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Old 07-11-2012, 06:38 PM   #1
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Is a crimped neutral code?


House in Idaho, US built in 1971. I'm installing a bathroom vanity light fixture on the wall and unwrapped electrical tape to find the attached crimped neutral connection. Looks like this was done when the house was built, as the electrical tape wrapping the crimp still had drywall mud splatter on it. Code? Rip out and wirenut, or leave be? The ground connection is like this too. Thanks,
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Old 07-11-2012, 06:45 PM   #2
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Is a crimped neutral code?


While those crimps are fine for a grounding connection a connection for a neutral should have been insulated.

Those conductors were cut way too short.

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Old 07-11-2012, 07:36 PM   #3
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Is a crimped neutral code?


Wire nut the connection.
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Old 07-11-2012, 07:41 PM   #4
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Is a crimped neutral code?


Good thing they put that extra piece of insulation back on after the crimp...
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Old 07-11-2012, 08:14 PM   #5
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Is a crimped neutral code?


Take it for what its worth but I guarantee every connection in your entire house is made the same way.
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Old 07-11-2012, 08:22 PM   #6
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Is a crimped neutral code?


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Originally Posted by jimmy21 View Post
Take it for what its worth but I guarantee every connection in your entire house is made the same way.
No doubt...
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Old 07-11-2012, 09:47 PM   #7
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Is a crimped neutral code?


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Take it for what its worth but I guarantee every connection in your entire house is made the same way.
So... these were code-approved in 1971?
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Old 07-11-2012, 09:54 PM   #8
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Is a crimped neutral code?


I don't believe so. I also don't believe that romex is original...I think it had been added at some point after the home was built.
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Old 07-11-2012, 10:11 PM   #9
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Is a crimped neutral code?


that's what we call a buchanan crimp. It takes a special four point crimper to crimp them right. Still use them everyday at work. It's considered a better connection than a wirenut and when they actually will let us make joints on fire alarm systems that's how they have to be done. What's missing from the picture is the little plastic cap that pops over the crimp to insulate it. Once the cap is pushed on you can't take it back out. They're about as permanent a connection as you can get without welding or soldering.

edit: to answer your question it is a code approved method of splicing but definitely not if it's left bare. you can buy the caps seperate from the actual crimps so that may be something you look getting, much cheaper to just wirenut it.
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Last edited by andrew79; 07-11-2012 at 10:17 PM.
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Old 07-12-2012, 07:35 AM   #10
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Is a crimped neutral code?


Majority of the homes built in 1971 in my area have the Buchanan crimps on various junction points. As Andrew stated, good solid connection, better than wire nuts. And a lot quicker to do than wire nutting.
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Old 07-12-2012, 05:01 PM   #11
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Is a crimped neutral code?


Not to start a fist fight here, but I don't see how that crimp is 'better' than a wire nut, I consider them the same, but different. I still use ground crimps because they are 'easier' not 'better' to install. okay, back to are normal programming.
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Old 07-12-2012, 05:28 PM   #12
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Is a crimped neutral code?


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Not to start a fist fight here, but I don't see how that crimp is 'better' than a wire nut, I consider them the same, but different. I still use ground crimps because they are 'easier' not 'better' to install. okay, back to are normal programming.
that crimp won't ever come apart, you have to cut it to separate the wires. Any number of things can go wrong with a wire nut, the inside can come loose from the outside, wires can be pulled out if not done right, wires can break from over twisting. Granted a professional should never have an issue with a wirenut but it does happen sometimes. Better may not be the right word, less margin for error is probably a better way to put it. Electrically speaking the connection is no better either way
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Old 07-12-2012, 05:30 PM   #13
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Is a crimped neutral code?


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that crimp won't ever come apart, you have to cut it to separate the wires. Any number of things can go wrong with a wire nut, the inside can come loose from the outside, wires can be pulled out if not done right, wires can break from over twisting. Granted a professional should never have an issue with a wirenut but it does happen sometimes. Better may not be the right word, less margin for error is probably a better way to put it. Electrically speaking the connection is no better either way
Hogwash, both are only as good as the installer, you know how many people install these by just squeezing down on them with pliers? They would be better off using a wire nut.
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Old 07-12-2012, 05:57 PM   #14
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Is a crimped neutral code?


That was and is still legal.

Have you ever seen soldered connections?

I'm not saying I would do it, but I have seen it many times.
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Old 07-12-2012, 06:13 PM   #15
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Is a crimped neutral code?


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That was and is still legal.

Have you ever seen soldered connections?

I'm not saying I would do it, but I have seen it many times.
I have seen a pigtail installed with a cap, which is legal, I don't see how taping the crimp is acceptable....


http://www.idealindustries.com/media...-insulated.jpg

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