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-   -   Connect a 14-2 to a 10-2 (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/connect-14-2-10-2-a-160321/)

Ncs0816 10-16-2012 08:33 PM

Connect a 14-2 to a 10-2
 
The gauges are so different. Should I solder them together or twist them together and cap them

drwheels 10-16-2012 09:06 PM

If either was done you would limit yourself to a 15 amp breaker from using 14-2. 10-2 is usually on a 30 amp breaker and a fire hazard would result if 14-2 connected to it.

darren 10-16-2012 09:09 PM

It is possible to twist them together but not the easy job if you have never done it. Strip lots of copper and try bending the #10 around the #14.

joecaption 10-16-2012 09:47 PM

What is it your really trying to do?
I'd hate to see someone get hurt.

Ncs0816 10-16-2012 10:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1032314)
What is it your really trying to do?
I'd hate to see someone get hurt.

I'm tring to run 100 feet of 10-2 to a new outlet at the end of my driveway. The existing outlet had a 14-2 and will be using for power

joecaption 10-16-2012 10:14 PM

Why 10-2? Seem a little over kill for just an outlet? What do you plan on powering?

Ncs0816 10-16-2012 10:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 1032338)
Why 10-2? Seem a little over kill for just an outlet? What do you plan on powering?

I'm using it. 10-2 will prevent more loss of volts. Correct?

CheapCharlie 10-17-2012 11:32 AM

Sure, but the voltage drop depends on what load you have on the circuit. At only 100 feet I don't think you'd have to worry about it.

Dave632 10-17-2012 11:50 AM

For a 100' run (200' total circuit length):
  • #14 = 0.505 ohms
  • #12 = 0.318 ohms
  • #10 = 0.200 ohms
  • (source)
Voltage drop, assuming a 15 Amp load (max for #14):
  • #14 = ~7.5 volts
  • #12 = ~4.8 volts
  • #10 = ~3.0 volts
Whether the 4.5 volt difference is worth the extra cost and trouble of using #10 is up to you.

CheapCharlie 10-17-2012 12:12 PM

Where are you from? If from Canada, the voltage drop is limited by code to 3% on a branch circuit.

jbfan 10-17-2012 12:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CheapCharlie (Post 1032604)
Where are you from? If from Canada, the voltage drop is limited by code to 3% on a branch circuit.

It is just a recommendation in the states, not a code issue.

CheapCharlie 10-17-2012 12:31 PM

That's why I posted that. Doesn't say in his profile

Ncs0816 10-17-2012 06:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave632 (Post 1032594)
For a 100' run (200' total circuit length):
  • #14 = 0.505 ohms
  • #12 = 0.318 ohms
  • #10 = 0.200 ohms
  • (source)
Voltage drop, assuming a 15 Amp load (max for #14):
  • #14 = ~7.5 volts
  • #12 = ~4.8 volts
  • #10 = ~3.0 volts
Whether the 4.5 volt difference is worth the extra cost and trouble of using #10 is up to you.

Is the total length 200?

Ncs0816 10-17-2012 06:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CheapCharlie (Post 1032614)
That's why I posted that. Doesn't say in his profile

Live in virginia

stickboy1375 10-17-2012 06:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ncs0816 (Post 1032269)
The gauges are so different. Should I solder them together or twist them together and cap them

Just use wire nuts, align the ends and install wirenut.


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