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Old 08-24-2010, 12:46 AM   #1
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crimped grounds?


1975 house -- all the J boxes I've had to rewire turn out to have the various ground wires crimped together with about 1/2 to 1 inch of wire left between the crimp and the romex where it enters the box. I can't even imagine any way to pigtail a new ground off of this crimp splice so I end up adding a new jbox either above or below which I use to just splice in new romex. Then the exisiting box gets moved up or down depending on whether I added the new splice box below or above (respectively). New box gets dead front cover. PITA and moderately ugly.

Any alternatives? Was this standard practice in 1975? I assume it met code then as the electrical was definitely inspected.

Oh yeah, on the jbox I just redid there was no pigtail off the ground splice. Box is plastic (union box) and the devices are both switches so I guess no need to ground anything in 1975.
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Old 08-24-2010, 12:53 AM   #2
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crimped grounds?


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Originally Posted by philS View Post
1975 house -- all the J boxes I've had to rewire turn out to have the various ground wires crimped together with about 1/2 to 1 inch of wire left between the crimp and the romex where it enters the box. I can't even imagine any way to pigtail a new ground off of this crimp splice so I end up adding a new jbox either above or below which I use to just splice in new romex. Then the exisiting box gets moved up or down depending on whether I added the new splice box below or above (respectively). New box gets dead front cover. PITA and moderately ugly.

Any alternatives? Was this standard practice in 1975? I assume it met code then as the electrical was definitely inspected.

Oh yeah, on the jbox I just redid there was no pigtail off the ground splice. Box is plastic (union box) and the devices are both switches so I guess no need to ground anything in 1975.
Why can't you remove the crimp, add your ground, and recrimp?
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Old 08-24-2010, 07:38 AM   #3
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crimped grounds?


"Why can't you remove the crimp, add your ground, and recrimp?"

what he said, and use stranded wire to add flexibility for your connection
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Old 08-24-2010, 09:14 AM   #4
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crimped grounds?


Crimping the grounds is still acceptable. Merely twisting the grounds together is not acceptable.

It is unfortunate that the ground wires are only 1-1/2 inches long altogether, crimp or no crimp.

I could solder on a pigtail and make an almost indestructable connection, but I am told that soldering is not acceptable.
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Old 08-24-2010, 01:07 PM   #5
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crimped grounds?


Yup. But were 1/2 inch leads acceptable or legal in 1975?
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Old 08-24-2010, 05:44 PM   #6
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crimped grounds?


I don't think 1-1/2 inch ground leads were ever legal but if you have them then you are stuck with them. Unless there is more slack in the cables and you can pull more into the box and strip off more jacket.

If the ground leads are crimped 1-1/2 inch from the jacket and another 4-1/2 inches protrudes beyond the crimp (total of 6 inches of conductor) then you are okay.
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Old 08-24-2010, 07:01 PM   #7
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crimped grounds?


is this a manufactured home? If so, they were not bound by the NEC but other codes and the short grounds and crimps are typical.


the best way I have found to deal with it is the same as others mentioned: cut the crimp, add the new egc and install a new crimp on connector.

and yes allanJ, you cannot rely on just a solder connection. That is actually kind of funny since before wirenuts were common, twisted and soldered joints were the norm.
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Old 08-24-2010, 11:49 PM   #8
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crimped grounds?


Nope, not a manufactured home.

And there's no ground wire at all extending beyond the crimps.

Oh well, I have no plans for any further electrical work and two dead-front boxes aren't a big problem. In general the original electrical work was done carefully and neatly and it was inspected, so I just wondered if this might have been code-compliant in 1975.
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Old 08-25-2010, 04:45 PM   #9
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crimped grounds?


not that I am aware of. as far back as I can remember, there has been a requirement to have a certain length of conductor in the box. Maybe one of the other guys has an older NEC they can check. I do not believe I have one prior to 83, I think.
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