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Old 12-26-2010, 08:37 AM   #1
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Circuit breakers


What is a Single Pole Two Switch Breaker?

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Old 12-26-2010, 09:09 AM   #2
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Circuit breakers


No idea...what are you trying to do?

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Old 12-26-2010, 09:44 AM   #3
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Circuit breakers


sounds like you want a tandem.two breakers in one.by the way these are not 220.
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Old 12-26-2010, 09:45 AM   #4
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Circuit breakers


There is a single pole breaker that has 2 "switches" - breakers
It pulls power from the same hot feed to power both circuits
So it can only be used for 120v
And some breaker panels will not accept them


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Old 12-26-2010, 09:46 AM   #5
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Circuit breakers


Duh, didn't even think of a tandem breaker.
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Old 12-26-2010, 09:53 AM   #6
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Circuit breakers


Scuba Dave had what I was looking for. Thanks to everyone for all the quick help!
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Old 12-26-2010, 09:53 AM   #7
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Circuit breakers


Yup, I think Oleman and Scuba have it.

handy woman, why do you ask?
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Old 12-26-2010, 09:58 AM   #8
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I am working on an old house with some renovations. Moving some light switches and outlets, but electrical work is not my specialty. I was advised to use this type of breaker (by a neighbor - not sure how careful they are with work) but was unsure what it meant. I will investigate the "tandem breaker" a little more before I do the job. Just trying to be sure what I am using before I get in the middle of a project I can't finish correctly. Thanks for your help.
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Old 12-26-2010, 10:31 AM   #9
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Circuit breakers


If you do use tandem breakers, make certain that your service panel will accept. Many panels will not accept tandems at all, or will only accept tandems in select slots.
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Old 12-26-2010, 12:11 PM   #10
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Circuit breakers


It is also important when using tandem breakers that both wires attached are on the same phase! If you mix phases (attach 2 wires from opposite phases that share a neutral) you can overload the neutral!

Also, new code changes, which may be applicable to the new work you are doing, do not allow for 2 circuits sharing a neutral to be supplied via single pole breakers. You must now use a 2-pole breaker to feed 2-circuits sharing a neutral or run separate neutrals for each circuit. In addition to that for new work you must also use a AFCI circuit breaker for all household circuits unless they are supplying power to an appliance. This does not necessarily apply to existing work, but it definitely applies to new work!

If the work you are doing is permitted you may want to ask your local electrical inspector or AHJ prior to completing this work!

Good luck!
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Last edited by sparks1up; 12-26-2010 at 12:14 PM.
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Old 12-26-2010, 12:36 PM   #11
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Circuit breakers


Quote:
Originally Posted by sparks1up View Post
It is also important when using tandem breakers that both wires attached are on the same phase! If you mix phases (attach 2 wires from opposite phases that share a neutral) you can overload the neutral!

Also, new code changes, which may be applicable to the new work you are doing, do not allow for 2 circuits sharing a neutral to be supplied via single pole breakers. You must now use a 2-pole breaker to feed 2-circuits sharing a neutral or run separate neutrals for each circuit. In addition to that for new work you must also use a AFCI circuit breaker for all household circuits unless they are supplying power to an appliance. This does not necessarily apply to existing work, but it definitely applies to new work!

If the work you are doing is permitted you may want to ask your local electrical inspector or AHJ prior to completing this work!

Good luck!
You can share a single neutral between two opposite hot legs from a double-breaker. Four-wire appliance circuits (dryers and electric ranges) use this approach to power the 120V components of those appliances.

You cannot share a neutral between two circuits connected to a tandem breaker. Each circuit must be individually bonded to the neutral bus (as well as grounded individually to the grounding bus). A tandem breaker by design can only draw from a single hot leg in a service panel.

Not to confuse the OP here, but if you want to share a single neutral between two circuits in a multi-wire branch circuit (MWBC), you must use a double-pole breaker with tie-bar. This will draw from opposite hot legs in the service panel, which prevents the possibility of overload on the shared neutral and also ensures that if one side of the MWBC trips, both sides will be cut off simultaneously.

Depending on what the OP is trying to do, a tandem breaker may be the correct approach, or maybe she needs an MWBC. If she needs an MWBC, then a tandem breaker will not be appropriate and there are some special considerations concerning the neutral connection which must be taken.
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Old 12-26-2010, 12:41 PM   #12
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Circuit breakers


MWBC's may be supplied by either a double pole circuit breaker or by adjacent single pole circuit breakers with a handle tie.
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Old 12-26-2010, 12:47 PM   #13
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MWBC's may be supplied by either a double pole circuit breaker or by adjacent single pole circuit breakers with a handle tie.
Agreed that a handle-tie across two single-pole breakers will work for an MWBC, although my local code requires a double-pole breaker. Either solution requires two slots in a service panel, though.

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