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-   -   Dedicated outlet/receptacle (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/dedicated-outlet-receptacle-14919/)

drtpdee 12-30-2007 03:17 PM

Dedicated outlet/receptacle
 
Is it okay to have a dedicated receptacle on a non-dedicated circuit? I have a dedicated receptacle set up for a dehumidifier in a basement and have run it off of a split from power that supplies lights for a storage closet. Is that okay or do I need to have the dedicated receptacle on a dedicated circuit?:thumbup:

Andy in ATL 12-30-2007 04:24 PM

Technically, you need a dedicated recp. on a dedicated circuit. How hard is it to get back to the panel?

troubleseeker 12-30-2007 09:45 PM

BY definition, you cannot have a dedicated receptacle on a shared circuit. That is an oxymoron, like military intelligence:no:

goose134 12-30-2007 10:35 PM

As troubleseeker has said, a dedicated outlet is one outlet supplied by one circuit. That said, as long as the dehumidifier doesn't exceed the ampacity of the circuit, you can connect it to the storage light circuit.

jwhite 12-31-2007 08:12 AM

I am guessing that you got the need for the dedicated rec from the manufactures reccomendations in the instructions.

As stated. If the circuiit can handle the amps you will be fine.

So how to tell. Add the wattage of everything on the circuit. Do not count recs that have nothing plugged into them. Divide the wattage by 120 and if you have less than 12 amps on a 15 amp breaker, or 16 amps on a 20 amp breaker, you are fine.

drtpdee 01-02-2008 01:23 PM

Thanks to all who posted replies. The circuit will be fine in terms of both amps and wattage. The reason I asked is that the electrician who did the wiring when the house was built (2005) put in a single/dedicated receptacle on a circuit with the basement lights and duplex receptacles. Why? Not sure so I figured it would be worth asking. It will be easy for me to get a line into the subpanel, so I'll do that just to be in line with conventional thought and practice.

Andy in ATL 01-02-2008 03:00 PM

He would of failed his inspection if he did that here. That is assuming he got caught.:laughing: You'll be fine.

arichard21 01-03-2008 06:23 AM

drtpdee,

Are you refering to a single outlet? That doesn't make it "dedicated" as stated above, but I just wanted to clarify what type of recepticle you were refering to.

drtpdee 01-03-2008 08:10 AM

I meant a single outlet, circular style for a single three-pronged plug. I have one set up for a freezer which is on a dedicated circuit and plan to leave it that way. The current circuit that the dehumidifier is on is the same one described in the earlier email - it's the one that was installed when the house was built, but when it kicks on, the lights dim significantly and the breaker has tripped at least once in the past. The lights, the single and dual receptacles described earlier are all on that same circuit. I added a single receptacle closer to the sump pit so that the dehumidifier can drain right into the sump pit and so that it would be on a circuit with lights for a storage closet rather than lights for the general lighting of the room. That way, when the dehumidifier kicks on, the breaker wouldn't trip causing the general lights to go out AND hopefully so that the general lights wouldn't dim. Does that change things?

LawnGuyLandSparky 01-03-2008 01:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by drtpdee (Post 85111)
I meant a single outlet, circular style for a single three-pronged plug. I have one set up for a freezer which is on a dedicated circuit and plan to leave it that way. The current circuit that the dehumidifier is on is the same one described in the earlier email - it's the one that was installed when the house was built, but when it kicks on, the lights dim significantly and the breaker has tripped at least once in the past. The lights, the single and dual receptacles described earlier are all on that same circuit. I added a single receptacle closer to the sump pit so that the dehumidifier can drain right into the sump pit and so that it would be on a circuit with lights for a storage closet rather than lights for the general lighting of the room. That way, when the dehumidifier kicks on, the breaker wouldn't trip causing the general lights to go out AND hopefully so that the general lights wouldn't dim. Does that change things?

No.
Just because a singlex receptacle was used, doesn't mean is is, or that it's supposed to be on a "dedicated" circuit. A singlex receptacle is simply that - a singlex.

Inspectors like to see singlexs in areas where a non-gfci protected receptacle is being provided for a specific utilization device in an area where GFCI protection is generally required for all convenience receptacles. It also helps the homeowner figure out which receptacle is for an a/c when one is provided on a separate circuit.


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