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bf514921 07-12-2012 08:05 PM

Definition of "rough electrical"
 
Would anyone have a definition or be able to point me to a definition of "rough electrical" I am in the process of a basement remodel. I have the electrical permit, and honestly a very responsive inspector, he answers my email same day i send. But i figured its not his job to teach me defninitions and alot of other things. Other than go read the code, is there a resorce i could referenc to determine what the technical definition of "rough electrical" is? Or is it clearly defined in the 2011 NEC. and yes that is the specification i must meet. Although there is a little bit of lee way i think on the arc fault protection.

thanks

tribe_fan 07-12-2012 08:16 PM

I'm sure a pro will be around, but I would ask the inspector to confirm. When I did my addition, rough in was defined as running the wire to the boxes and clamped properly, but no devices connected. No dry-wall installed so he can see it is properly ran, drilled through 2x4's, stapled etc. Things like outlet spacing would be looked at too.

Here is one link:

http://www.jamescitycountyva.gov/bui...ctric-res.html

jrclen 07-12-2012 08:24 PM

Rough in electrical is installing the boxes and the wires. This needs to be inspected prior to insulating and closing in the walls with drywall or other covering. Tribe Fan said it well.

Finish or trimming out is installing the switches, fixtures, and receptacles.

bobelectric 07-12-2012 08:26 PM

I'm with tribe fan,everything is ready to board up for finish.Wires tied through and grounds bonded to boxes.

bf514921 07-12-2012 09:58 PM

thanks for the responses i appreciate it, so would i need al my can lights installed and wires hanging out? i wil have strain relief connectors on the boxes.

k_buz 07-12-2012 10:26 PM

Strain relief connectors, or just connectors?

There would be no need for a true strain relief connector.

Techy 07-13-2012 12:47 AM

Rough electric is everything that has to be done before drywall. Boxes mounted, wire pulled, strapped. Some inspectors want grounds made up as well

bf514921 07-13-2012 05:28 AM

techy - , so would this mean then i would have to have my can lights installed and wired, witht he little door haging open?

k_bux - Strain relief, i know its over kill but hey, i am sure the wires wont move. Plus i though i read some regulation on spans of unsupported wire and strain relief connector, however i could be wrong.

Techy 07-13-2012 06:27 AM

I usually have the doors closed, if the inspector wants to look at the can he'll ask you to open one

jrclen 07-13-2012 08:37 AM

The can lights will be completely wired during rough in. I don't leave covers open.

I'm not sure what you mean by strain relief. If your doing it in romex you will need staples.

Jim Port 07-13-2012 10:16 AM

I think someone was just saying strain relief conectors would not be required but that regular cable connectors were fine.

bf514921 07-13-2012 07:37 PM

thanks for the info guys. jrclen, the strain reliev is for at the box for the can lights. something like this. http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/RAC...K50?Pid=search It sprobably overkill but ohwell.

staples for normal wire suppoert

jrclen 07-13-2012 09:29 PM

Okay, that is a normal romex connector. They work great.

electures 07-15-2012 11:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bf514921 (Post 964364)
Would anyone have a definition or be able to point me to a definition of "rough electrical" I am in the process of a basement remodel. I have the electrical permit, and honestly a very responsive inspector, he answers my email same day i send. But i figured its not his job to teach me defninitions and alot of other things. Other than go read the code, is there a resorce i could referenc to determine what the technical definition of "rough electrical" is? Or is it clearly defined in the 2011 NEC. and yes that is the specification i must meet. Although there is a little bit of lee way i think on the arc fault protection.

thanks

Please check out post #13 in this thread. This is what most inspectors I know as well as myself preferr seeing.

bf514921 07-15-2012 07:14 PM

thanks electures


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