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Old 06-06-2013, 02:36 AM   #1
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Commercial Electric Range


Hello all,

I'm considering a commercial electric range. I've found one with clearances that would make it feasible for my home without burning the place down.

It is rated at 70.8 amps for 240V single phase and the run would consist of less than 30 feet of wiring from the main panel.

1) Should I account for "continuous load" in a residential setting?

2) What wiring size and type should I consider when running this through an enclosed, dry basement?

3) I'm assuming that in the case of a commercial appliance like this, the cable will be hardwired directly to the terminal block, but I've not found that in the range literature. Would anyone happen to know?

Thank you,
Jim

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Old 06-06-2013, 05:20 AM   #2
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Commercial Electric Range


1) Ranges are not "continuous" loads. If they were, your food would burn to a crisp.

2) #4 type THHN copper conductors installed in conduit would be one appropriate wiring method.

3) Yes, most commercial ranges would require a hardwired connection. The last several feet can be installed in flex conduit from a wall mounted junction box to the appliance.

4) This is not a D-I-Y type of project, since you are dealing with a commercial appliance. Also be advised that some building codes may prohibit the installation of such a beastie in a residential area.

Best to call in a professional on this one.

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Old 06-06-2013, 10:26 AM   #3
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Commercial Electric Range


Why not gas?
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Old 06-06-2013, 11:17 AM   #4
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Commercial Electric Range


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Originally Posted by J. V. View Post
Why not gas?

I'm considering a commercial electric range. I've found one with clearances that would make it feasible for my home without burning the place down.
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Old 06-06-2013, 11:36 AM   #5
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Commercial Electric Range


Why not gas?

I'm considering a stove replacement because I need more burners capable of working with aluminium canners. If it weren't for the aluminum bit I could use induction. If it weren't for the canning bit, I wouldn't need more burners.

Gas would work, but I'm hoping to solve this issue without breaking the bank on a pro-style gas range rated for residential applications. Pro-style residential is much more expensive than commercial. Yet, in a commercial gas range, it's nearly hopeless to think of finding a range that would meet any sort of normal residential clearance.

The electric model has 0" clearance to combustible materials on the back and 2" on the sides, which means, the 36" 6 burner will fit in place of the current 40" stove with no problems with width. It'll still stick out further, but I can live with that.

I'm still leery of putting any commercial appliance in the house. There are codes and insurance regulations to consider.

Perhaps I'll just find a 240v portable electric coil or two to set up when needed.

Jim
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Old 06-06-2013, 12:26 PM   #6
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Commercial Electric Range


Can we assume you have checked your electric service to see if it can handle this much additional load? If you only have a 100 amp service you could have issues.
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Old 06-06-2013, 01:44 PM   #7
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I'm considering a commercial electric range. I've found one with clearances that would make it feasible for my home without burning the place down.
Quote:
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Can we assume you have checked your electric service to see if it can handle this much additional load? If you only have a 100 amp service you could have issues.
Capability is the only reason I mentioned gas.
70 amps is a bunch for one appliance and could tax your existing service.
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Old 06-06-2013, 02:51 PM   #8
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Commercial Electric Range


200 amp service

The existing stove is on a 50amp circuit. (40" made-by-Frigidaire, Kenmore double oven).

Induction cooktop (20 amps)
Dryer (30 amps)
Water heater (30 amps)
Central air (40 amps)
Dishwasher (12 amps)

Furnace is gas.

There's an electric kiln at 50amps.

If we assume a likely scenario:

stove, cooktop, water heater, air, an dishwasher all on at once, it would be theoretically possible to pull 152amps now, not including anything else that would be on in the house.

If the stove were to get replaced with the commercial range, it could be 172 amps.

Of course there is some leeway in that because those calculations include the ovens which are unlikely to be on while I'm bulk canning.

Would this be considered too much for the existing 200amp service?

Jim
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Old 06-06-2013, 06:48 PM   #9
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Commercial Electric Range


And new canners that would work with portable induction elements aren't less expensive than a commercial range?

Have you considered whether your AC is going to handle the added load of all that heat being pumped into the kitchen? That and the necessary make-up air to handle a vent hood for that much heat?

What about possibly setting up something outside? An outdoor kitchen might be another way to approach something like this.
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Old 06-06-2013, 07:02 PM   #10
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Commercial Electric Range


There are no canners that will work with induction. There is only one company that makes a stainless "canner" ... but it's not really a canner because you can't choose 3 different pressures ... and it is small to boot.

Outdoor kitchens have their own sets of problems. I have no desire to can outside either in the middle of the heat of summer nor the middle of the cold of winter.

And yes, ventilation and cooling are concerns, but not insurmountable. The AC for this house was oversized anyway.

Jim

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