 AM

The more common theory is that this is a union code. If you are forced to use conduit, that rules out 95% of homeowners and unqualified handymen doing electrical work.

Jim Port 10-06-2012 01:14 PM

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