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Old 01-08-2009, 05:47 PM   #1
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Data and AC rules


I have several questions about running Cat6 wires....


What's the rule for wiring CAt 6 near power lines? Is there a certain distance I should keep away from the AC lines? And does it matter if only runs parallel next to AC lines for about 5 feet? I've read running exactly perpendicular should be ok but what about short distance parallel?

I know Cat 6 has tighter and more twists per inch so does it make ok to run next to 12v alarm / Air Conditioning wire? How about along side water pipes?

Also there are these structure wiring bundles that come with 2 RG6 and 2 Cat 6 all together in once sleeve. What's your take on these? Good? Will Cable TV or Satellite TV signals interfer with CAT 6 performance?

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Old 01-08-2009, 06:53 PM   #2
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Data and AC rules


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Originally Posted by genner View Post
I have several questions about running Cat6 wires....


What's the rule for wiring CAt 6 near power lines? Is there a certain distance I should keep away from the AC lines? And does it matter if only runs parallel next to AC lines for about 5 feet? I've read running exactly perpendicular should be ok but what about short distance parallel?

I know Cat 6 has tighter and more twists per inch so does it make ok to run next to 12v alarm / Air Conditioning wire? How about along side water pipes?

Also there are these structure wiring bundles that come with 2 RG6 and 2 Cat 6 all together in once sleeve. What's your take on these? Good? Will Cable TV or Satellite TV signals interfer with CAT 6 performance?

AS far as the NEC is concerned you can run them next to each other, but i'm sure someone else will give you 100 reasons not to.

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Old 01-08-2009, 07:47 PM   #3
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Data and AC rules


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AS far as the NEC is concerned you can run them next to each other, but i'm sure someone else will give you 100 reasons not to.

I would avoid doing it, but it won't make much difference. Unless it runs with it the entire length.

I'm lucky that I have to follow the 05 nec only.
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Old 01-08-2009, 08:11 PM   #4
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Data and AC rules


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I would avoid doing it, but it won't make much difference. Unless it runs with it the entire length.

I'm lucky that I have to follow the 05 nec only.
I doubt it would change anything if you ran it the entire way.
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Old 01-08-2009, 08:50 PM   #5
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Data and AC rules


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I doubt it would change anything if you ran it the entire way.

Visual on an analog set maybe, but I wouldn't waste all that coax just to avoid ac.
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Old 01-08-2009, 09:51 PM   #6
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Data and AC rules


what about for data/internet speeds? I'm assumming the coax won't affect the CAt6 right?
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Old 01-08-2009, 09:55 PM   #7
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what about for data/internet speeds? I'm assumming the coax won't affect the CAt6 right?
I dont worry about any low voltage cables, heck, I run them in the same holes as high voltage, not as a general practice, but I dont loose sleep over it either.
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Old 01-08-2009, 09:57 PM   #8
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Data and AC rules


Coax is well contained if the sheath isn't damaged and there are not stubs.

AC and Cat6 near each other is rarely a problem. In general, don't worry about it. You are a lot more likely to stuff up the connection with bad crimps or bending it with a too tight radius while pulling it.
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Old 01-08-2009, 10:19 PM   #9
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Data and AC rules


Not sure about Cat6, but I've got Cat5 running right along RG62 CATV for 8ft in a wall.

I would not expect any interference from NM type AC cable based on the fact that it is carrying AC current, since the net magnetic field created by current in the cable would be zero (as long as the hot and neutral are carrying the same current).

Honestly, I think the only time you will have any issues is when you run UTP along, and strapped to any metallic pipe, cable, or support member for more than a few feet.
In that case, there might be capacitive coupling which might change the impedance of the UTP.

I tend to agree with Gigs on the areas where you are more likely to lose data.

I'm not sure about code, but there are cables that are rated for in-wall use, and those that are not. I don't really know why for low-voltage, extremely limited current there would be any rules about this.
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Old 01-08-2009, 10:44 PM   #10
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Running AC parallel with Cat6 under a gigabyte network does affect internal network speeds. I have tested some in my home and I get a change in about 5mb/sec which for most normal people is nothing. But for me I transfer between 100/200gigs between 12 computers reguarly and it adds up. In regards to the internet unless you are on a T1 line you won't see any difference. The rule of thumb is to keep them as far apart as your situation can limit them to. If you have to its better to cross the AC then to run in parellel with it.

Also if you don't use proper Cat6 terminators or un-twist too much wire this can also affect speeds and you can get interferances which could cause lost or broken packets.

In the end if your're not running a GIG network with proper $300+ switches/hubs/routers you are not going to notice anything unless of course its running 100' or more parellel to it.
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Old 01-08-2009, 10:55 PM   #11
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I worked with a guy once that put 277 V on some jerkwad's ethernet drop! There was a pop, and a sizzle and some foul smoke, and one pissed off dude

p.s.: I do not condone this kind of behavior, but its pretty damn funny to watch.
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Old 01-09-2009, 07:12 AM   #12
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Data and AC rules


I don't care much about it, coax and cat 5/6 can run together, they can both run with ac.

I've found most of my interference problems from splitters, amps, grounding, and old cable.

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