Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Electrical

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-12-2012, 11:03 PM   #1
Renovating My Land Yacht
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Gulf Coast MS
Posts: 536
Rewards Points: 538
Default

Confusing info from the county re GFCI


Called the county the other day on the requirements on GFCI's in the kitchen. Currently we have none and were going to add one. my understanding was that the requirement is 2 in the kitchen.

I was told by the county that every plug in the kitchen must be a GFCI per code.

I'm trying to figure this one out. If the first plug on a run is a GFCI then everything down from the GFCI is protected, what do you gain by all of them being a GFCI? Am I missing something?

forcedreno2012 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2012, 11:11 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 26,987
Rewards Points: 3,090
Default

Confusing info from the county re GFCI


There is nothing to gain. You only need one at the begining of each circut to protect the rest of the outlets.
Just make sure your incoming line is connected to the line side and the power going out is connected to the load side.

joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2012, 11:33 PM   #3
Member
 
joed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Welland, Ontario
Posts: 7,855
Rewards Points: 2,504
Blog Entries: 4
Default

Confusing info from the county re GFCI


Every plug must be GFCI protected. They don not have to be actual GFCI receptacles. One GFCI can protect others that are regular receptacles.
__________________
Do not PM with questions that can be asked in a forum. I will not respond.
joed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2012, 11:59 PM   #4
" Euro " electrician
 
frenchelectrican's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: WI & France { in France for now }
Posts: 5,369
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Confusing info from the county re GFCI


You can use one GFCI receptale at the starting point as the first receptale on that circuit.

As other mention make sure you pay attetion to the line and load connection if you get them cross conntion it will not work.

The other thing it will show up once a while is red conductor if you have them stop right there and let us know we will assit you on this one due it is tricky to deal with it.

Merci,
Marc
__________________
The answer will be based on NEC ( National Electrical code ) or CEC ( Cananda Electrical code ) or ECF ( Electrique Code France )
frenchelectrican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2012, 04:43 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Buffalo NY
Posts: 53
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Confusing info from the county re GFCI


Great point Marc...as allways..!....MWBC"s are very common in kitchens ...also don't be surprised if you need 2 gfics.... now it is code to run 2 small appliance cirs....but we don't know if that is the case in your home...test all the receps in the kitchen to see whats what 1 cir, 2 cir, 3? good luck
Bobka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2012, 06:09 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Nashua, NH, USA
Posts: 6,965
Rewards Points: 2,026
Default

Confusing info from the county re GFCI


Quote:
Originally Posted by forcedreno2012 View Post
Called the county the other day on the requirements on GFCI's in the kitchen. Currently we have none and were going to add one. my understanding was that the requirement is 2 in the kitchen.

I was told by the county that every plug in the kitchen must be a GFCI per code.

I'm trying to figure this one out. If the first plug on a run is a GFCI then everything down from the GFCI is protected, what do you gain by all of them being a GFCI? Am I missing something?
There could be a local code requiring a ground fault circuit interrupter at each outlet box so that you don't have to go searching for the reset button if you get a trip. Ask to see the applicable code documents at your town hall. If all they go by is the National Electric Code and the hot conductor does not share a neutral with another hot conductor, then you don't need an individual GFCI at each outlet box.

A multiwire branch circuit (hot conductors sharing a neutral) can come into a box where a GFCI is fed, where the MWBC continues on without GFCI protection so far and also a separate 2 conductor cable carries GFCI protection to additional outlet boxes.
__________________
Forget super sized fries. The Washington Redskins could promote healthy eating with First Lady Obama by choosing a (red skinned) turnip for a mascot.

Last edited by AllanJ; 11-13-2012 at 06:17 AM.
AllanJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2012, 06:51 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: WV
Posts: 2,943
Rewards Points: 2,066
Default

Confusing info from the county re GFCI


Quote:
Originally Posted by joed View Post
Every plug must be GFCI protected.
Is this some new code requirement? I know the small appliance circuits must be GFCI protected, but are you saying the receptacles for refrigerator, range hood, disposal, etc. must also be protected? Mine certainly aren't, but my house was wired to NEC 2005. I also (thankfully) did not have to have AFCIs except for the bedroom circuits.
md2lgyk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2012, 06:53 AM   #8
Licensed electrician
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,696
Rewards Points: 2,190
Default

Confusing info from the county re GFCI


Under the NEC only the receptacles that serve the countertop require the GFI protection.
__________________
Answers based on the National Electrical Code. Local amendments may apply. Check with your local building officials.
Jim Port is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Jim Port For This Useful Post:
brric (11-17-2012), jrclen (11-17-2012)
Old 11-13-2012, 07:30 AM   #9
Member
 
joed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Welland, Ontario
Posts: 7,855
Rewards Points: 2,504
Blog Entries: 4
Default

Confusing info from the county re GFCI


I thought we were talking about kitchen counter circuits when I stated every plug needs GFCI. I guess I should have been more specific.

Every kitchen counter receptacle needs to be GFCI protected.
__________________
Do not PM with questions that can be asked in a forum. I will not respond.
joed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2012, 01:53 AM   #10
Renovating My Land Yacht
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Gulf Coast MS
Posts: 536
Rewards Points: 538
Default

Confusing info from the county re GFCI


Thank you all, I did go back to the county and asked them to show me where it stated that they all had to be GFCI circuits and not just protected.

The guys said the other inspector was incorrect and we can just do the first one on the run. I'm happy I don't have to go out and spend $$ on plugs we didn't think we needed.

forcedreno2012 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
GFCI special application--on demand for brief period highdeserthome Electrical 33 01-20-2012 11:19 AM
Can you test a non GFCI plug with a GFCI tester? DIYguy2000 Electrical 3 01-16-2012 06:49 AM
GFCI Receptical Trip? Giles Electrical 9 06-04-2010 05:25 PM
Whirlpool GFCI circuit info conflict. 3detailer Electrical 29 05-17-2010 09:12 AM
GFCI Stumper ksqrdks Electrical 2 04-03-2010 06:24 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.