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Old 09-04-2009, 09:12 AM   #1
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Code question


Does code allow for an outlet between a pantry door and garage door on a 1 1/2 to 2 foot section of wall?

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Old 09-04-2009, 09:19 AM   #2
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Does code allow for an outlet between a pantry door and garage door on a 1 1/2 to 2 foot section of wall?
Yes

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Old 09-04-2009, 09:24 AM   #3
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If the wall in question is part of the kitchen, it would have to be on one of the kitchen counter circuits, would it not?
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Old 09-04-2009, 09:44 AM   #4
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If the wall in question is part of the kitchen, it would have to be on one of the kitchen counter circuits, would it not?
The pantry is the end of the kitchen area, the garage door is in an alcove area, and that section of wall is in the transition between. It will be on the circuit that the fridge is on.
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Old 09-04-2009, 09:54 AM   #5
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Yes, you can definitely put an outlet there. There is nothing in the code that would prevent placing an outlet in what seems like and ordinary run of wall. (the width of the wall or the room that it is in doesn't come in to play in any unique way in your situation). The only thing I'm not sure about is putting that outlet on the fridge circuit. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't each stationary appliance need its own circuit? Practically speaking, a fridge doesn't use too much power, so you can most likely run that outlet off of it and never trip the circuit (depending on the amperage of the circuit, what else you might already have on there and what you plan on using on that outlet).
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Old 09-04-2009, 10:03 AM   #6
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Yes, you can definitely put an outlet there. There is nothing in the code that would prevent placing an outlet in what seems like and ordinary run of wall. (the width of the wall or the room that it is in doesn't come in to play in any unique way in your situation). The only thing I'm not sure about is putting that outlet on the fridge circuit. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't each stationary appliance need its own circuit? Practically speaking, a fridge doesn't use too much power, so you can most likely run that outlet off of it and never trip the circuit (depending on the amperage of the circuit, what else you might already have on there and what you plan on using on that outlet).
Probably a wall mount phone that will require a 110 outlet and maybe a small pantry light
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Old 09-04-2009, 10:14 AM   #7
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A fridge & stationary (not fixed in place-is that what you mean) appliances do not need dedicated circuits
There are exceptions such as some items fixed in place, & special rules for other items
Built in microwave
Built in fan/hood combo
Dishwasher
Garbage disposal

I prefer a fridge on a dedicated circuit
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Old 09-04-2009, 10:37 AM   #8
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Unless the instructions for the fridge called for a dedicated circuit it can share. Subzeros call for a dedicated circuit at least with some of their models.
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Old 09-04-2009, 11:24 AM   #9
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Unless the instructions for the fridge called for a dedicated circuit it can share. Subzeros call for a dedicated circuit at least with some of their models.
Thanks Gentlemen!
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Old 09-04-2009, 11:59 AM   #10
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FYI: I went over the top with adding circuits when I redid my kitchen two years ago. I didn't want to find out after the inspection that I needed to run more dedicated circuits, so I put every appliance on its own (except for doubling up on the garbage disposal and insta-hot tank under the sink) 9 circuits in total.

20A - countertop outlets (1)
20A - countertop outlets (2)
15A - refrigerator
15A - range hood/light
50A - oven
20A - built-in microwave
20A - garbage disposal & insta-hot water tank
15A - dishwasher
15A - ceiling and undercabinet lights

But anyway, if you are only going to put a phone and a light on the circuit with the fridge, I don't see that being a problem or an inspector not allowing it.
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Old 09-04-2009, 12:51 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by adpanko View Post
20A - countertop outlets (1)
20A - countertop outlets (2)
15A - refrigerator
15A - range hood/light
50A - oven
20A - built-in microwave
20A - garbage disposal & insta-hot water tank
15A - dishwasher
15A - ceiling and undercabinet lights
Refrigerator on 15 amp ? I would have put on 20 amp breaker with 12-2,But thats just my opinion.
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Old 09-04-2009, 12:54 PM   #12
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I ran 12-2 for my refridge & had a 15a so installed that breaker
I'll have 4 kitchen counter circuits when I'm finished, plus a 5th in the adjoining sunroom
I've learned you can never have too many circuits for the kitchen
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Old 09-04-2009, 01:57 PM   #13
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Refrigerator on 15 amp ? I would have put on 20 amp breaker with 12-2,But thats just my opinion.
I don't recall the exact wattage, but when I checked the the spec sticker, it was far below the 1,650 total available wattage of a 15A circuit, so I went with 15. It is not one of those monster 48" wide Sub Zeros or anything, just a basic looking 21 cu ft GE Profile. I assume larger units may need 20A.
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Old 09-04-2009, 02:45 PM   #14
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Mine's a 26 cu ft & still specified a 15 a circuit (1800 watts available)
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Old 09-04-2009, 02:58 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by 300zx View Post
Refrigerator on 15 amp ? I would have put on 20 amp breaker with 12-2,But thats just my opinion.
Section 210.52(B)(1) Exception No. 2: The receptacle outlet for refrigeration equipment shall be permitted to be supplied from an individual branch circuit rated 15 amperes or greater.

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