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Old 02-12-2009, 05:58 PM   #1
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Cost of Electricity??


Since Watts = Voltage x Amperage

.....am I paying more because I have an average incoming voltage of 124 volts instead of 120 volts??

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Old 02-12-2009, 06:17 PM   #2
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Cost of Electricity??


you pay based what you use not what have available

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Old 02-12-2009, 06:20 PM   #3
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Cost of Electricity??


Quote:
Originally Posted by Winchester View Post
Since Watts = Voltage x Amperage

.....am I paying more because I have an average incoming voltage of 124 volts instead of 120 volts??
Short version....Not really. For example, the element of your heater is hotter, so it runs less, so work is about the same. Watts are watts. Maybe on your incandescent lighting.

Longer version....there's not much you can do about it, since the POCO can't do much about it either (depending where you are on the line). POCO's use voltage regulators that keep the voltage within a certain range, and are set up to not overvoltage the first guy without undervoltaging the last guy.
For example, we try to maintain a delivery voltage between 126 and 118 volts. The customer closest to the regulator gets 126, the one at the end of the line gets 118. The one in the middle gets the closest to the nominal of 120. There's no such thing as maintaining a constant 120 volts unless you are willing to cough up the money for your own equipment (which wouldn't be worth it unless you have a voltage sensitive manufacturing system (i.e., robotics or silicon production) that requires it.
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Old 02-12-2009, 06:50 PM   #4
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Cost of Electricity??


If you have a fixture with a rated watt load it will use the same load in watts at 120 and 124 or 114 volts. the amps will change to accomodate the load but 60w is 60w any way you slice it.
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Old 02-12-2009, 07:45 PM   #5
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Cost of Electricity??


Your 120v incandescents will last 100[(120/124)^16] = ~60% of their rated life.

"For a supply voltage V,
Light output is approximately proportional to V^3.4
Power consumption is approximately proportional to V^1.6
Lifetime is approximately proportional to V^−16
Color temperature is approximately proportional to V^0.42"

Last edited by Yoyizit; 02-12-2009 at 07:55 PM.
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Old 02-12-2009, 09:21 PM   #6
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Cost of Electricity??


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Originally Posted by Yoyizit View Post
Your 120v incandescents will last 100[(120/124)^16] = ~60% of their rated life.

"For a supply voltage V,
Light output is approximately proportional to V^3.4
Power consumption is approximately proportional to V^1.6
Lifetime is approximately proportional to V^−16
Color temperature is approximately proportional to V^0.42"
I love it when you talk like that.
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Old 02-13-2009, 11:42 AM   #7
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Cost of Electricity??


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I love it when you talk like that.
You might be in the minority. . .
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Old 02-16-2009, 12:05 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by ctsmiths View Post
If you have a fixture with a rated watt load it will use the same load in watts at 120 and 124 or 114 volts. the amps will change to accomodate the load but 60w is 60w any way you slice it.
I don't see it. V=IR. The volts and amps are directly correlated since the resistance does not vary. The more amps, the more watts.

For a 100 watt bulb the resistance will be 144 Ohms and at 120 Volts the current will be .8333 amps.
120=.8333*144

If you bump it to 124 volts
124/144=.86

Using power=R*I^2
144*.86^2=107 Watts

On a lighter note, 100 Amps of survice will be able to power more at 124 Volts than 120 volts.
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Old 02-16-2009, 11:10 AM   #9
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Cost of Electricity??


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I don't see it. V=IR. The volts and amps are directly correlated since the resistance does not vary. The more amps, the more watts.

For a 100 watt bulb the resistance will be 144 Ohms and at 120 Volts the current will be .8333 amps.
120=.8333*144

If you bump it to 124 volts
124/144=.86

Using power=R*I^2
144*.86^2=107 Watts

On a lighter note, 100 Amps of survice will be able to power more at 124 Volts than 120 volts.
V = IR but the R for an incandescent lamp is affected by I. "Cold" R is 10x to 15x less than "hot" R.
This equation is hidden in the relationships that Wiki posts for incandescents.
"Power consumption is approximately proportional to V^1.6"
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Old 02-16-2009, 03:23 PM   #10
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Cost of Electricity??


fact remains, that the higher the voltage, the higher the power usage.
(124/120)^1.6~ 105%.

You also have to consider that many things do not follow the same properties as incadescent light bulbs. Copper wiring for example has a higher resistance as it heats up.

Is the OP paying more? Yes. Is there much can be done about it? No.
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Old 02-16-2009, 04:10 PM   #11
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Cost of Electricity??


40A buck-boost xformer, $350.
Payback period=???
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Old 02-16-2009, 04:16 PM   #12
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Cost of Electricity??


Quote:
Originally Posted by joey b View Post
fact remains, that the higher the voltage, the higher the power usage.
(124/120)^1.6~ 105%.

You also have to consider that many things do not follow the same properties as incadescent light bulbs. Copper wiring for example has a higher resistance as it heats up.

Is the OP paying more? Yes. Is there much can be done about it? No.
So in the winter you could say that for the northernhalf of the country,energy consumption should fall because the copper is colder= less resistance
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Old 02-16-2009, 04:46 PM   #13
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Cost of Electricity??


yeah, because the amount of heat put off has a huge impact on the amount of petroleum used to heat homes.
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Old 02-16-2009, 04:55 PM   #14
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Cost of Electricity??


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So in the winter you could say that for the northernhalf of the country,energy consumption should fall because the copper is colder= less resistance
The efficiency does increase by a small amount because of it. I'm sure if a power company cared to measure they could easily see the lowered wire loss.
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Old 02-16-2009, 05:05 PM   #15
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The efficiency does increase by a small amount because of it. I'm sure if a power company cared to measure they could easily see the lowered wire loss.
Knowing the tempco of copper you can pull this info out of table 310-16 in the NEC. The R for copper increases by 1.3x for a 100℃ temp rise above +20℃. It's a messy calc. and it's approximate.

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