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Old 03-04-2011, 01:08 PM   #1
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Conduits stubbed too close together


The scenario: Several rigid conduits are stubbed out of an exterior wall at odd angles. Would it be NEC code compliant ( aside from 110-12, neat and workmanship manner) to cut one hole for all of the conduits and mount the 3R box over them? The back would be sealed with caulking and grounding bushings installed.

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Old 03-04-2011, 01:25 PM   #2
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Conduits stubbed too close together


as long as the ends of the pipes are addressed properly and the box is mounted securely and there are no openings remaining that would need to be sealed, ya, you're fine.

If you do it properly, you can even make it look nice and pretty and compliant with the workmanship requirements.

The caulking is the only thing in your description that I would have a problem with. While we all get away with a lot of things, depending on what you are actually sealing, it may or may not be a problem. Just not sure of your actual situation so I am not positive of how, exactly, you are using the caulk. If it is as a gasket between the wall and the box, you would be fine. If you are using it to replace parts of the box around the pipes where it isn't against a wall, it might be a problem.

got a picture?

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Old 03-04-2011, 02:45 PM   #3
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Conduits stubbed too close together


Thanks for the input Nap! I was leafing back and forth in the NEC trying to find something that would prevent me from doing it that way. Service equipment is mounted over conduit stubs so it seemed reasonable that it would be allowed. I thought maybe bastardizing the box might be an issue with the UL rating. I'll try and get a photo this weekend.
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Old 03-04-2011, 03:02 PM   #4
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Conduits stubbed too close together


You could use sealtite between the ends of the conduit and the box, to allow for adjustments in hole centers between the conduit ends and box.

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Old 03-04-2011, 07:15 PM   #5
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Conduits stubbed too close together


the pipes must be secured to the box with listed connectors - in short you can't cut a 6in hole in a box to connect 3 1in pipes.
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Old 03-04-2011, 08:29 PM   #6
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Conduits stubbed too close together


Quote:
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the pipes must be secured to the box with listed connectors - in short you can't cut a 6in hole in a box to connect 3 1in pipes.
I disagree. Can you cite code section that would require that?


What you just described happens all the time. I have never had an inspector shoot it down.
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Old 03-05-2011, 12:31 AM   #7
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Conduits stubbed too close together


Quote:
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I disagree. Can you cite code section that would require that?.
well no i can't find it in the code(didn't look) but what are EMT connectors for if not to make the juction between box and pipe?

now i'm aware that pipe can enter the bottom of a switchgear and not be physically connected in any way(usually pvc). but i'm not sure what the OP is talking about would fit

But I have to admit i'm not positive about this one and am willing to be shown.(can you find a code reference)
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Old 03-05-2011, 01:25 AM   #8
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Conduits stubbed too close together


what about 300.10?
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Old 03-05-2011, 07:53 AM   #9
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Conduits stubbed too close together


Thanks for finding that Cowboy! Ok, so mechanically secured.... I would think that the reason for this is to make sure the conduit is not flopping around.
The pipe is mechanically secured to the box by concrete and screws. The grounding conductor when attached to the box will make it metallically joined.
Wonder if an inspector would buy that one??
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Old 03-05-2011, 11:48 AM   #10
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Conduits stubbed too close together


Quote:
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what about 300.10?
that is for electrical continuity and Mobetta did say he was going to use bonding bushings. That would allow an electrical continuity.


Think about this: when installing a conduit in a concentric knockout where any size other than the largest pipe size is used(all knockout pieces removed), that is not considered to be an effective means of bonding and the conduit must be bonded by other means.

That leaves it to the mechanical construction and I see no problem with there being no physical connection as long as each part of the construction (pipes and box) are properly secured without considering the pipe to box connection as part of that securing.


Quote:
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Wonder if an inspector would buy that one??
I have done exactly what is sounds like you are doing and have never had an inspector question it let alone deny it. You do need to be concerned about box fill though if the pipes intrude into the box much at all. That would remove calculated area and as such, could cause an overfill condition if not considered.
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Old 03-05-2011, 12:47 PM   #11
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Conduits stubbed too close together


Even if the voltage was over 250V a grounding bushing is a "listed fitting" per
250.97. The real issue is the mechanical connection and I guess that is up to the AHJ in this case. I think I'll call and see what they have to say about it.
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Old 03-06-2011, 12:33 AM   #12
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Conduits stubbed too close together


please note it says mechanical connection. Yes it mentions electricaly conneected in the above sectence, but then it clearly say "it must be bolted"
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Old 03-06-2011, 11:28 AM   #13
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Conduits stubbed too close together


Yikes! I can't find "bolting" except maybe for landing the conductor in 250-8
where it gives you many options. Where do I look? Thanks sir!
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Old 03-06-2011, 12:03 PM   #14
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Conduits stubbed too close together


A bender and a short section of pipe is all you need to adjust these conduits to all fit into listed connectors. The trick here is to bend them sideways/forwards/backwards and then straight up without kinking them. Thats why one bender and a piece of scrap pipe is all you need.
This is a prime example of why we have electricians. We know how to do this simple stuff.
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Old 03-06-2011, 01:52 PM   #15
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Conduits stubbed too close together


JV, I could easily bend conduits to fit. I don't want to do it that way because
I would have stand the box off the wall and it would not look good.
I want a nice clean box mounted over the conduits and I'm trying to get
some opinions on whether or not it would be code compliant to do it that way. Got anything worthwhile to contribute?

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