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Old 03-25-2011, 11:20 AM   #16
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delay light after flipping switch


From personal experience with Hunter fans, just remove the stupid control box in the fan housing. Couple of snips, couple of small wirenuts, problem solved.

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Old 03-26-2011, 12:39 AM   #17
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delay light after flipping switch


I believe this is the problem. All connections are tight and there are separate switches for light & fan.

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Originally Posted by kbsparky View Post
Please be advised that many ceiling fans now incorporate a current-limiting device in them to prevent the use of too-large light bulbs in their light kits.

This can cause a slight delay in the light working once power is applied.

Normal operation, no testing or repairs are needed.
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Old 03-26-2011, 12:42 AM   #18
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delay light after flipping switch


No loose connection found. Think there is a delay in the current limiter device.
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Old 03-26-2011, 12:45 AM   #19
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delay light after flipping switch


two separate switches. Think the current limiter device now in the light circuits causes a delay.
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Old 03-26-2011, 08:48 AM   #20
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delay light after flipping switch


Quote:
Originally Posted by zpm
From personal experience with Hunter fans, just remove the stupid control box in the fan housing. Couple of snips, couple of small wirenuts, problem solved.

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Did you wear rubber-palmed gloves when you did this?
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Old 03-26-2011, 08:53 AM   #21
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delay light after flipping switch


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Did you wear rubber-palmed gloves when you did this?
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Old 03-26-2011, 11:34 AM   #22
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Did you wear rubber-palmed gloves when you did this?
No, I wore my arc flash gear.
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Old 03-29-2011, 01:41 PM   #23
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delay light after flipping switch


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Originally Posted by jlmran View Post
What are the rubber palmed gloves for?
Hi jlmran,

Normally, we try not to spend much time in forums.

Just the same, rubber-palmed gloves are rugged cloth knit gloves having a durable, rubber coating from the bottom of the palm side of the glove to just a bit up and over the thumb and finger tips.

They're used a lot in gardening, warehouses where lots of boxes are being manually shifted around, and when handling things which are difficult to keep a grip on.

Aside from gardening, these gloves are primarily used for gripping items which otherwise may be a bit more difficult to manage.

When we're working overhead, especially with light fixtures or anything with smooth surfaces, there's a lot of lifting, lowering, raising, and shifting activity.

In these cases, your palms and fingers naturally perspire. As a result, whatever you're trying to adjust, replace, lower, raise, etc...become less manageable. Without rubber-palmed gloves, you'd find yourself regularly pausing to wipe the perspiration from your palms and fingers in order not to smudge or to enable you to get a better grip on what you're working on.

This is especially so during the summer months.

Also, if you're using manual hand tools, these gloves provide more leverage, especially if what you're working on requires more than the normal degree of force to be loosened or to be broken loose.

They're also a form of safety protection around household electrical circuits which may have faulty shut off mechanisms or loose wires which may be part of a cluster, running parallel to a completely different outlet.

Electrical outlets aren't always connected the way we think they should be...especially, in older homes. Better to be safe than sorry.

Finally, we, at HGRB Services believe that you, as the homeowner/homerenter want to complete your projects as affordably, as conveniently, and as safely, as possible. Always wear safety glasses or safety goggles over your prescription glasses when you're doing anything overhead. Always wear the right sort of gloves for the job.

Nothing like a light fixture or the blade of a ceiling fan you're trying to install or remove, suddenly slipping through your hands, along your arm, and into your eye.

What we think is highly unlikely to happen, is what likely does because that's what we think.

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Old 03-29-2011, 03:07 PM   #24
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delay light after flipping switch


Quote:
Originally Posted by HGRBS View Post
Hi jlmran,

Normally, we try not to spend much time in forums.

Just the same, rubber-palmed gloves are rugged cloth knit gloves having a durable, rubber coating from the bottom of the palm side of the glove to just a bit up and over the thumb and finger tips.

They're used a lot in gardening, warehouses where lots of boxes are being manually shifted around, and when handling things which are difficult to keep a grip on.

Aside from gardening, these gloves are primarily used for gripping items which otherwise may be a bit more difficult to manage.

When we're working overhead, especially with light fixtures or anything with smooth surfaces, there's a lot of lifting, lowering, raising, and shifting activity.

In these cases, your palms and fingers naturally perspire. As a result, whatever you're trying to adjust, replace, lower, raise, etc...become less manageable. Without rubber-palmed gloves, you'd find yourself regularly pausing to wipe the perspiration from your palms and fingers in order not to smudge or to enable you to get a better grip on what you're working on.

This is especially so during the summer months.

Also, if you're using manual hand tools, these gloves provide more leverage, especially if what you're working on requires more than the normal degree of force to be loosened or to be broken loose.

They're also a form of safety protection around household electrical circuits which may have faulty shut off mechanisms or loose wires which may be part of a cluster, running parallel to a completely different outlet.

Electrical outlets aren't always connected the way we think they should be...especially, in older homes. Better to be safe than sorry.

Finally, we, at HGRB Services believe that you, as the homeowner/homerenter want to complete your projects as affordably, as conveniently, and as safely, as possible. Always wear safety glasses or safety goggles over your prescription glasses when you're doing anything overhead. Always wear the right sort of gloves for the job.

Nothing like a light fixture or the blade of a ceiling fan you're trying to install or remove, suddenly slipping through your hands, along your arm, and into your eye.

What we think is highly unlikely to happen, is what likely does because that's what we think.
No wonder consultants charge so much It takes then 200 words to describe a simple task (and someone has to pay for them words).

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