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Old 11-07-2012, 02:27 PM   #1
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Direct wiring


I have figured out how to wire my cooktop to the wall by splicing its wires into an old 3-pronged laptop power cord that I cut. Now that I know what the correct wiring is, I'm wondering what the correct/safe way to finish the job is.

If this were an electronics job I'd use solder and heatshrink but I'm not sure what to do here. (Also it's kind of hard to reach so something easier would be nice.)

- Is the laptop cord good enough? It has three conductors (obviously), although I notice some whitish hair-like stuff inside each one along with the copper. What is that? Is it ok? Do I have to worry about gauge?
- How to make the connections properly? Using those plastic twisty things like with romex?
- How about the unused wires (there are 4). One twisty thing per wire? Can I cram them all into one twisty thing?
- What are the twisty things called?
- Once I have all the connections made, do I need to put something over the whole works? Or is it fine to leave the individual conductors exposed.

Thanks!

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Old 11-07-2012, 02:29 PM   #2
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Call an electrician!

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Old 11-07-2012, 02:30 PM   #3
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Where's the fun in that!?
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Old 11-07-2012, 02:31 PM   #4
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Also, isn't this a DIY site???
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Old 11-07-2012, 02:31 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomsmyth View Post
Where's the fun in that!?
Keeps the house from burning down for one!
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Old 11-07-2012, 02:32 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomsmyth View Post
Also, isn't this a DIY site???
Yes it is, but you have no clue and there is not enough bandwidth to explain it to you.
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Old 11-07-2012, 02:36 PM   #7
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I've asked a series of pretty simple questions. If you don't feel like answering them, that's ok. If anyone else would like to, I'd appreciate it.
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Old 11-07-2012, 02:42 PM   #8
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Tom,

What you want to do is dangerous. A laptop power cord is not rated for nor heavy enough to use with your cooktop.
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Old 11-07-2012, 02:46 PM   #9
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Ok, thanks. I will need to get a heavier cord then. How about the kind used to connect a desktop computer power supply? Desktop computers can draw a lot of current! (I have a lot of extra computer cords around).

In general, what rules of thumb should I be following here? How can I measure or check if a given cord is high enough gauge?
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Old 11-07-2012, 02:58 PM   #10
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Think bigger.

How many watts does your cooktop require? It must say somewhere. We're talking 1000's of watts, your desktop, a couple of hundred max. You also need to follow the manufacturers installation instructions. You can not use flexible cord (like an extension cord) as permanent fixed wiring.
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Old 11-07-2012, 03:12 PM   #11
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Before anyone can give you an answer besides call an electrician, you are going to need to supply much more information. Is this a gas or electric cooktop? What are the power requirements according to the instructions or dataplate? Are you pulling a new circuit or using an existing one? what is the rating of the old one? How many wires?

Just because you have cords laying around does not mean that you can use them for this purpose or that it will be safe.

From your questions it does not appear that you currently have the knowledge to even attempt this project. Sorry.
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Old 11-07-2012, 03:54 PM   #12
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Ah, it appears I left out some key details. My bad.

This is a gas cooktop and the only reason I'm wiring it up is to get the sparking system to work. Previously we had been using a barbecue lighter. I saw that whoever installed the cooktop had not connected the electrical. There were 7 dangling wires with stripped ends, that is all.

I have determined through my experimentation which hot wire I need to connect (along with the neutrals and ground) to make the sparkers work. The cooktop also has range hood controls, and I assume that's what the other wires are for, but I don't need them so I'm not going to connect them.

I looked at the plate. It says it draws 5.0 amps at 120 volts which by my calculation is 600W. I would assume the sparker does not draw this much on its own, but I will use wire rated for this anyway.

The reason I am using an extension cord rather than directly wiring this into the service is that I think it plugged in originally. I did some research and many gas units work like this. Also, there is an outlet in the cupboard under the cooktop that was obviously (it seems) put there for this purpose. But for some reason my unit came the plug cut off (I dunno, I didn't buy it). So I'm putting one back on. I'm basically treating this like putting a new plug on a busted toaster oven or something. Surely I can do a job such as that without an electrician!?

So based on some more research I'm thinking that wire nuts are the way to go for the splice, along with some electrical tape for added insulation. (Correct me if I'm wrong).

The only question I have is what to use for the plug. I would like to use something used (such as off an old appliance) so as not to contribute to landfills and also not to spend money. I am a big believer in reuse. Can anyone tell me how to judge if such a wire is adequate for this purpose?

Or if I must, I guess I can buy one. In such a case, what specs should I be looking for?

Thanks again, and sorry for being too vague earlier!
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Old 11-07-2012, 06:54 PM   #13
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What I would do I get the model number and order the OEM replacement cord. That way you won't be cutting and splicing anything. There is most likely a junction box within the top where the connections are intended to be made. Got a mfg. and model number?
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Old 11-07-2012, 07:20 PM   #14
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Yes, it's a thermador ggcv30. I tried to find a replacement cord but failed. Plus even if I could they're probably like $50 which I really don't have.

I was thinking of getting a replacement grounding plug from Lowes, they're like $5, and wiring the things into that. I think that would work fine as the dangling wires are long enough to reach the socket. Then I'd just finish it off with some electrical tape and the piece of sheathing that is on there now...
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Old 11-07-2012, 08:46 PM   #15
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You know, I have to admire your thrift and determination to reuse old parts. Yankee thrift. Unfortunately, no qualified electrician on this forum is likely to endorse your approach, since it almost certainly violates code, and a professional could certainly get into trouble for knowingly suggesting practices which violate code. I appreciate that $50 for parts is probably out of the question, since you likely got the unit for next to nothing. Good luck with the project.

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