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-   -   connecting a 14-3 to a 14-2 in a junction box. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/connecting-14-3-14-2-junction-box-32885/)

brocasArea001 11-30-2008 03:04 PM

connecting a 14-3 to a 14-2 in a junction box.
 
There's a junction box in my kitchen that has a 14-3 form the source and two 14-2's spliced out from it. The red going to the first 14-2 and the black going to the other 14-2.

I want to remove one of the 14-2's because I no longer need it. Is it safe to just connect the red AND black from the 14-3 to the black of one 14-2? Or should I get rid of the 14-3 all together from the source and run 14-2 so that my junction box will connect to 14-2's together?


hopefully the question makes sense.

thanks.

jamiedolan 11-30-2008 03:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brocasArea001 (Post 191873)
There's a junction box in my kitchen that has a 14-3 form the source and two 14-2's spliced out from it. The red going to the first 14-2 and the black going to the other 14-2.

I want to remove one of the 14-2's because I no longer need it. Is it safe to just connect the red AND black from the 14-3 to the black of one 14-2? Or should I get rid of the 14-3 all together from the source and run 14-2 so that my junction box will connect to 14-2's together?


hopefully the question makes sense.

thanks.

DO not connect the red and black. This sounds like a multi wire branch circuit, connecting the 2 hot legs (red and black) will cause a direct short.

Why not just put a wire nut on the wire you are no longer using, then it can remain there for future use? I am not sure why you would need to connect it to another wire, maybe I am missing something?

Jamie

Stubbie 11-30-2008 03:55 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Jamie is correct.

What you have is a split multiwire and was probably used to provide the required 2 twenty amp small appliance circuits to the kitchen. This is a code requirement. How you provide those 2 twenty amp branch circuits can vary to the discretion of the electrician.
The 12/3 in the junction box will be connected to a double pole breaker or to 2 single pole breakers on opposite legs. The red and black wires share the neutral from the jb to the breaker panel. It looks something like the image I attached depending on how the electrician wired the gfci protection for the kitchen counter top receptacles.

Exactly what did you do that would not require the one leg of the split multiwire?

Wildie 11-30-2008 05:34 PM

I would cap the red in the junction box and remove the other end of the red from the breaker in the panel!

jamiedolan 11-30-2008 05:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wildie (Post 191923)
I would cap the red in the junction box and remove the other end of the red from the breaker in the panel!

If you disconnect it from it "companion" wire in the panel, I would make sure that it is bundled (taped / tied) to the other wire or otherwise identified if it stays in the panel. I could see this leading to confusion and a dangerous situation in the future if it is not labeled and someone goes to reconnect it, and it does not land on the correct leg of the panel. Tape and a proper note on the circuit breaker panel list will sove the problem (the possiable future problems).

Jamie

brocasArea001 11-30-2008 06:19 PM

It's pretty much what's pictured in the attachment provided by Stubie.

The previous owner's builder *I think* intended to have a cloths washer in the kitchen..in a closet. there's evidence of where the dryer vent would go.

Instead the previous owner put in some cabinets with a small sink, like a butler pantry. I've removed the pantry and am trying to open up the kitchen a bit.

Now there's an outlet sitting all by itself about 4 ft off the ground. It's power comes from the junction box 14/3 red wire. The wire to the outlet is just dangling the outside the wall (used to be behind the pantry cabinets)

I think I'll disconnect the red from the breaker box and label appropriately.

rgsgww 11-30-2008 06:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brocasArea001 (Post 191949)
It's pretty much what's pictured in the attachment provided by Stubie.

The previous owner's builder *I think* intended to have a cloths washer in the kitchen..in a closet. there's evidence of where the dryer vent would go.

Instead the previous owner put in some cabinets with a small sink, like a butler pantry. I've removed the pantry and am trying to open up the kitchen a bit.

Now there's an outlet sitting all by itself about 4 ft off the ground. It's power comes from the junction box 14/3 red wire. The wire to the outlet is just dangling the outside the wall (used to be behind the pantry cabinets)

I think I'll disconnect the red from the breaker box and label appropriately.

Make sure the breaker is 15 amps if it is 14 awg.

Stubbie 11-30-2008 07:55 PM

I went out on a limb assuming this multiwire was installed by an electrician for the small appliance branch circuits and was 12 awg not 14 awg. However it sounds like you are sure it is 14 and was homeowner installed by the previous occupant.

Personally I would make use of the one (red) leg rather than cap it off. Maybe the dishwasher, garbage disposal, fridge or something like lights could be used for your remodel. If it is indeed 14 awg then you would not use it for countertop receptacles these must be 20 amp branch circuits and 12 awg.

kbsparky 11-30-2008 08:04 PM

If the OP is in Canada, then using a #14 wire is perfectly appropriate for SA use.

Stubbie 11-30-2008 09:04 PM

All the more reason to find a use for it .....:thumbsup:


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