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Old 08-25-2009, 07:10 AM   #16
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Is this a dangerous practice?


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Originally Posted by estevan8 View Post
Not really dangerous but definitely not to code. The same connection is made at the panel or main switch anyway. The reason that sharing a ground and neutral it is frowned on is that there is not suppose to be any intentional current flow on a ground conductor as that would create extra resistance on that ground making it less than optimal for protection.
That is not the reason at all, and it is "really dangerous".

If you use the ground as a neutral, if the ground were to become broken at some point between the load and the breaker box, then all the chassis on the circuit become hot.

I don't think you can call metal equipment chassis at 120v "not really dangerous".

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Old 08-25-2009, 08:30 AM   #17
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Is this a dangerous practice?


Thank you all for responding to my thread. I am going to go with the GFCI outlet. Quick question about those. Do they hook up just like the old plug did, or am I gonna have to do some special magic wiring to get this thing to work? I obviously have no clue about home electrical systems. Thanks alot, I really appriciate the help.
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Old 08-25-2009, 08:40 AM   #18
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Is this a dangerous practice?


Pretty please, with-sugar-on-top, if you use the GFCI but DO NOT have a functioning ground apply the handy little sticker that comes with the GFCI and says, "No Equipment Ground".

Sure, they aren't the most attractive addition. However, they serve a really important purpose: they prevent your new outlet from masquerading as something that it is not.
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Old 08-25-2009, 08:51 AM   #19
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Is this a dangerous practice?


All the GFCI's I have seen the stickers included say

"GFCI protected outlet"

I've yet to see a sticker that says

"No equipment ground"

with any of mine ??
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Old 08-25-2009, 08:58 AM   #20
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Is this a dangerous practice?


Ok, I understand that I should put up a sticker that says "no equiptment ground", but since I am the only one who will see the sticker, I am wondering what that warning means. What dangers am I warning myself of, or is the sticker decoration?
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Old 08-25-2009, 09:05 AM   #21
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Is this a dangerous practice?


It's to warn anyone else that may enter your house, or any future owner
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Old 08-25-2009, 09:08 AM   #22
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Is this a dangerous practice?


Right out of a yet-unused GFCI box. I wish my former home's owner had done me the service of using the labels. Also, it protects any person who might plug equipment that needs a ground into an ungrounded plug. Think: a contractor who comes to work at your house while you aren't there to point out all the ungrounded outlets and ends up damaging his equipment or (more importantly) himself.



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Last edited by Leah Frances; 08-25-2009 at 09:11 AM.
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Old 08-25-2009, 09:10 AM   #23
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Is this a dangerous practice?


Ok, mine only have the GFCI protected label
I do save all of my labels & label normal outlets that are downstream
I guess this is how HD sells them for a little le$$
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Old 08-25-2009, 09:25 AM   #24
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Is this a dangerous practice?


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What dangers am I warning myself of, or is the sticker decoration?
Lets say you have a ground fault and the hot wire is touching the metal chassis of your device internally.

Under your current situation, if you touch it you'd get shocked. If you were to sit the tool or device on something grounded, it could arc and start a fire.

Once you put the GFCI in, it would detect these sorts of ground faults, and trip... preventing you from getting a serious shock or from there being any serious fire hazard.

However, it's still not a real equipment ground.

There are a few scenarios where you could still have a dangerous situation. Suppose the chassis became energized by some external power like from another circuit that wasn't GFCI protected. In a fully grounded system that would trip the breaker and you'd be OK. In this case, the GFCI would let you get shocked since it doesn't see an imbalance on its circuit.

Also, things like surge suppressors won't work right without a real ground.

Anyway a GFCI outlet is a lot better than no ground with a regular outlet, but it's not entirely the same.
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Old 08-25-2009, 09:26 AM   #25
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I just found another set of stickers & they do have the "No equipment ground" sticker
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Old 08-25-2009, 09:49 AM   #26
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Thank you all once again. Not to exclude anyone elses help, but I have to Gigs a extra thanks for explaining why it is important. I like to know why things work and that was a great and easy to understand explaination. Thanks again for all your help, this site is priceless.
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Old 08-25-2009, 11:02 AM   #27
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Is this a dangerous practice?


Adapters are very dangerous and should never be used. If you look in the NEC you'll find that the only safe way to replace a two prong outlet is to either repull a 3 wire properly grounded system to a new 3 wire recepticle, or to install a GFCI outlet in it's place.
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Old 08-25-2009, 12:36 PM   #28
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Is this a dangerous practice?


Between my wife & I we have about 7 of these adapters
Living in Apts you are not allowed to replace outlets or run new wire
Landlords are not required to update wiring etc that met code when it was installed
A lot of rental properties very rarely get remodeled - only painted
So the only way for a lot of people is to use adapters
I keep one in each toolbox
When we moved in the entore basement was wired w/2 prong outlets
Only 1 circuit was a 2 wire system
But it wasn't a priority to upgrade the circuits

The adapters themselves are not dangerous...how they are used can be
Overloading them, plugging in a power strip....
Not securing them from falling out (never secured one myself)
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Old 08-25-2009, 08:18 PM   #29
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Is this a dangerous practice?


Scuba Dave (28? I think.) You make a very strong point in the last paragraph.
There is nothing inherently unsafe about the adapters. Or else the UL and the CSA (Two of the topmost prestigious and reliable certifying organizations) would not list them! They're not a cover all end all solution. There are certain conditions and methods to use them. And the particular outlet should always be tested for ground. Ideally, the receptacle should be changed to a Three Prong, self grounding one. But where it's difficult to change, they're perfectly OK to use on a temporary basis! Eliminate Confusion through Education! Now more than ever Don't Drink and Drive!!!
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Old 08-26-2009, 12:38 PM   #30
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Is this a dangerous practice?


I actually thought of an ongoing use I have
The timers (inside) that I use for my Christmas decoration are 2 prong
Some of the decorations are 3 prong, so in some cases I'm still stuck using them

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