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Old 10-14-2012, 11:43 PM   #16
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If I wasn't between companies right now I would take some pics of the fuse panels that are used into the equipment I service
I respect that. I actually have already purchased the square d QO panel with 6 circuits. But I am thinking I would need a couple more. OK I could do it in 6 but I always over wire everything I do. This cabin will only be used maybe 20 days a year ( The wife will never come porta potti limited water no services for 30 miles, sage brush, scab land,BUT A GREAT FISHING LAKE AND THE HUNTING IS UNREAL)

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Old 10-15-2012, 01:32 AM   #17
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The reason you donít have a lot of Code on 12V off grid is there isnít a lot of it around.

Down steam of the breaker box, there is not a lot of fire risk or shock risk at 12VDC. It is upstream when you are dealing with the full current of the battery that you have higher risk. And as long as you are dealing with a single 12V panel, you have an open circuit voltage of maybe 22V DC. Or are you using a higher voltage panel with a MPPT charge controller ?

Wire nuts will be fine, I would just minimize the use of them. Because of the ĒcabinĒ description, I would be tempted to run conduit (either EMT or PVC) with THHN conductors. This is as much for varmint protection, as anything else. Iíd just surface mount it. If the wife wonít be there, she shouldnít complain.

I would be tempted to use a main breaker as a single point shut off in the panel. Having knife switches on the battery leads is also a handy safety feature. Iím assuming your 6 volt batteries are T105s or equivalent.
I would not roof mount the solar panel. If you do, you need to GFCI the solar panel leads down to the charge controller. If you are Hunting during snow season, getting up on the roof to brush snow off the panels is no fun and can be dangerous.

What are your cold weather plans for the batteries ? Are they going in an outdoor insulated battery box ? Are you taking them home for the winter ?
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Old 10-15-2012, 10:25 AM   #18
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I am using a morningstar 30 amp controller. I will think on the conduit idea. I had to look up what a knife switch was. that does look like a good idea.( do I mount them to a board??? I was planning on using agm batteries so I did not have to vent them and I think they will be coming home with me in the winter. I was thinking of putting the solar panel on a post so it swiveled and I could be a human solar tracker.
Good old fashioned wire nuts sounds easier than soldering.
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Old 10-15-2012, 02:12 PM   #19
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Never been a fan of wire nuts in a DC application. And fire is a risk even on 12 volt applications.
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Old 10-15-2012, 02:17 PM   #20
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so redman you would go with the solder as you suggested or the home runs??? soldering 4 or 5 wires together sounds like a pain but doable. Do you have any other connectors that you would suggest.
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Old 10-15-2012, 02:30 PM   #21
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12VDC may pose no shock risk, but the fire risk is significant. Perhaps greater in some ways than with 120V, because the fault current is lower by a factor of 10 and the operating current is higher by a factor of 10 for the same wattage. That makes it less likely to blow fuses or trip breakers when there is a short. Make sure you size your fuses carefully so they are just large enough to allow your loads to operate, but will actually blow in case of a fault.
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Old 10-15-2012, 02:54 PM   #22
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http://www.automationdirect.com/adc/...a-_Accessories
Stack a few of these next to each other and add one of the jumper bars make the connections nice and neat. They also have some that have a spot for a fuse
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Old 10-15-2012, 03:20 PM   #23
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12VDC may pose no shock risk, but the fire risk is significant. Perhaps greater in some ways than with 120V, because the fault current is lower by a factor of 10 and the operating current is higher by a factor of 10 for the same wattage. That makes it less likely to blow fuses or trip breakers when there is a short. Make sure you size your fuses carefully so they are just large enough to allow your loads to operate, but will actually blow in case of a fault.
OK first thank you redman for the sight. Second lets talk wire size because maybe my thinking is all wrong ( not the first time). I was going to have a 250 watt solar panel from there go to my 30amp controller with 10 gauge wire and an inline 30 amp fuse. then to my battery pack same wire and inline fuse then to cb panel same wire and inline fuse. Now coming out of my cb box I had planned on 10 gauge wire ( because some runs will be over 50 ft) 20amp square d QO breakers dc rated. The loads will mostly be quite light. ONE run for rv water pump. A couple others would have around 15 light bulbs that pull 200 mili amps each and a couple of runs to cigarette plugs to run small stuff like dc fans or small laptop or phone charger. My thinking was large wire because of the difference between ac and dc that whole factor of 10 thing that I am still trying to rap my brain around.
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Old 10-15-2012, 03:24 PM   #24
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Honestly I don't know for sure. I am more of a trouble shooter at work and not a trained/certified tech/enginer

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