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Old 04-12-2006, 03:05 PM   #1
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dedicated circuit for smoke detectors


Does code require a dedicated circuit for smoke detectors?I live in Md.,but I think most jurisdictions follow the national code.

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Old 04-12-2006, 03:10 PM   #2
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dedicated circuit for smoke detectors


My smoke detectors always run on 9v batteries. :confused:

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Old 04-12-2006, 07:21 PM   #3
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dedicated circuit for smoke detectors


There is no national code. Smoke detectors are NOT covered in the NEC. This is a building code issue.

It varies. Some want a dedicated circuit, some want them on a local lighting circuit.
Check with your local code office.
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Old 04-13-2006, 07:00 AM   #4
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dedicated circuit for smoke detectors


Our electrical inspector prefers you pull from a lighting circuit and they should be wired in series so when one alarms so do the rest.Thanks for the help.
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Old 04-13-2006, 04:27 PM   #5
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dedicated circuit for smoke detectors


Quote:
Originally Posted by wiggs
Our electrical inspector prefers you pull from a lighting circuit and they should be wired in series so when one alarms so do the rest.Thanks for the help.
They wont work if you wire them in serics. They have a seperate interconnect wire in addition to the power wires to cause the other ones to alarm if one does. Make sure that they are all the same brand and model, or that the mfg says they are compatable.
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Old 04-14-2006, 09:54 AM   #6
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dedicated circuit for smoke detectors


Here in NH, my town (and I suspect the entire state) requires that they be the interconnected type - the Fire Department will test them and fail you if they don't all go off when one trips.
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Old 04-14-2006, 10:37 AM   #7
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dedicated circuit for smoke detectors


Maybe series was an incorrect word.I ran a 3 wire between them so they all interconnect.Thanks for all the help.
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Old 04-15-2006, 05:39 AM   #8
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dedicated circuit for smoke detectors


I am not trying to be penantic, it is just that things are easily confused on the internet forums. I am trying to be sure that we are all understanding the same thing is going on
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Old 04-24-2006, 07:50 PM   #9
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dedicated circuit for smoke detectors


Run this past your local code office. Use all 120 volt, battery back-up with interconnect. In my jurisdiction, we pull a 12-2 cable from one of the devices within a bedroom (AFI circuit)and run it to the smoke detector in the same bedroom. We then daisychain a 12-3 to all the rest of the smoke detectors in the house. Remember that there must be a smoke detector in each bedroom and in the hallway that connects the bedrooms. The red wire serves as the interconnect wire so that when one sounds they all sound.
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Old 04-24-2006, 07:56 PM   #10
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dedicated circuit for smoke detectors


Sounds like a complete waste of wire to me. Why feed the smokes from each bedroom and also have a 3-wire between them? The 3-wire carries the feed and interconnect.
In fact it is illegal if you ask me. The circuit conductors MUST be in the same raceway or cable. You CANNOT use the neutral from one cable and the hot from another, even at low voltage (interconnect) IMO.
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Old 04-24-2006, 08:15 PM   #11
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dedicated circuit for smoke detectors


I'm sorry. I must not have explained myself very well. The power is taken from a device in the first bedroom. The power is carried from here to all other detectors through the black and white wires in the 12-3. The interconnect is supplied from the red wire.
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Old 04-24-2006, 08:25 PM   #12
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dedicated circuit for smoke detectors


From this:

"In my jurisdiction, we pull a 12-2 cable from one of the devices within a bedroom (AFI circuit)and run it to the smoke detector in the same bedroom."

.....I took it to mean you do this for each bedroom.

The way you describe now is how most folks do it.
I either pull it from a local circuit, or a dedicated circuit for just the smokes. Depends on the job.

Sorry for the misunderstanding.

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