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-   -   DC voltage (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/dc-voltage-11896/)

Alpha Crow 09-27-2007 05:02 PM

DC voltage
 
*dumb question alert* If two separate items require 6 volts each, do you supply them with 6 volts total, or does that mean 12 volts supply to complete the circuit?

NateHanson 09-27-2007 05:09 PM

The supply should be 6 volts.

slakker 09-27-2007 05:17 PM

6V but should be in parallel, not series...

elkangorito 09-27-2007 05:41 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Here is the answer.

Sammy 09-27-2007 06:40 PM

The two items would OPERATE at around six volts which would be the circuit voltage but how much power does each consume? Amps, Watts, etc?

If your using six 120 volt hairdryers on a 15 amp circuit you wouldnt load it with 720 volts....

elkangorito 09-27-2007 06:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sammy (Post 65183)
The two items would OPERATE at around six volts which would be the circuit voltage but how much power does each consume? Amps, Watts, etc?

If your using six 120 volt hairdryers on a 15 amp circuit you wouldnt load it with 720 volts....

Sammy, are you sure about this? Please explain!

Sammy 09-27-2007 06:55 PM

I am positively negative!

Its not volts its amps and watts you need to check power consumption.

The total available amps for the circuit needs to at least meet the power consumption of the two items in the circuit or somthing aint gonna work. Basic electricity...

elkangorito 09-27-2007 07:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sammy (Post 65188)
I am positively negative!

Its not volts its amps and watts you need to check power consumption.

The total available amps for the circuit needs to at least meet the power consumption of the two items in the circuit or somthing aint gonna work. Basic electricity...

Sorry Sammy but besides being wrong, you are not addressing the OP's question, which has nothing to do with power consumption.

Sammy 09-27-2007 07:28 PM

I may not always be right but I am never wrong [often]


A six volt circuit is a six volt circuit is a six volt circuit...

Whats the next thing this six volt circuit is gonna do?

elkangorito 09-27-2007 07:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sammy (Post 65193)
I may not always be right but I am never wrong [often]


A six volt circuit is a six volt circuit is a six volt circuit...

Whats the next thing this six volt circuit is gonna do?

Did you download the attachment in post #4? If not, download it. It will explain about series/parallel circuits.

Sammy 09-27-2007 08:00 PM

Didnt download as its not needed.

Familiar with both types of circuits.

Possibly the answer the poster was seeking was parallel circuit since it will provide a constant voltage to each component within reason but the original question was a little abstract.

elkangorito 09-27-2007 08:07 PM

The OP also posted a similar here;

http://www.diychatroom.com/showpost....57&postcount=1

Basically, he wants to connect 2 x 6 volt lights to a battery. Since he did not specify the voltage of the battery, there are 2 ways that it can be done.

1] Connect the lights in series & then connect this series circuit to a 12 volt battery.

2] Connect the lights in parallel & then connect the parallel circuit to a 6 volt battery.

Since it is a low voltage circuit, the wattage of the lights may have an impact on voltage drop, if the wiring is not big enough.

Sammy 09-27-2007 09:10 PM

Ahhhhhhhhhh


Wattage!

slakker 09-27-2007 09:48 PM

Though both circuits would work, I would still recommend the parallel circuit... in case on bulb burns out, the other would still operate... but as it was pointed out, it would depend on the wattage load and it would help if we understood what the application is...

I hate those series circuits... brings me back to those christmas lights where 1 bulb burns out and the whole string is off, then you got to check each bulb, yadadada... :laughing:

J. V. 09-28-2007 01:09 PM

Slakker,
Series AC & DC circuits are needed in many applications. Example would be a golf cart. Without the use of series connections where would you get a battery large enough to supply the cart.
With series circuits you can make most any voltage you need AC or DC.

Lets say you only had a 24 volt dc supply, but the lamp was 12 volts. You just connect two 12 volt lamps in series and off you go.

Elk was on the money. If he hooked up the 6 volt lights in series he would have only 3 volts to supply the lamps.


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