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stan_d_bballman 11-16-2007 03:49 PM

dimmer switch circuit wiring
 
I'm planning to install low voltage puck lights under my kitchen cabinets controlled by a switch. I have relatively easy access to incoming power. I'm going to run pigtails from the live line to the switches -one to the existing switch and then one to the new dimmer switch I'm installing. I need to have two sets of lights since the low voltage transformers are 60W max. and now need to get power to both transformers. One transformer will require only a couple of feet of line to reach while the other will require about 25 feet since it's easier for me to go down into the basement and back up the other wall than ripping up my entire kitchen backsplash area. Here's where the questions come in.
First, I need to hard wire the transfomers and plan to do so in junction boxes with covers inside my kitchen cabinets. Is that within code? If not how does everyone do it since it seems to be a popular addition?
Second, can I just hard wire the 120v side of the transformers like mulitple outlets or lights (ie dimmer to first transformer and then hard wire in a run of line out from that transformer to the other one?) Or even simpler - can I run two lines out of the dimmer - one going to each respective transformer?
Third, I know I need to buy a dimmer designed for low voltage supplies and capable of handling 120W but does the distance of the run from the switch to the transfomer have to be factored in? Any limitations?

Thanks in advance

6mcmlxv5 11-16-2007 08:30 PM

Heres what I would do: assuming you want all the undercounter lights on a single swith: Run you a power feed to one side of the dimmer switch. run another feed downstairs into the basement from the other side of the switch and feed power to the transformers. You can "daisy chain" the transformers if you wish. Then run your low voltage wire back upstairs from the secondary side of each transformerto their respective set of lights. That short of distance should not effect the output of your lights. This too is assuming that you wish to be able to dim both sets of lights. If I can be of any further assistance feel free to email me.
Quote:

Originally Posted by stan_d_bballman (Post 74322)
I'm planning to install low voltage puck lights under my kitchen cabinets controlled by a switch. I have relatively easy access to incoming power. I'm going to run pigtails from the live line to the switches -one to the existing switch and then one to the new dimmer switch I'm installing. I need to have two sets of lights since the low voltage transformers are 60W max. and now need to get power to both transformers. One transformer will require only a couple of feet of line to reach while the other will require about 25 feet since it's easier for me to go down into the basement and back up the other wall than ripping up my entire kitchen backsplash area. Here's where the questions come in.
First, I need to hard wire the transfomers and plan to do so in junction boxes with covers inside my kitchen cabinets. Is that within code? If not how does everyone do it since it seems to be a popular addition?
Second, can I just hard wire the 120v side of the transformers like mulitple outlets or lights (ie dimmer to first transformer and then hard wire in a run of line out from that transformer to the other one?) Or even simpler - can I run two lines out of the dimmer - one going to each respective transformer?
Third, I know I need to buy a dimmer designed for low voltage supplies and capable of handling 120W but does the distance of the run from the switch to the transfomer have to be factored in? Any limitations?

Thanks in advance


frenchelectrican 11-17-2007 12:44 AM

Just a one stern warning here do not use the zip cord they are not approved to run inside the wall at all [ this is very strict on this matter ]

i dont know what approved LV wire can be run in the wall normally we most sparkys used the NM[ Romex or Loomex ] and run that in the wall and also with the hardwired undercabient lights they shall not be connected to any SABC at all [ this is very speficed in the code also ]

the other option we do from time to time is use the MC also.

and a final warning with LV luminaires make sure you be well aware with voltage drop this will show up more noticeable than the standard Line voltage luminaires will do.

Merci, Marc


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