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Old 03-30-2010, 07:05 PM   #1
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Dedicated 15A circuit for 450 watt appliance?


GE specifies a dedicated 15A 120v circuit for a warming drawer with a 450W element. Can you think of any reason why I wouldn't also plug my 600W built-in blender/food processor into this circuit?

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Old 03-30-2010, 07:08 PM   #2
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Dedicated 15A circuit for 450 watt appliance?


because fixed appliances are to be on dedicated circuits.

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Old 03-30-2010, 07:09 PM   #3
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Dedicated 15A circuit for 450 watt appliance?


Other then Code requires you to follow Mfg installation instructions
....No
Is there anything else at all that is part of it that might draw power ?
And while I follow code very closely that might be one area I fudge
The problem with an accessible outlet as part of that dedicated circuit you can't control what will be plugged into it

Does seem strange as my counter appliances take more power then that
Dishwasher (which can take 12a) can have the disposal on the same circuit
Over the stove microwave & hood fan can be on the same circuit in many cases
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Old 03-30-2010, 07:31 PM   #4
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Dedicated 15A circuit for 450 watt appliance?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Mariani View Post
because fixed appliances are to be on dedicated circuits.
Not quite. These is more to it that that.
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Old 03-30-2010, 08:03 PM   #5
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Dedicated 15A circuit for 450 watt appliance?


In this case, the outlet will be recessed and installed behind the appliance in a utility cabinet. The circuit board that regulates the temperature and operates the thermostat, etc., is the only other consumption. These things have a maximum temperature of 210 degrees.

The NEC has a provision for multiple wall ovens combined with a cooktop under 220.19, so I was thinking a similar scenario might work for small fixed appliances. I was hoping to avoid a subpanel for the kitchen.

Last edited by benjamincall; 03-31-2010 at 01:14 AM.
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Old 03-30-2010, 08:04 PM   #6
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Dedicated 15A circuit for 450 watt appliance?


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Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
Does seem strange as my counter appliances take more power then that
Dishwasher (which can take 12a) can have the disposal on the same circuit
Over the stove microwave & hood fan can be on the same circuit in many cases
Perhaps GE is just covering itself?
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Old 03-30-2010, 08:13 PM   #7
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Dedicated 15A circuit for 450 watt appliance?


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Originally Posted by benjamincall View Post
Perhaps GE is just covering itself?
I'd say so
They hopefully know it can't be on either of the Counter circuit
Can't be on the dishwasher circuit
Putting it on the same circuit as a microwave might trip a circuit
You don't want it on same circuit as a fridge
So that pretty much leaves a new circuit
450w is not 50% of a 15a circuit...so the 50% rule does not come into play
I'd say a 450w +600w would be OK

Does the warming drawer have a plug ? Or do they state to hard wire it ?
The outlet will be installed behind the warming drawer ? or the blender ?
If its behind the blender & the warming drawer is hard wired then that leaves a 3rd item that could be plugged in
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Old 03-30-2010, 08:54 PM   #8
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Dedicated 15A circuit for 450 watt appliance?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
I'd say so
They hopefully know it can't be on either of the Counter circuit
Can't be on the dishwasher circuit
Putting it on the same circuit as a microwave might trip a circuit
You don't want it on same circuit as a fridge
So that pretty much leaves a new circuit
450w is not 50% of a 15a circuit...so the 50% rule does not come into play
I'd say a 450w +600w would be OK

Does the warming drawer have a plug ? Or do they state to hard wire it ?
The outlet will be installed behind the warming drawer ? or the blender ?
If its behind the blender & the warming drawer is hard wired then that leaves a 3rd item that could be plugged in
The outlet will be behind the warming drawer. Both the blender and the warming drawer have plugs at this point. I would like to put my propane cooktop on the same circuit; I believe the load is comprised of the piezo igniter operation and the small indicator light that comes on when you lock out the knobs (child safety feature).

GE also specifies a dedicated circuit for the cooktop. I can't see running an individual circuit for an appliance that consumes less power than a cell phone. I can't put the cooktop on my wall oven/microwave circuit, because that circuit is 240v.

Last edited by benjamincall; 03-30-2010 at 08:59 PM.
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Old 03-30-2010, 08:59 PM   #9
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Dedicated 15A circuit for 450 watt appliance?


to scuba dave: the 50% rule for appliances only applies if other loads such as lighting are also on the circuit. Per art.210.23(A)(2). Sorry to correct you, most times your advice is right on.
Also if the mfg. recommends it and you dont do it. the warranty will be null and viod if anything happens

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