DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Electrical (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/)
-   -   Changing a nema 5-15r into a nema 6-20r (http://www.diychatroom.com/f18/changing-nema-5-15r-into-nema-6-20r-151153/)

Sesom 07-22-2012 02:00 PM

Changing a nema 5-15r into a nema 6-20r
 
Hello,I don't know a whole lot on this subject at this time. But I would like to install a nema 6-20 receptical in my place. Let me know if I am off track here. Here is what I know right now.


Looking at the breakers I see that they all have a 20 on the switches. This leads me to believe they are all 20 amp breakers with the exception of four of them that say 40 on them. I believe that wiring should also be 12 gauge for 20 amps.

Now, if I confirm that I have 12 gauge wire connected to the 5-15r that is run to a 20 amp breaker would I be able to simply wire a 6-20r in it's place? Is this more or less how this works or is there a lot more to that process?Thank you.

LooseSCruz 07-22-2012 02:14 PM

That is, unfortunately, not exactly how it works with what you want to do. What you have currently, NEMA 5-15, is a 120V receptacle. What you want, NEMA 6-20, is a 240V receptacle. Is the current 5-15 receptacle the ONLY thing on this circuit?

Sesom 07-22-2012 02:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LooseSCruz (Post 971717)
Is the current 5-15 receptacle the ONLY thing on this circuit?

There are two outlets on this receptacle I believe. I was considering it in a couple different places. Would this need to be the only thing on the receptacle? Or the only thing on use on a receptacle?

LooseSCruz 07-22-2012 02:29 PM

To put it simply, you can't just put a 240V receptacle in place of a 120V one because the circuit currently supplying that receptacle is only delivering 120V (i.e. it won't power the 6-20 receptacle). To do what you want, you'll have to verify that the 5-15 is the only device on the circuit that controls it, and change the circuit to supply 240V instead of the current 120V.

Sesom 07-22-2012 02:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LooseSCruz (Post 971729)
you can't just put a 240V receptacle in place of a 120V one because the circuit currently supplying that receptacle is only delivering 120V (i.e. it won't power the 6-20 receptacle). To do what you want, you'll have to verify that the 5-15 is the only device on the circuit that controls it, and change the circuit to supply 240V instead of the current 120V.

Okay, this is good to know. So if the breaker switch is 20 amp, it doesn't mean 240v can be delivered from just an outlet swap, correct?

LooseSCruz 07-22-2012 02:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sesom (Post 971738)
Okay, this is good to know. So if the breaker switch is 20 amp, it doesn't mean 240v can be delivered from just an outlet swap, correct?

Correct. Currently, you have a single pole breaker. For 240V, you would need to change the breaker out for a two pole and change the wiring a bit.

LooseSCruz 07-22-2012 02:51 PM

Not to mention, as I said, you'd have to verify that there were no other devices on the current 120V circuit if you were to change it over to a 240V line.

Sesom 07-22-2012 03:04 PM

Are 5-15 or 5-20 ever installed via 2 pole?

Sesom 07-22-2012 03:27 PM

Also, in my case. Would I be able to swap a 5-15r for a 5-20r?

LooseSCruz 07-22-2012 03:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sesom (Post 971758)
Are 5-15 or 5-20 ever installed via 2 pole?

The only situation I can think of when a 5-15 or 5-20 would be on a circuit controlled by a two pole breaker would be if they were part of what's called a Multi-Wire Branch Circuit. But in that case, they're still supplied with 120V, they just have a two pole breaker because the two circuits share a common neutral and thus you want both to trip if one does. If I'm incorrect, I'm sure I'll be quickly corrected by one of the pros here.

Just to make it clear, though: In no case that I can think of would a 5-15 or 5-20, even if the circuit is on a two pole breaker, be supplied with 240V. These are 120V only devices and should only be supplied with 120V.

LooseSCruz 07-22-2012 03:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sesom (Post 971763)
Also, in my case. Would I be able to swap a 5-15r for a 5-20r?

Yes, assuming the the breaker is a 20A and the wiring is all 12 gauge, there shouldn't be a problem swapping a 20A duplex for the 15A.

Sesom 07-22-2012 06:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LooseSCruz (Post 971768)
Yes, assuming the the breaker is a 20A and the wiring is all 12 gauge, there shouldn't be a problem swapping a 20A duplex for the 15A.

A 5-15 and a 5-20 can be on the same circuit as well, correct?

frenchelectrican 07-22-2012 06:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sesom (Post 971891)
A 5-15 and a 5-20 can be on the same circuit as well, correct?

Oui it is and with 15 amp duplex they are approved to run on 20 amp 120 volt circuit but if you have singleplex then you have to use 20 amp verison and you will have to verify the conductor size at the receptale to make sure you are using #12 awg if not #12 then you can not use them and have to stay on 15 amp breaker.

Note: there are some case you may run into larger conductors than you will expected to see like #10 awg which it is common to use on long runs to comperised the voltage drop ( useally more than 80-125 feet long or more )

Merci,
Marc


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:33 PM.