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Old 08-09-2006, 02:06 PM   #1
Rze
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Connecting a 240 Circuit


I am reading that you should not connect both hot wires of a 240 circuit to the same leg of power. This is so the nuetral doesn't overheat. Is this correct?
I assume that if your panel has alternating lugs (wrong term, however I mean every other breaker on one side alternates A and B phase), then a 2 pol breaker would work. If not, the you need a single pole on each side. The second sounds more dangerous since someone might shut off one breaker but not the other.

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Old 08-09-2006, 02:53 PM   #2
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Connecting a 240 Circuit


I guess in theory you are right. Except that 240v does NOT use or require a neutral. There is literally no place to terminate it. So there is NO neutral to overheat.
If you connect both legs of a 240v circuit to the same phase you will get nothing across them, but 120v to ground across each...if that makes sense.

Now.... if you are referring to a 120/240v or multi-wire (shared neutral) circuit then that is a different story. A story more like you explained.

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Old 08-09-2006, 05:15 PM   #3
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Connecting a 240 Circuit


MY bad. I meant ground, not nuetral. Not really sure about your statement that " If you connect both legs of a 240v circuit to the same phase you will get nothing across them, but 120v to ground across each...if that makes sense"

It sounds like this supports the answer to me question and that both hots should be on different phases. Still not really sure why, though.....
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Old 08-09-2006, 05:56 PM   #4
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Connecting a 240 Circuit


The only time the ground carries current is under a fault, so it will never get hot if it is connected properly. It is there as a saefty net.

What I mean about the voltage is if both hots are on the same phase they will both have 120v on them (to ground). But between them is nothing. It would be as if you touched the tester leads on the same buss bar. They would not read anything.
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